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Thread: Wax paper for quilt templates/stencils??

  1. #1
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    Wax paper for quilt templates/stencils??

    I have been searching through different articles and videos on marking stencils for my final quilting. I ran across a video that showed using wax paper as you can iron it directly on to the quilt, stitch and then tear away. My question is if I have a design and I need to repeat it several times can I cut the wax paper to 8-1/2 x 11 then run it through my inkjet printer? Other than tracing several times over is there an easier way to do this to get multiple copies produced.

    Thanks!!

    Mindy

  2. #2
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    my thought is that the wax in the paper might effect the printer. I know of using freezer paper which is heavier. I would not trust it not to get wax into the printer. However, it might work. However ink jet would not heat the paper. weight of the paper might also be an issue.

  3. #3
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    I don't think ironing wax paper to your quilt would be a good idea. Wouldn't it leave a residue on the fabric? I have ironed freezer paper to fabric and it doesn't leave a residue. You might want to use several sheets of tissue paper or newsprint paper and mark the quilting pattern on the first sheet. Stack up several sheets and staple the corners together. Set your stitch length on your machine to a big stitch, remove the thread from the needle and stitch the quilting outline through all the sheets. Remove the staples from the corner and you have several copies of the quilting design. Pin the paper to the blocks and follow the perforated holes and carefully tear away the paper when finished.

  4. #4
    Super Member Pollytink's Avatar
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    I got a tablet of tracing paper, tore the sheets out and trimmed them to 8.5 size (length doesn't matter, just width to fit in the feeder tray), made a copy of the pattern I wanted and printed it onto the tracing paper. Trimmed the design to fit, pinned it to the quilt and quilted over it, then tore off paper. Worked pretty well!

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    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by murphzmom View Post
    I have been searching through different articles and videos on marking stencils for my final quilting. I ran across a video that showed using wax paper as you can iron it directly on to the quilt, stitch and then tear away. My question is if I have a design and I need to repeat it several times can I cut the wax paper to 8-1/2 x 11 then run it through my inkjet printer? Other than tracing several times over is there an easier way to do this to get multiple copies produced.

    Thanks!!

    Mindy
    Wax paper and freezer paper are two different things and are not interchangeable.

  6. #6
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    there is a HUGE difference between Wax paper & FREEZER PAPER....freezer paper has a plastic coating on one side- is white paper on the other side- you can see through it is easy to trace patterns onto the paper side- then you press the plastic side to your fabric--it does not leave a sticky residue- holds well- is reusable multiple times when used for applique patterns- or templates you are cutting around- runs through your printer nicely.
    WAX paper is the stuff we used to press leaves between sheets of when we were kids in grade school- it is WAXY---will leave a wax coating on fabric (and possibly stain it- it is not what you want to use ...Freezer paper comes in a large blue box in the grocery paper/plastic isle....near the wax paper- but they are two totally different products that you don't want to mix up.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

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    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Are you sure it was waxed paper, not freezer paper? I cannot believe someone would suggest ironing waxed paper on to a quilt. You can put freezer paper thru an inkjet, but not a laser printer as the heat from the laser will melt the freezer paper on to the drum.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

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    Thanks for all the responses. I did mean freezer paper and not wax paper. I was thinking one thing but actually typed out the other. So, in regards to freezer paper, do you think that could be cut down to go through my printer as long as the design would print out on the white paper side.

  9. #9
    Senior Member omaluvs2quilt's Avatar
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    I got tired of picking out paper, so I'm on to the iron off pounce...like it much better! I've used the freezer paper also, but the golden threads paper or tracing paper tear off much better in my opinion.

  10. #10
    Senior Member kat13's Avatar
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    They sell freezer paper sheets that are for use with a printer too. I first use plexi glass, large sheet of it and put it on my quilt and use a dry marker to get ideas on what I want to do. Then I use regular tracing paper, if your stitches are small it pulls off very good and any tiny pieces that are left come out in the wash.

  11. #11
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    Can any one tell me what you pay for a roll of freezer paper in the States?

  12. #12
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    I DO use waxed paper to audition designs. I don't iron them, but I can fold them up and save them. Since deciding WHAT to quilt is the hardest part of the process for me, I like to keep the good ones!

  13. #13
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    The only thing I've used waxed paper for in relation to quilting is ironing over it to set crayon coloring on blocks. Works great!

    The crayon colored blocks lasted for years until the background muslin gave up of old age and hard usage. Some of it had been done by my mother and her sister before my mom got married in the 30s and I finished it as a home ec project in the 60s. Retired to display only in the 90s and destroyed by fire when our house burned in 2000. Colors were still pretty even after 30 years of washing.

  14. #14
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    Yes it can be cut down. In fact there is a company that sells it in letter size. If you do cut down I would suggest using a rotary cutter to assure straight edges and lay them all flat with heavy books on top to flatten them out before putting thru copier.

  15. #15
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    I've used tissue paper and wax paper, but I did not iron the wax paper to the quilt - just an occasional pin. They both tear away so much easier than freezer paper.

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    I like the tissue paper, or exam table paper rolls for quilt stencils to FMQ on.

  17. #17
    Super Member MaryKatherine's Avatar
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    I use was paper ALL the time for repeats.
    Take one copy of you pattern and put it on top of a nest of paper piece. Then run it through your sewing machine with no thread.
    I pin my paper pieces in place on the quilt and then tear the paper away.

    MaryKatherine
    marykayhopkins123.blogspot.com

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pollytink View Post
    I got a tablet of tracing paper, tore the sheets out and trimmed them to 8.5 size (length doesn't matter, just width to fit in the feeder tray), made a copy of the pattern I wanted and printed it onto the tracing paper. Trimmed the design to fit, pinned it to the quilt and quilted over it, then tore off paper. Worked pretty well!
    Using tracing paper is a good thing, since I found some in my cleaning. It feels like it would tear away ok.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom-6 View Post
    The only thing I've used waxed paper for in relation to quilting is ironing over it to set crayon coloring on blocks. Works great!

    The crayon colored blocks lasted for years until the background muslin gave up of old age and hard usage. Some of it had been done by my mother and her sister before my mom got married in the 30s and I finished it as a home ec project in the 60s. Retired to display only in the 90s and destroyed by fire when our house burned in 2000. Colors were still pretty even after 30 years of washing.
    Now that is a good thing to do, the wax paper sets the coloring better? Hey I am going to try that one, never really washed any of the coloring on doll quilts to see if it will stay there.

  20. #20
    Super Member Yooper32's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryKatherine View Post
    I use was paper ALL the time for repeats.
    Take one copy of you pattern and put it on top of a nest of paper piece. Then run it through your sewing machine with no thread.
    I pin my paper pieces in place on the quilt and then tear the paper away.

    MaryKatherine
    I have used this method many times and mostly I do it with tissue paper, just make a pile of sheets and sew away after making your tracing of the pattern choice. The tissue tears away easily.
    Yooper32 aka: Donna B

  21. #21
    Super Member copycat's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=mom-6;5923216]The only thing I've used waxed paper for in relation to quilting is ironing over it to set crayon coloring on blocks. Works great!

    The crayon colored blocks lasted for years until the background muslin gave up of old age and hard usage. Some of it had been done by my mother and her sister before my mom got married in the 30s and I finished it as a home ec project in the 60s. Retired to display only in the 90s and destroyed by fire when our house burned in 2000
    I am sorry for your loss due to the house fire. Hopefully someone may have taken a photo of your mom's crayon colored block quilt. It could be a fun project to recreate it.
    I began quilting 3 yrs. ago and have not heard about coloring blocks with crayons and setting the colors using wax paper.
    Are the crayons a special fabric friendly type or a specific brand? I would love to try this. Thanks you!

  22. #22
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    Freezer paper would work better than wax paprer. Freezer paper can be ironed on and reused many times.
    Not sure about ironing wax paper on a quilt. Will the wax transfer to the fabric?

  23. #23
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    do you have a glass company in your town? sometimes they will cut what you want for little or no cost. A sheetmetal shop can cut templates. I am lucky my brother owns a glass co and I work for a company that has a sheetmetal shop right thur the door of my office. I have tons and tons of templates, all I have to do is feed the sheetmetal man and he'll cut what I want

  24. #24
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    there is a HUGE difference between Wax paper & FREEZER PAPER....freezer paper has a plastic coating on one side- is white paper on the other side- you can see through it is easy to trace patterns onto the paper side- then you press the plastic side to your fabric--it does not leave a sticky residue- holds well- is reusable multiple times when used for applique patterns- or templates you are cutting around- runs through your printer nicely.
    WAX paper is the stuff we used to press leaves between sheets of when we were kids in grade school- it is WAXY---will leave a wax coating on fabric (and possibly stain it- it is not what you want to use ...Freezer paper comes in a large blue box in the grocery paper/plastic isle....near the wax paper- but they are two totally different products that you don't want to mix up.
    I saw a demo somewhere where the quilter "stitched" the quilting pattern onto several sheets of wax paper at a time using her sewing machine but with no thread in the needle, then using that pattern to pounce her pattern on her blocks. I've never seen anyone iron wax paper to a quilt. I'd be very afraid of residue.

  25. #25
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    I use Glad Press and Seal. It sticks to the quilt, and isn't too much trouble to peel off
    after the design is sewn.

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