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Thread: What am I doing wrong?

  1. #1
    Senior Member luana's Avatar
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    What am I doing wrong?

    I am doing some quilting on my domestic machine. I want to bury the ends of my threads. I bought a pack of those easy thread needles, the ones where you pull the thread through the end. Every time I try to pull the thread through, the thread breaks. I have watched Leah Day videos, and she doesn't have any problems. I've done several searches on this board.What am I doing wrong. I am open to any suggestions, including tips for burying threads.

  2. #2
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    will watch thread. trying to learn how to do this.
    when life gets you down go and talk with a little kid. They will help you work out even the worst problems with their simple logic.

  3. #3
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Is it possible the needle has a burr in the eye? Did you try with a different needle in the pack?

    I don't bury threads unless it is for a juryed show quilt or I am hand quilting. I take several teeny tiny stitches and snip my thread at the surface of the quilt. Those teeny tiny ones don't come out.

  4. #4
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    There are several different types of these needles. there's the one's with a "V" in the top, ones with a slit in the side and the ones that have a spiral. I have never been successful with the ones with the "V" cotton thread always seems to break. I got the ones from JoAnn's, with the slit in the side of the eye. I think they were $10 for 8 or 10 needles. They work OK, but do make a large hole which goes away if you rub it, or launder it. The spiral ones are supposed to be wonderful, but should be for the price:
    http://www.spiraleyeneedles.com/Needles.html
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  5. #5
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    Are you talking about the spiral eye needles? If so, Pam Turner's website has a video on how to use the needle. Left hand side of the page, half way down.
    http://www.spiraleyeneedles.com/

    When I bury threads, I use a larger eyed needle as I can't see the hole for nothin'. The needle is real thin and 1 7/8" long. Don't know the brand, and is not a hand-stitching needle.

    On my last stitch, I do back stitch. I cut the threads leaving about 8" strands from top and bobbin threads. I just keep sewing and bury the threads when I have enough room to maneuver the quilt for burying the threads. I take the top thread and pull up slightly to bring the bottom thread through the quilt. With needle eye end, I pull the bottom thread to the top, then make a quilters knot close to the quilt. Pull up the threads together and snip the ends so they are even. Thread both threads. Next I put the needle through the hole made by both threads and make one stitch along the seam line. Guide the needle along the seam in the batting layer, bringing up the needle and thread along the seam line. Back stitch one and guide the needle through to the batting to the side of the seam line and go as far as the needle will go. The needle of course needs to come back up through the front of the quilt. Pull the threads a little taut and snip. But not too close to the fabric to prevent cutting into the fabric.

    There are many tutorials online for burying threads in different ways. This is how I learned and it works for me.

  6. #6
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    I highly recommend the officialy Spiral Eye needle. There is a knock off made in China that am told is not as good as the original. Am told you can get 4-5 or so at the box stores for about $10. but they are not finished like the official (if you can call it that) Spiral Eye. So for me the additional cost of the official is worth it. I use the #8. The time saved in threading is worth the extra $$ to me. Thread doesn't break - at least I havn't found it so and the needle doesn't come unthreaded like the "v" type does.

  7. #7
    Senior Member kaelynangelfoot's Avatar
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    I never use easy thread needles anymore because 1) the thread broke constantly and 2) the needle broke constantly. I think the slit they make weakens the needle significantly. I always felt like I should be wearing safety glasses when using those!

  8. #8
    Senior Member luana's Avatar
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    Thanks for the help. I've watched several tutorial, but there's nothing better than advice from those who have "been there and done that". Thanks

  9. #9
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    I got this thing that looks like a tiny crochet hook that is made especially for burying threads. I have only used it once but it was easier than the needles which I used in the past. It is called a soft touch thread pic.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    I guess I'll be the dissenting voice here. I use Fons and Porter's self-threading needles. The ones with a 'V'. I also frequently use Aurifil 50wt thread, which is a thin 2ply thread, for quilting and I have not had any problems with the thread or needles breaking. Here is what I have learned: You must have a fairly decent size thread tail so that you are not pulling down hard on the thread. With a longer piece of thread it is easier to slide the needle onto the thread. Also, I always use the largest size in the pack that helps minimize breakage as well.

    I also have a Soft Touch thread pick but I haven't tried it yet. I'm looking forward to trying it out.

  11. #11
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    I use the V ones from Walmart. The only time I have trouble is with rayon embroidery thread. I do pull both thread ends down together into the V not one at a time.

  12. #12
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    Same here, teeny tiny at the start and the end

  13. #13
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    I had the same problem with a pack I bought. I tried all of them and the thread just broke. So I sent a nice email to the company that made them asking if I could be doing something wrong when threading them. They sent me another pack of needles and I had no more trouble - maybe sometimes there's a glitch in the manufacture.

  14. #14
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    I bought the ones with the v and the thread broke every time. Took the back to the store and they worked perfectly for the lady who waited on me. Continued to break for me. I bought some cheap needle threaders and they worked fine. Buried all the threads (and there were a lot) in a very short time. Worked great for me and only cost a couple of dollars.
    Sue

  15. #15
    Senior Member luana's Avatar
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    I'm happy to hear that it's not just ME. Think I will try a different needle.

  16. #16
    Junior Member Pattycakes's Avatar
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    Burying your threads in the quilt

    I went on you tube and typed in what I was looking for and got this.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmZAzW_175s

    Try this method it seems to work better. Good luck!
    Quilting Mad in Mansfield, Ohio
    Patty

  17. #17
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    I don't use anything extra. I make a quilter's knot a few stitches from where I want the thread to enter the fabric. Then, I slide the needle between the batting and backing and pop it inside; move it an inch or two inside the quilt. I exit the quilt, snip the thread and the long tail slips inside the quilt. I have never had a problem with tails coming undone.

  18. #18
    Senior Member mustangquilts's Avatar
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    I use those needles most of the time. Just gently pull the thread threw. When my thread is very fine, I use a regular needle and threader to thread them with. Never have a problem.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by NanaCsews2 View Post
    Are you talking about the spiral eye needles? If so, Pam Turner's website has a video on how to use the needle. Left hand side of the page, half way down.
    http://www.spiraleyeneedles.com/

    When I bury threads, I use a larger eyed needle as I can't see the hole for nothin'. The needle is real thin and 1 7/8" long. Don't know the brand, and is not a hand-stitching needle.

    On my last stitch, I do back stitch. I cut the threads leaving about 8" strands from top and bobbin threads. I just keep sewing and bury the threads when I have enough room to maneuver the quilt for burying the threads. I take the top thread and pull up slightly to bring the bottom thread through the quilt. With needle eye end, I pull the bottom thread to the top, then make a quilters knot close to the quilt. Pull up the threads together and snip the ends so they are even. Thread both threads. Next I put the needle through the hole made by both threads and make one stitch along the seam line. Guide the needle along the seam in the batting layer, bringing up the needle and thread along the seam line. Back stitch one and guide the needle through to the batting to the side of the seam line and go as far as the needle will go. The needle of course needs to come back up through the front of the quilt. Pull the threads a little taut and snip. But not too close to the fabric to prevent cutting into the fabric.

    There are many tutorials online for burying threads in different ways. This is how I learned and it works for me.
    What is a quilter's knot?
    Happy quilting Grandma

  20. #20
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
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    I have not had any trouble with these needles, however, I have had trouble with some threads. Did you try using a different spool of thread. I, myself, would rather use a needle threader if you are having trouble with breaking.

  21. #21
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    This is the neatest way to bury those threads from longarm quilting I have seen. Have a quilt about read to come off of a frame and will need to bury some threads and will definitely try this. Was not looking forward to trying to thread that needle on each one of them, but this will solve the problem. When hand quilting I take a tiny stitch at the end of my quilting and then bury the end of the thread in the quilt and have never had any trouble. Have had some tell me they don't take the tiny stitch, but just bury the tread some length of away from the last stitch.
    Thanks for the link and Happy Quilting to every one.

    themachinelady

  22. #22
    Junior Member Freddie's Avatar
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    I love this method of hers. Had never seen it before in my 60 some years. That proofs, that you can learn something new every day!


    Quote Originally Posted by Pattycakes View Post
    I went on you tube and typed in what I was looking for and got this.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmZAzW_175s

    Try this method it seems to work better. Good luck!

  23. #23
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pattycakes View Post
    I went on you tube and typed in what I was looking for and got this.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmZAzW_175s

    Try this method it seems to work better. Good luck!
    Wow, I am for sure using this method the next time!!

  24. #24
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    I had this happen, too, solved it.

    Quote Originally Posted by luana View Post
    I am doing some quilting on my domestic machine. I want to bury the ends of my threads. I bought a pack of those easy thread needles, the ones where you pull the thread through the end. Every time I try to pull the thread through, the thread breaks. I have watched Leah Day videos, and she doesn't have any problems. I've done several searches on this board.What am I doing wrong. I am open to any suggestions, including tips for burying threads.
    I got the next larger needle, and it worked great. I kept dropping the needle, though, and had a hard time finding a needle with no thread on it.

  25. #25
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    Pattycakes, I love this technique and I am a hand quilter...I do not tie a knot at beginning but leave a dangle and then go back and quilt from there, or bury thread. Your method has wonderful value in that one doesn't have to thread needles constantly. Wow, you may be sure I will use this in the future

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