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Thread: What to do with a warped top?

  1. #26
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    Good luck...:)

  2. #27
    rb.
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    If it's a OBW, you have several seams you could easily adjust by just sewing them a bit wider, without removing anything. Kinda' like making a dart in sewing. If the steam/press method doesn't work.

  3. #28
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    I agree that you need to block the top. Pin to the carpet with T pins, making sure that it is square by using a carpenter's square, and then spray it until lightly damp all over. Let dry naturally and you should not have to press it. That should do it. If not, try to quilt it out.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elisabrat
    Ok, um, this is not for me *uh huh*.. I have this OBW quilt top. Finished ready to quilt. Question is it does NOT lay flat. There are a couple spots its warped? not sure if this is the correct wording.. but I am about as done with it as I am going to be and want to quilt it and never do one again. Ok.. at least I don't want to toss it in the fire to start the kindling which of course I have never thought of before now.. I just think it wont take to regular quilting as it might buckle or whatever the correct term is on top. So how do I finish it besides in the fire? I just would love so much to get a couple words of advice here. I am lost :(

    Thanks for listening to my P* and moaning. I promise to post if it finishes out with only having to hang my chin to my chest and not my toes.
    Is it really wonky? Are you sure it won't quilt out? to be flat? It can't fix a wrong dimension...you have to trim slivers (or more) off to do that.
    Are you going to send it off to be machine quilted? THAT will fix minor faults.

    It needs to be at least heavily basted to do this. Sometimes this is done to finished quilts to straighten them.

    Have you got a big enough flat place you can get wet?
    You might have to go outdoors to fix a large quilt.

    Have you tried wet blocking the quilt?
    Have you heard of this?

    Lay the quilt top on something that will hold water, like a big piece of plastic or a shower curtain with the edges turned up a little, about an inch.

    Carefully begin to wet the quilt soaking it, but no more water than that. Using a long straight edge, like a long ruler, lay it along the edge, pushing a bit toward the center until the edge is straight. Press it down with your fingers to sort of "squish" the threads in the fabric down flat. Wiggle them just a little bit to move the fibers!
    If you have a hump work it flat.

    Take a towel and lay it over the quilt soaking up as much of the water as you can, without disturbing the "flattened" parts. Take off the wet towel. Repeat with a dry towel as many times as you want. Not too dry, though Wet, not drippy is what you want.
    Leave it to dry undisturbed. Do not touch it until it is completely dry..It will dry faster outdoors, Cover it with a sheet to keep debris off. It will dry OK with the sheet on.
    You can use a fan indoors, moving it occasionally.
    It will dry flat and square.
    It will stay that way!
    Just carefully don't stretch it again.
    Jeannie

  5. #30
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    I can't believe this topic has been discussed all day and no one has posted the link to this hilarious video!!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzoL7ddTEnA

    You've even been using the term "you can quilt it out"...

    Haaaaaaaaaa! Watch this cute video and you'll realize you are not alone, and you'll feel better!

  6. #31
    Super Member grammysharon's Avatar
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    I think most quilters have experienced this problem. I agree, try and steam it into submission and then quilt heavily in that area :lol:

  7. #32
    Senior Member Janquiltz's Avatar
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    Sewbizgirl - thanks for sharing - that song and the video was a riot!

  8. #33
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    It's hard to tell without seeing it, but, it sounds like something that can be worked out on a longarm machine. I have had quilts brought to me in much worse shape and they lay flat after being quilted. You might want to consider an overall pattern that is done from the front of the machine so particular attention can be paid to the troubled spots. Good luck.

  9. #34
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    Hi
    I would really like to know what little creature you are holding in your Avatar, it looks tiny and at peace !!

    Nosy Mad Gertie from Kent, England

  10. #35
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    Hi
    I would really like to know what little creature you are holding in your Avatar, it looks tiny and at peace !!

    Nosy Mad Gertie from Kent, England

  11. #36
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Gertie
    Hi
    I would really like to know what little creature you are holding in your Avatar, it looks tiny and at peace !!

    Nosy Mad Gertie from Kent, England
    She hasn't said, but my guess is that it's a baby red squirell.

  12. #37
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    watch the Utube mosic video-"YOU CAN QUILT THAT OUT", then send it to LAQ'r! not ever helpful, but the video is funny! They wouldn't have made a song & video if it didn't happen regularly! LOL!! GOOD LUCK, it will turn out fine.

  13. #38
    Senior Member pawebdoctor's Avatar
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    Give it to a warped friend... we all have at least one!
    Seriously... we are our worst critics. Try steaming and pressing... and if you have to take in a seam or two... that's ok too. But don't give up!

  14. #39

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    Sometimes if the borders are put on unevenly it will cause the ripples. I always measure each side and then the middle, add all three together then divide by 3. This will be your average. Now cut both sides the same side and use the measurment that you got when divided by 3.

  15. #40
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    OMG this made me giggle till I almost wet myself. Yes we have all been there at one point or another. You worded it just perfectly. Will pass this along to all my quilting friends. It makes me think of a fellow quilter who was quilting her queen size quilt, she said every once in a while, her machine would slow down and just chug chug chug for about 5 or 6 stitches. Then it would resume regular stitching for a few more minutes, and then again with the chug chug chug, and just drag for about 5 or 6 stitches. She got up from 2 go hours of solid quilting, held up her quilt and thought, what a great job she had done. Then she looked at the back of her quilt !!!!!!!!!!! And there, ever so neatly, she had quilted her soft vinyl tape measure into the back of her quilt. Quilting 101 , moral of the story, clean your work space before you start quilting !!!!!!!!!!! Greetings from Auntie B, Saskatchewan Canada.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Auntie B
    OMG this made me giggle till I almost wet myself. Yes we have all been there at one point or another. You worded it just perfectly. Will pass this along to all my quilting friends. It makes me think of a fellow quilter who was quilting her queen size quilt, she said every once in a while, her machine would slow down and just chug chug chug for about 5 or 6 stitches. Then it would resume regular stitching for a few more minutes, and then again with the chug chug chug, and just drag for about 5 or 6 stitches. She got up from 2 go hours of solid quilting, held up her quilt and thought, what a great job she had done. Then she looked at the back of her quilt !!!!!!!!!!! And there, ever so neatly, she had quilted her soft vinyl tape measure into the back of her quilt. Quilting 101 , moral of the story, clean your work space before you start quilting !!!!!!!!!!! Greetings from Auntie B, Saskatchewan Canada.
    TOO FUNNY, CAN'T QUIT LAUGHING!!!

  17. #42
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    I had a quilt that started about twin size and ended about lap quilt size by trying to beat it into submission ot lay straight...

    FINALLY - I purposfully cut it crooked...meaning I made it a wonky rectangle....I attached a ribbon to the top 2 corners - gave it to my Mom and told her it was a wrap quilt to tie around her shoulders and neck and was crooked because that's what the pattern called for and I wasn't sure if I liked it or not but hoped she did! She LOVES it!

    I have decided when the fabric has a mind of its own and doesn't do what I want it to - to change my perspective and decide its perfect and exactly how I wanted it and then I become completely happy with it!

    Hang in there - when you've beat it into submission and it is tea towel size that's when you have to worry!

  18. #43
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    How warped is it? If it is severely warped, you need to take the warped part out and resew the pieces together. If it is only a little bit warped, taking a extra deeper or shallower seam in the warped area should do it. If it is only slightly warped, pressing might help. If you want to hammer it into place, you would likely want to get the special mallet made for using on fabrics. I can't remember what the name of the tool is, but it came out a few years ago especially for making intersections flatter where several seams came together. If you do not want to purchase the special fabric mallet, you would be better off purchasing a regular rubber headed mallet from the tool section, rather than using a hammer. The metal head of a hammer would be a bit hard on your fabric.

  19. #44
    Moz
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    Greetings. I love all the suggestions and they are what I do when trying to flatten a wavy border on a quilt before trying to topstitch it on a longarm.

    What I often try to mention is the reason for the waves. Usually it is that a border has been added to the outside of the quilt without measuring the interior of the quilt and applying the border to that measurement easing in the excess.

    I often take off these outer borders and shorten them easing in the excess there. It's easier to do that than to flatten an extremely wavy border.

    Other times the waves are caused by bias and you'll see that a lot in quilts placed on point. Often times the only remedy for an on point wavy quilt is to add extra borders and ease in the edges.

    If the waves aren't too extreme the steaming can help a great deal as well as hand basting the edges and pulling in your excess. Often times just using a very long stitch on you machine and sewing 1/4" in from the edge will bring the waves in enough to quilt out your excess once you are quilting your top. If you measure the interior length of your quilt top and then measure the outer edge of your border you'll see just how much you have to ease in. I've had them with 3" excess...those were the ones I redid the borders on :).

    Are you quilting it on a frame or in hoops. Hoops and a thicker batting can do wonders. Good luck :).

  20. #45
    Super Member brenda21's Avatar
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    I asked her once before and the little guy in her avatar is a baby squirrel that she raised after mama left him.

  21. #46
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    I went and had my nails done...told my husband I would be back by 2 - I walked in the door at 2:03 and he said "I thought you would be back at 2?"

    I said I am - at least by the clock in my car!!!

  22. #47
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    Unstitch the area immediately around the warp, then
    literally take a 'dart' in the wavy piece, with the excess fabric folded to the back and a nice flat fold line on top, like we used to do making blouses or fitted skirt tops.
    Gently press the dart flat, being careful to not stretch the dart, and topstitch closely along the fold line on top.
    If the wave covers the whole piece, it was probably stretched so then you just make a little fold down the whole piece, and when it's topstitched, it just looks like it was seamed there on purpose. If anyone comments, say you had to piece it there. We all understand piecing to get enough to be able to cut that block! :o)

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