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Thread: What is this machine, and is it appropriate for quilting?

  1. #51
    Super Member Barb_MO's Avatar
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    Your machine would be wonderful for piecing.

    Quote Originally Posted by ailene View Post
    Looks like an industrial sewing machine much like the brother I have now. I was tempted to quilt my quilts on it but when my sis and I checked it out, it sews so fast I can hardly keep up. I am selling mine because I never use it. I bought one of Ken Lund's set ups he advertised on facebook to try to quilt my quilts with. I think if you can figure out how to slow it down, you might be able to sew on it but not freehand. Also, straight stitch only.

  2. #52
    Senior Member Pepita's Avatar
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    I thought the fast machines were the favored ones for free motion quilting. I think you have to use what works. It may have some plates or documentation on the bottom of the machine. It does look like an industrial machine. Upholstery, and leather need tougher machines. Upholstery and leather also need big needles. I'd just play with it and see what you think. Maybe your husband will craft the other corner of the table for you and your machine. That way you can both use it.
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  3. #53
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    can you show a picture of the needle and foot?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  4. #54
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    That table is to die for!!!
    Heartgirl

  5. #55
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    I would try sewing on it.

  6. #56
    Member piecNpat's Avatar
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    Go for it...at least once!
    Pat

  7. #57
    Super Member running1's Avatar
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    What machine??? All I see is a fabulous table!!!
    "... let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us."

  8. #58
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    I have an industrial Singer sewing machine that I quilt on. also use it to do my Jean quilt piecing on. great sewing table he has made.
    Freedom is costly and quilting keeps us busy...

  9. #59
    Senior Member Bamagal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter View Post
    Throw together a practice piece and give it a whirl. Just grab any two pieces of fabric and some batting. Nothing fancy is required for trying it out. If you get good stitches that make you happy, it's good to go. If it's a hot mess you have not lost anything by trying.
    Good answer!! Never hurts to try!!

  10. #60
    Junior Member pinkypig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chasing Hawk View Post
    That machine isn't really meant to sew lighter fabrics. I had the same set in my shop for 20+ years.
    It will sew it, but it won't like it...lol It may chew on it a bit too. Now if you wanted to sew a few layers of leather or vinyl and most upholstery materials this one would work.

    Kinda looks like a Consew or possibly a Juki.
    Chasing Hawk u get the prize - it is a Juki, just like the one I have, and it does not like lighter fabrics, no way to drop the feed dogs either
    Dogs: GodÂ’s way of showing us how to be HAPPY. - Anonymous

  11. #61
    Super Member callen's Avatar
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    Wow, what a fantastic table !!! I want one - can we put in our orders???? LOL
    Dance like no one is watching

  12. #62
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    It has a built in walking foot and feed dogs...for Stitch in the ditch and straight lines..would work well, especially with that huge table (and yes, I want a table like that!). I used to do reupholstery...and had a larger (18" throat) machine like this one...they move FAST!..very fast...even over and through fingers, fingernails and bone...oh, yeah they will.

    For freehand stitching (feathers, curls, etc.), not so great...unless there is a way to put the feed dogs down, and put a foot on there that will let you do free motion. There is a spring looking foot (it looks just like the spring on the tension adjustment...a cone shaped spring) that you can get to help protect your fingers...old school...but maybe an industrial machine shop has some...folks do quilt sofa fabrics on these.
    One other attachment you can probably get for this...a binding attachment..to attach bias binding...now that could be a time saver!


    Quote Originally Posted by Teeler View Post
    I'm still debating on the logistics of quilting my first quilt, and haven't decided yet if I really want to send it out. I really want to be able to do it start-to-finish on my own (I think).

    My DH has this machine. He bought it from a local commercial seamstress, and it doesn't seem to have any details on it. Is it the type of machine that could do something like a quilt, or is it more for 'heavy duty' sewing? (It was used mostly for heavy commercial fabrics like vinyl and canvas, which is what he'll be using it for). Maybe it's not something I can use? Oh, by the way, do you not LOVE the new table he just built?! I'm totally jealous.

    Attachment 394165
    Attachment 394166
    Marge Campbell
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  13. #63
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    Looks like a Tacsew or Juki maybe...both make industrial grade machines.
    Marge Campbell
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  14. #64
    Senior Member Judi in Ohio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teeler View Post
    I'm still debating on the logistics of quilting my first quilt, and haven't decided yet if I really want to send it out. I really want to be able to do it start-to-finish on my own (I think).

    My DH has this machine. He bought it from a local commercial seamstress, and it doesn't seem to have any details on it. Is it the type of machine that could do something like a quilt, or is it more for 'heavy duty' sewing? (It was used mostly for heavy commercial fabrics like vinyl and canvas, which is what he'll be using it for). Maybe it's not something I can use? Oh, by the way, do you not LOVE the new table he just built?! I'm totally jealous.

    Attachment 394165
    Attachment 394166
    I think this is just a commercial machine - can't see the badge so don't know the name. Many people use these as quilting machines. It is really fast, you'll have to get used to it, but it will be worth it I think. Find out the brand and call them. I bet you can adjust them if need be.
    Judi in Ohio

  15. #65
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    It was set up for drapery...so with a 40wt thread...even a 35wt, both top and bobbin, and a size 16 or 18 needle (probably has a 21 or 22 in it with Nylon thread, prob 25 or 30wt)...I'd test it out and try it. Remember though it's probably 10-20 times faster than a home machine...as fast as you say "zip" 2 feet of seam is sewn......takes practice...but you can do it.

    I sewed a "boot" that was made of twenty-two 7" circles, with a 3-1/2" diameter hole in the centers on mine. They ended looking like an accordian...so they would spring back and forth along with the hydrolic shaft of some very large machines. You can sew circles if very careful...but not freehand...you could mark the quilt with large designs and follow those lines...I would not hesitate to try it. That walking foot may be a blessing on quilts.

    Also...that big table...very helpful when doing tuck n roll upholstery, stitching diamond tuck, and would be great support for quilts. I used to make the tuck n roll a lot, even for furniture fabrics (velvets)...called those channels though..too wide to be tuck n roll. Does your hubby do auto restorations?

    The two memory quilts I'm working on are from a classic car restorer's clothes...paint spots desired, lol. I just embroidered a dragonfly on some very heavy auto leather for these quilts...came out very nicely on my 12 needle machine.


    Quote Originally Posted by Teeler View Post
    Boat interiors/seats/upholstery...canvas work like pop up campers...furniture cushions...
    Marge Campbell
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  16. #66
    Junior Member sandyquilts's Avatar
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    Commercial machine

    Quote Originally Posted by Holice View Post
    I believe you can get a modified foot peddle that better controls the speed on the commercial machines
    If it is a commercial machine, it has only one stitch type. Since your husband will use it, I assume it sews a straight stitch. It also sews so incredibly fast, check it to see if you can use it comfortably. Certainly, the needle will have to be changed to one for your use.
    SandyQuilter (I am not sandyquilts)
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  17. #67
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    I have a machine like that - not as smart and I sure could have used that table. I used it for making loose covers when I had a business making curtains, covers, etc. I still keep it though I don't use it very often and althought I did quilt a quilt on it for a client, I would not recommend it! I should say that it is what we in England would call 'an industrial'.
    Last edited by Lynette-Merlin; 02-11-2013 at 01:47 PM. Reason: I forgot to mention the industrial!

  18. #68
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    I don't recognize the machine but that is a great table for quilting. Wish I had one like it.

  19. #69
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    Love that table. Wish I had room for one like it. Since the garage was converted to living space even before we bought the house, there is no room for such a wonderfully large table.
    Happy quilting Grandma

  20. #70
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    I can't imagine why you couldn't do whatever sewing you wanted---------as long as you can find needles the size you need.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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  21. #71
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teeler View Post
    mgm- don't even talk to me about where the cars are. My car hasn't seen the inside of the garage...well, maybe ONE time. He's always got some project going in there. Usually it involves fixing someone ELSE's vehicle...
    He's got this whole thing built on casters so he can wheel it around/outside if he needs to, and the machine is also on wheels and slides right into that space. The middle section will store his fabric rolls/bolts.

    How clever. I had not noticed the sewing machine table was independent of the working table. Something like that might be workable with a couple folding tables with a bit of modification.
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  22. #72
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    I made tables up out of old bathroom cabinets - we put the cabinets on 2 X 4s and then put locking wheels on the the 2X4s, then braced the top with 2X4s for a couple old metal parts out of an obsolete telephone system cabinet - plywood or doors would work. It was nice to be able to move the cabinets around as needed. I also had it hinged so one end would raise if I wanted to use gravity to help feed things through the machine. I could also use the table on wheels to roll the material through the machine. Oh and I could put stuff in the cabinets and drawers. I was making historical type tents and awnings. The biggest awning was 24 X 100 those tables did it all.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  23. #73
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    Well, DH found the paperwork after a week...survey SAYS...
    Mercury M-280L Compound needle feed walking-foot sewing machine

    "Can be adjusted to sew from light to heavy fabrics and leather. Presser feet are interchangeable with standard Singer type 111w feet and attachments."
    Says speed is adjustable, too. Cool. I haven't touched it yet, but I guess this answers a lot of the questions. I'll let you know how it works out if I get to actually use it

    Exploded parts chart is REALLY ugly

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