Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28

Thread: What to pick for the first project?

  1. #1
    Moose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    87
    It's me again, the greenie :P

    If it were your very first project on the machine, what would you pick so you could learn on your own?

    I won't be able to enlist physical help b/c I have a little one and I'm too pooped at night to go for a class right now. I have a couple of must does, but I want to then back track and do it from the start to learn.

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Senior Member quiltingbee12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    671
    I would start with either a simple nine-patch, or something that doesn't have points.
    I made my first quilt with 8 inch squares grouped in a color.
    You might try that.
    Do something you would like. And get familiar with your machine first.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,087
    I would get an Eleanor Burns Quilt in a Day book or a Terri Atkinson pattern. Both have very good, accurate, clear instructions and illustrations.

  4. #4
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    I would do this one:

    [IMG]http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z.../28b-TradP.jpg[/IMG]

    Just kidding! I have this pattern but haven't even attempted to start it. I love looking at it though.

    My first quilt was a simple log cabin. It's a great pattern for a beginner and looks great even with a few opps.


  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Maryville, Tn
    Posts
    1,791
    I would do a simple rail fence.. 3 stripes per block, 6" blocks.. very simple, but very pretty and you can add your own touch by how you set the blocks and the colors you use.

  6. #6
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    ELVERTA, CA
    Posts
    15,274
    Blog Entries
    1
    BellaBoo you are funny. That picture made my heart sink. lol

    I did a basic rail fence as an early project. It limits the number of fabrics, and you can practice all the parts of making a pieced top. The result looks more difficult than it is.

    http://www.equilters.com/library/qui...ail_fence.html

  7. #7
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,958
    I did simple squares with fussy cut princesses for my first one. A log cabin is a good choice too.

  8. #8
    Super Member gcathie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southeast, Ohio
    Posts
    3,270
    BellaBoo.....

    I would do this one:

    Just kidding! I have this pattern but haven't even attempted to start it. I love looking at it though.
    My first quilt was a simple log cabin. It's a great pattern for a beginner and looks great even with a few opps.



    Now that was too funny......lol.....just couldn't resist huh.....my kinda ....lol...... I bet her eyes did this number :shock: ....lol......:-) :lol:



    I would do a four patch...like Beverly's.....


  9. #9
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    14,519
    I don't know ... That warm wishes seems even easier than the log cabin! I too made a log cabin for my first quilt by elenore burns. Back then you tore the strips and sewed your heart out for the day and had it done. It is a good first for beginners because there is so many settings you can go with to make it different than anyone else's. Very fun and she explains it perfectly in her book. She is on line and sells her books and rulers.

  10. #10
    Super Member eparys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    2,230
    So far you have had lots of good suggestions.

    I did a Quilt in a Day Log Cabin for my first quilt. It was fun and straight forward. Directions were clear and easy to follow. I backed it with flannel and tied it. Twenty five years later, it still is on my son's bed.

  11. #11
    Super Member Barb M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mission, BC
    Posts
    2,143
    Oh i agree with the warm wishes quilt, i've never done one, but there's one in the photo section right now, that looks so gorgeous, but so easy, here is a link to it:

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/19177.page

  12. #12
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,942
    Blog Entries
    1
    I always think rail fence is a great first quilt. For a second quilt, I would recommend log cabin. These quilts don't require matching seams, which is the most difficult skill to acquire IMO, but let you practice all of the other skills -- accurate cutting and sewing, making a sandwich, basting, quilting, binding. For a third quilt I would recommend a largish 9-patch, which requires matching seams. Fourth quilt would be Warm Wishes, which requires cutting up a 9-patch and matching even more seams. After that, anything goes!

  13. #13
    Super Member Barb M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mission, BC
    Posts
    2,143
    oh prism, warm wishes is rail fence blocks, alternated with a plain block, unless theres another warm wishes i dont know about

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,942
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb M
    oh prism, warm wishes is rail fence blocks, alternated with a plain block, unless theres another warm wishes i dont know about
    :oops: You're right! I was thinking of the double 9-patch.

    Also, rail fence and log cabin *do* require matching seams when you sew the blocks together! It's just that you don't have to match seams within the blocks, which means there is much less matching of seams required.

    These senior moments are the pits!

  15. #15
    Super Member Barb M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mission, BC
    Posts
    2,143
    see now i don't even know what a double 9-patch is, so you know more than me lol :) :)

  16. #16
    Moose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    87
    prism,

    do you have a link for the double 9-patches so I get an idea?

    Not sure what you mean by matching seams b/c it looks to me that you have to match those square perfectly or else when you do the outside... so I guess I am missing something.

    Thanks :)

    --

    Thank you all for the wonderful suggestions. Taking notes.

  17. #17
    Super Member gcathie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southeast, Ohio
    Posts
    3,270
    Moose here is the addy for the one I was suggesting:

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/19126.page

  18. #18
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,942
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Moose
    do you have a link for the double 9-patches so I get an idea?
    Okay, I screwed up again with the name. I meant the disappearing 9-patch rather than the double 9-patch!

    Do you have a beginning quilting book? I really think it is a good idea to have one on hand to help you with techniques, especially if you want to learn strip-piecing (what most of us use to speed up the process of making blocks).

    Here is a link to a picture tutorial on how to make a double 9-patch by means of strip piecing. A 9-patch quilt is composed of just 9-patch blocks; a double 9-patch alternates 9-patch blocks with plain squares.
    http://tinyurl.com/cd7w9k

    Here is a link to a picture tutorial on how to make a disappearing 9-patch. For this one, you make a large 9-patch block and then cut the block and rearrange the pieces.
    http://tinyurl.com/ccn6hn

    The fewer seams in a block that need to be matched, the easier the blocks are to put together. With a rail fence pattern, the first time you need to match seams is when you sew one row of blocks to the next row; you just need to match the block seams. When you make a 9-patch block, you already have to match seams inside the block when you attach row 2 to row 1, row 3 to row 2, and then you still have all the block seams to match when you sew row 2 of the quilt to row 1 of the quilt.

    What I was trying to say, in my senior moment way, was that the easiest quilt will have a block pattern that does not require matching seams within the block. Rail fence is like that.

  19. #19
    Moose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    87
    Thank you for the links and clarification.

    I was also told that the yellow brick road would be a good first project. Any opinions?

    TIA

  20. #20
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,942
    Blog Entries
    1
    I don't think you can go wrong with a Yellow Brick Road done in blues and yellows for a first project (unless, like me, you have a husband who doesn't like yellow!).

  21. #21
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,227
    Use El Burns methods that use oversize then cut to size. You cant go wrong that way.
    Two and a half inch half square triangles have so many design uses that they are a great way to learn.
    Take 2 fabrics, one light one dark. Cut into 6 in squares and put them togather right sides facing.
    Draw an X corner to corner then sew 1/4 inch on each side of line.
    Cut in half at the 3 in measure on both sides of square +. Then cut on drawn lines. You will have 8 over size half sqs that you trim to 2 1/2 inch squares.
    Put them togather however you want to make an 8 1/2 square. 8 inch
    finished in quilt.
    Be sure and watch lots of videos on http://www.quilterstv.com

  22. #22
    sunnyhope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    443
    It would be great if you posted pictures of what patterns you suggest so us newbies and me daft newbie,lol would know what your talking about :wink:
    thank you for taking the time to do so

  23. #23
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,227
    This is a basic star block using half square triangles. There are so many different ways to use them. Just play with them till you like the design.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  24. #24
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,227
    Go into the Pictures menu and click on WIP I am working on now. It is another way to use half square triangles.
    You can also combine squares with HQT for even more patterns.

  25. #25
    Moose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Marie
    Use El Burns methods that use oversize then cut to size. You cant go wrong that way.

    Be sure and watch lots of videos on http://www.quilterstv.com
    Hello Rose Marie,

    Thanks for the picture and the link. I haven't had a chance to look at it; I hope the method you speak of is there as well b/c I'm not familiar with it or any other for that matter at this point in time. :)

    Is there a place where I can look up the acronyms? Not familiar with them yet either.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.