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Thread: Whole quilt basted with Elmer's school glue

  1. #26
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    I did this project on my oversized second hand melamine dining room table. Width of my quilt was the same as the length of my table (happy coincidence). I layed down batting first and than the quilt on top. I put row of pins through the middle just to split the quilt in two smaller pieces. I flipped the top over, all the way to the pins and applied glue on the batting in dots and thin lines, just randomly. I flipped the top back down and smoothed it with my hands. I did not use iron but I assume it wold be faster if I did. When the glue was dry, I repeated the same with the second half of the quilt. Instructions on the glue bottle say that it is fully dried in 24 hours, so I let I dry overnight and than repeated the same with the backing. Just as an experiment I used Elmer's Glue-All in one corner to see if it will wash out. I will be quilting it in a few hours so I will post how it is holding up.

  2. #27
    Super Member PenniF's Avatar
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    this is not specifically about the whole quilt but the glue coming out...i've been using dots of the washable Elmer's for some time to match points and seams - and sometimes i like to press seams open afterward. A single spritz of water from my spray bottle on the glued spots and the seams open up - and there is no sign of residue.

  3. #28
    Super Member PenniF's Avatar
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    PS....i have also heard the ratio of 1 part glue to 3 parts water (vs the 1:1 in an earlier post) for making a spray glue....but have not experiented with this yet....gluing the quilt sandwich had never occurred to me til i heard it here....but i'm trying it on my next one for sure !!

  4. #29
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    I am definitely subscribing to this thread to see how your quilt turns out! Good luck!

  5. #30
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    I would like to know how it works out.

  6. #31
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    Hope it goes well!
    Liz Fairlie

  7. #32
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    Will try with next quilt! Thanks for letting us know how it works!

  8. #33
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    I use the purple glue sticks for binding. That is safe to use. I am not sure about the white liquid washable glue.

  9. #34
    Senior Member COYOTEMAGIC's Avatar
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    I've been using School Glue (not just Elmer's) to baste quilts for a few years now, LOVE IT!!! Just remember if you let it set for any extended time you may get some yellowing where the glue is, but mine has washed out with NO permanent staining.

  10. #35
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    I'm anxious to hear the results of this experiment. I am assuming that you need to get the quilt quilted quickly and wash it?

  11. #36
    Super Member Midwestmary's Avatar
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    Wow! We've come a long way from the days when I would crawl around on my knees pin basting Can't wait to try this - I've always avoided the sprays as they are toxic to my Cockatiels. I definitely will be trying this. Thanks for the info!

  12. #37
    Senior Member aeble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midwestmary View Post
    Wow! We've come a long way from the days when I would crawl around on my knees pin basting
    Guess who just spent an hour crawling around on the floor pin basting a quilt. Guess I should have read my quilting board stuff this morning instead of jumping into the sewing.

    I'm really interested in hearing how it turns out.
    "If you have built castles in the air, your work will not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them." --Henry David Thoreau

  13. #38
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ontheriver View Post
    I have done this with lap size quilts, just finished one last week. They quilt up just fine and I have not had a problem, but I do iron my some to set the glue. What I do is lay out the batting, put the backing over it right side up, then I roll or fold the backing so I have a strip going across one end. I put the glue on backing then unroll that part and smooth it out, do the next section showing and unroll and smooth, when all done I start in the middle and press it to set and make sure there are no wrinkles or puckers. The iron dries it great, then I flip it over and do the same with the top. Works great.
    Thanks for this tip. I'm going to bookmark it so that in a couple of days when I need it I can refresh my memory.
    jean

  14. #39
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Please let us know how it worked for you. I tried it the other day on a small piece
    and it looked like a mess so I gave up. I always use Elmer's on my binding but
    basting a 20" square didn't work. I glued the backing to the batting, smooth out
    and pressed. I got lots of puckers so I was afraid to carry on. Maybe I did
    something wrong but it's back to thread basting for me.

  15. #40
    Senior Member COYOTEMAGIC's Avatar
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    I've never used an iron to "set" the glue or anything like that. I use a thin line of glue and then just MASH it when I lay the batting over the backing, let it set for a bit, then run thin lines of glue in perpendicular to the last glue lines, MASH the top onto the batting. Then just leave it to dry for an hour or so. Ironing is too much work for me!

  16. #41
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
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    Tashana - How did it come out. Was it awful, or awesome, or just OK?
    Bev
    My initials are BB, so dublb is double B.

  17. #42
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    I have used the Elmer's glue for about a year now. I use it to put my binding in place, no pins! It is much easier to deal with. I just love using it. But, I do hit it with a hot iron, as recommended, and that helps to keep it in place better. Great stuff!

  18. #43
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    Never heard nor have I ever tried this. It sounds great. I sure hope you post the finished result. Elmer's glue is really cheap right now because of the back to school sales. Look forward to seeing your finished quilt. Will you wash it when completed?

  19. #44
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    I have quilted about 1/3 of the quilt and I have mixed feelings. The glue is holding up great, no issues whatsoever. But, there is always but in there somewhere, I think that I did not stretch my backing enough. I do not have any puckers (yet) but it is still early. I am not giving up. I will finish this quilt and then try to do it better next time. I read that many of you have done this successfully so there is still hope. I have to remember to stretch the backing better next time. I will post back when I am done, with pictures of course. Stay glued!

  20. #45
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tashana View Post
    I have quilted about 1/3 of the quilt and I have mixed feelings. The glue is holding up great, no issues whatsoever. But, there is always but in there somewhere, I think that I did not stretch my backing enough. I do not have any puckers (yet) but it is still early. I am not giving up. I will finish this quilt and then try to do it better next time. I read that many of you have done this successfully so there is still hope. I have to remember to stretch the backing better next time. I will post back when I am done, with pictures of course. Stay glued!
    I tried this recently on a baby quilt. There were a few puckers when I finished sandwiching, so I took the steam iron to the back and smoothed them out from the middle. It worked like a charm, and it is now as smooth as a baby's bottom! I think I love this technique.

  21. #46
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    After reading about this, on the QB, I've also been using the Elmer's School Glue, for basting. I took the advice of laying out the batting first, then smoothing the fabric, on top of that. The batting doesn't shift, as fabric would. Also as suggested, I then fold back half of the fabric (at a time), drizzle the glue onto the batting (lots of thin lines/swirls), then fold the fabric back and pat it into place. If I use the iron, I hold it to the fabric, for a few seconds, then move on. I don't actually "press" it, just lightly hold the iron to the fabric. This seems to work better (for me, anyway) than pressing.
    I've only tried this, with Warm & White batting. Has anyone tried it, with the higher loft poly batting?
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  22. #47
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Keep going Tashana, you'll get there. [your little person in your avatar makes me smile a lot].

    Linda

    Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost but now am found, was blind, but now I see.
    [John Newton (1725-1807)]

    http://sewextremeseams.blogspot.com/

  23. #48
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    I tried basting with Elmers washable glue only once and it spotted the white border. What do you suppose I did wrong. Oh, and it didn't wash out the spots. May give it another try. will keep watch.

  24. #49
    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neesie View Post
    After reading about this, on the QB, I've also been using the Elmer's School Glue, for basting. I took the advice of laying out the batting first, then smoothing the fabric, on top of that. The batting doesn't shift, as fabric would. Also as suggested, I then fold back half of the fabric (at a time), drizzle the glue onto the batting (lots of thin lines/swirls), then fold the fabric back and pat it into place. If I use the iron, I hold it to the fabric, for a few seconds, then move on. I don't actually "press" it, just lightly hold the iron to the fabric. This seems to work better (for me, anyway) than pressing.
    I've only tried this, with Warm & White batting. Has anyone tried it, with the higher loft poly batting?
    Neesie, I had some "cheap" poly batting that I bought off a roll. No idea what brand or anything. I tried it on a quilt that I worked on, and it just wouldn't stick to that quilt top. I couldn't get anything to stick to it!! I assumed it was because it was polyester batting. I used some scrap batting and tried gluing it to another top for trapunto and it worked fine! I probably used too much and it got very stiff, but since I'm not quilting that part, it is ok. When I sprayed it with water to get markings off, it softened up a lot. I'm assuming that it lost the bond too.
    You can have any design you want. As long as it's loops!

  25. #50
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyR View Post
    Neesie, I had some "cheap" poly batting that I bought off a roll. No idea what brand or anything. I tried it on a quilt that I worked on, and it just wouldn't stick to that quilt top. I couldn't get anything to stick to it!! I assumed it was because it was polyester batting. I used some scrap batting and tried gluing it to another top for trapunto and it worked fine! I probably used too much and it got very stiff, but since I'm not quilting that part, it is ok. When I sprayed it with water to get markings off, it softened up a lot. I'm assuming that it lost the bond too.
    I've had to wet a glued area, to smooth it out, and was able to just touch it with the iron again, to re-bond it. Wonder why nothing would stick to that quilt top. Odd! Had you used any starch on it? Could that have been the culprit?
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

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