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Thread: Why miter the borders?

  1. #51
    Senior Member redpurselady's Avatar
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    OK - I'm confused. Are we talking about borders or binding? Can't see a way around not mitering binding unless you rounded off the corners and cut your binding on the bias.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    Quote Originally Posted by Terryl
    I don't know how to attach binding without mitering, could someone please post a photo of an unmitered binding? I can't seem to picture it in my mind. Thank-you.

    T.
    Borders and binding are two different things. I rarely miter borders and always miter bindings.
    Sorry, I guess I mis-read topic

  3. #53
    Senior Member kclausing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terryl
    I don't know how to attach binding without mitering, could someone please post a photo of an unmitered binding? I can't seem to picture it in my mind. Thank-you.

    T.
    If you use the backing as the binding, you don't have to miter the binding. It all depends how you fold it over.

  4. #54
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I agree personal preference. Mine is to miter since I learned how and it is easier to me than the other way. I used the Better Homes and Gardens reference book. It has actual photographs.

  5. #55
    Super Member dungeonquilter's Avatar
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    I occaisionally miter corners, if the fabric seems to require it. Other wise, I don't. On my last quilt, I mitered the two inner borders together as one was a stripe, and did the outer border square.

  6. #56
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    It's not necessary to always miter corners. Some quilts call for it. Some don't. Don't ever be afraid of miters. They are easy if you start first with scraps.

  7. #57
    Super Member trisha's Avatar
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    I went to a huge quilt show today,,and catching up on reading this post tonite....ya know....there were about 150 quilts and display and I was so busy looking at the beauty of them, I don't remember looking at one binding. Never noticed if they were straight or mitred. Go figure!!

  8. #58
    Lady Shivesa's Avatar
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    I've never mitered a corner before - it just never occurred to me that it was a possibility. Unfortunately I'm going to have to attempt it soon as I made one of those french braid table runners and wanted to put a border on it. I'm really, really dreading it especially since there's some angles that aren't 45 degrees. =/

  9. #59
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    Some fabrics are just made to miter like stripes, but if it is a overall pattern I don't

  10. #60
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    How do you do your corners? Show a picture, please. I have gathered around a corner & also my own method to Miter. Sometimes I use a half miter.

  11. #61
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    I only miter borders when using a pattern that can "turn the corner". Or striped fabric where I can make it meet to turn the corner. Use strips on sides then top and bottom most of the time. Personal choice here. One can always use the fabric cut off when mitering for scrap quilts. Personal choice.

  12. #62
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    I find it a bit easier to starch the corners heavily before making a miter so it lies flatter.

  13. #63
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    Don't miter the corners, but I do miter the corners on the binding. Was watching a judge at the county fair. If your binding was not mitered she just put the quilt aside and would not consider it for a ribbon.

  14. #64
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    You know what's so funny! Hearing about that judge passing on unmitered binding. We should send her to the quilt museum in Paducah! Let her judge all the beautiful antique quilts there and see how many she would give a ribbon to!

    I remember my first jean quilt, I did not know how to put binding on and I did a really bad job of it. Later, when I learned how, I tried to get the quilt back from my then 13 year old son. He told me to keep my mitts off his quilt! He didn't care that the binding wasn't put on and that the quilt police might give me a ticket! He loved his quilt just the way it was. He got a big kick out of helping me tie his quilt.

    I bet the quilt police really don't approve of "tieing" quits either. When I was a kid, that's the only way we did it. When machine quilting started being so popular, the quilting police had to relent and some, to this day, will still claim it's not a real quilt unless it's hand quilted!

  15. #65
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    This is a picture of a miter from my tutorial at http://blog.caronmosey.com/2009/12/t...er-corner.html . It is the final step of the miter process, but before the excess fabric is trimmed off the back after sewing the miter.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayelee
    I dont miter my borders becuse it overwhelms me I just cant figure out how
    How do you go around the edges of the quilt without mitering the corners

  17. #67
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I agree...personal choice depending on the fabric in the border. Sometimes I do...sometimes I don't.

  18. #68
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackberry
    Quote Originally Posted by jayelee
    I dont miter my borders becuse it overwhelms me I just cant figure out how
    How do you go around the edges of the quilt without mitering the corners
    Borders are the unpieced fabrics around the center pieced blocks. Bindings go around the edge of the quilt to finish it off. Two different things.

  19. #69
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlwaysQuilting
    I rarely miter the corners on my quilts.
    I knew a Mennonite and she got me hooked on making quilts.
    She didn't miter her corners. She said it's worldly and a waste of fabric, and they try not to waste anything. That made sense to me.
    So to this day I don't miter unless someone requests it.
    Am I the minority? Do you always miter your corners?
    "Worldly"?!
    Point of view is a strange thing, isn't it.
    Mitered borders generally look more polished, skilled, "finished," professional, in my view.

    If I'm applying more than one border, and I usually do, then I sew all the border strips together first and apply to the top as one unit, with mitered corners done in one step. If I'm using a large print, I can often plan the print placement in the corners with a miter, which creates a complete pattern -- such as a full flower not cut off in the middle of a bloom.

    Use a long ruler with a 45 degree angle line on it. Pin. Mark your miter line. Pin. Sew the first couple corners with a larger basting stitch. Check it out; if it works, then resew and trim.

    [Basting prevents the frustration of reverse sewing a long tightly sewn seam if you find you've mitered the wrong direction and have made a fitted sheet instead of a flat quilt!] I taught myself to miter; you can too. Go for it!

    Jan in VA

  20. #70
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    My very first quilt had mitered borders because that is how the instructions in the book read. I am glad because it taught me the process. I like the look of pieced borders and cornerstones as well. So now I only miter if I am using a border fabric with a print that calls for it, like a stripe of some sort, or as many here have also posted, when I have multiple borders it is sometimes easier to sew the borders together and then miter them on. Always it is dependent on if I have enough of my border fabric. I tend to buy fabric and stash and then choose a quilt pattern. This has bitten me in the behind more times then I care to admit and of course by the time I end up making the quilt out of said stash the fabric is several years old and impossible to find more of. You'd think I'd learn. Well I guess I have, when stash building I just buy more yardage :lol:

  21. #71
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    Eleanor Burns has a terrific video on how to mitre corners. She does a fabulous job of explaining it, and you can also watch her as she does it. I don't know if it's just the way she does it, but I found it easy to follow. If you screw up, you can go back to the video and check it again and again and again, if need be, but I don't think more than a couple of times is necessary.

  22. #72
    Senior Member foxxigrani's Avatar
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    I tried to miter a border once, the corner ended up about two inches away from the corner. If that makes sense lol.
    Nope not something I do.

    I love the look of them tho, and wish I could.

    Buttt.
    can't so won't.

    Rita

  23. #73
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlwaysQuilting
    I rarely miter the corners on my quilts.
    I knew a Mennonite and she got me hooked on making quilts.
    She didn't miter her corners. She said it's worldly and a waste of fabric, and they try not to waste anything. That made sense to me.
    So to this day I don't miter unless someone requests it.
    Am I the minority? Do you always miter your corners?
    I only miter if I'm using a striped border that looks "chopped off" if I don't. With stripes, the miter ends up looking more finished - sort of like a picture frame.

  24. #74
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    No matter if you miter a corner or use the folding method, which looks like a miter or if you stop and start the binding at each corner, the process will use up fabric. If possible, I round off the corners, mostly on baby or children's quilts and sew the binding around the corner. Saves time and fabric. Try it.

    Carol J.

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayelee
    I dont miter my borders becuse it overwhelms me I just cant figure out how
    I agree. I have watched several tuts and still cannot figure it out.
    It is also the end of the quilt and am afraid I will make a mistake and ruin the quilt.
    So no mitering for me.

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