Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 68

Thread: WHY are quilt bindings cut on the BIAS

  1. #1
    Power Poster dreamer2009's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    WHERE THE SUN ALWAYS SHINES
    Posts
    10,097
    Blog Entries
    7
    Can someone explain this to me please...

  2. #2
    Super Member sidmona's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Milton, Georgia
    Posts
    2,739
    I read somewhere that the only time you need to cut binding on the bias is when you are going to be binding curves. Otherwise, you can straight cut the fabric width wise.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    in retirement
    Posts
    1,513
    Blog Entries
    3
    I only cut on the bias when I do a scallop edge,, otherwise on straight of grain.

  4. #4
    Senior Member darlin121's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Smiths Station,Alabama
    Posts
    852
    I feel the bias bindings a tougher than the ones cut on the grain. They have more give, I think. IMHO

  5. #5
    Senior Member katybob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    810
    I've been told that bindings cut on the bias last longer.

  6. #6
    Super Member JenniePenny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    4,532
    Quote Originally Posted by sidmona
    I read somewhere that the only time you need to cut binding on the bias is when you are going to be binding curves. Otherwise, you can straight cut the fabric width wise.
    That is what I believe also. When binding is on the bias, you will be able to gently stretch it and shape it around the curves.
    There is less 'give' in straight binding.

    But straight grain binding is just fine for straight quilts. It has enough strength because it is double folded. IMHO.

  7. #7
    Super Member gale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North-Central Indiana
    Posts
    4,646
    Blog Entries
    1
    Here's a blog post that explains the differences between bias and straight of grain binding:
    http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/2011/01...cs-part-1.html

    and here's part 2 where she shows how to make bias binding:
    http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/2011/02...rt-2-bias.html

    I am going to try making my next quilt with rounded corners and use bias binding. I don't really like mitering corners.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    150
    Binding cut on the bias is more flexible and therefore it's easier to make it look nice when you fold it over and stitch it down. It's also easier (for me at least) to make nicer mitered corners with bias binding.

  9. #9
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,278
    According to Barbara Brackman, reknown quilt historian, bias binding was rarely, if ever, seen on quilts prior to the scalloped-edge quilts of the 1920-1930s.

    I prefer the look, feel, handling, and strength of double fold (aka French fold) binding with mitered, hand-turned, handsewn corners.

    But, as you can see, it's a purely personal preference.

    Jan in VA (quilting nearly 30 years.)

  10. #10
    Super Member Fiber Artist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Colorful Colorado
    Posts
    2,006
    Quote Originally Posted by sidmona
    I read somewhere that the only time you need to cut binding on the bias is when you are going to be binding curves. Otherwise, you can straight cut the fabric width wise.
    thats what I do :thumbup: :D

  11. #11
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    7,302
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by dreamer2009
    Can someone explain this to me please...
    They are only cut on the bias if you have curves or a scalloped border. Otherwise they can be cut on the straight of the grain. I've NEVER cut bias strips. As a matter of fact, the one time I did a scallopped border, I went out and bought pre-made bias strips and used those.

  12. #12
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    6,771
    The only time I cut my binding on the bias is when I am binding a curve or if i want to use a stripe or plaid and have the bias look. I use a straight width of fabric cut for straight edges.

  13. #13
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,438
    I have never cut on a bias for my binding. I could see if you are going to have scalloped edges it would be better, but not for a square quilt.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,718
    Blog Entries
    1
    If you cut one yard of fabric on the bias by 2-2 1/2 inches you will get yards and yards of binding. Much more than straight of grain. Anyway (Bias binding) that is all I have ever known.

  15. #15
    Super Member olmphoto2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin, South Central
    Posts
    1,037
    This is a good explanation, Gale, of the reason for bias binding. Two of them have to do with strength and durability and the last is for aesthetic reasons.
    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    Here's a blog post that explains the differences between bias and straight of grain binding:
    http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/2011/01...cs-part-1.html

  16. #16
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    The older members of my guild thinks if binding isn't cut on the bias it's not real binding. Bias binding is a pain in the butt to make so I don't make it. I use double fold straight 2 1/2" strips cut with my Go and run it through the Simplicity Binding machine. I have yards of binding in minutes. I think double fold is stronger then bias.

  17. #17
    Super Member gale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North-Central Indiana
    Posts
    4,646
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA
    According to Barbara Brackman, reknown quilt historian, bias binding was rarely, if ever, seen on quilts prior to the scalloped-edge quilts of the 1920-1930s.

    I prefer the look, feel, handling, and strength of double fold (aka French fold) binding with mitered, hand-turned, handsewn corners.

    But, as you can see, it's a purely personal preference.

    Jan in VA (quilting nearly 30 years.)
    When I use bias binding (which I have only done on curved projects so far) I use double fold just as if I was using straight-of-grain binding.

  18. #18
    Super Member olmphoto2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin, South Central
    Posts
    1,037
    The bias binding I make and use is always double fold.

  19. #19
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,734
    Thanks for the question and all the answers since I was wondering also...I never have done curves and always cut on the straight grain...

  20. #20
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,778
    They do not have to be, only if you are doing curves, I cut mine straight grain just fine

  21. #21
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    30,788
    One of the theories behind bias binding is: the threads of the binding are all running at a 45 rather than straight along the edge. This means that the edge of the quilt does not wear out along the edge as fast? I use bias if doing curves. On straight edges, I find that straight binding lays flatter with fewer waves.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wilbur, WA
    Posts
    762
    I like a bias binding if I'm using striped fabric. It gives the stripes a diagonal look, and is more interesting. Otherwise, I only use bias binding if there are curves.

  23. #23
    Jim
    Jim is offline
    Super Member Jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Bardstown, Kentucky
    Posts
    2,189
    I make all my bias bindings..I have a binding machine that requires it...Its stronger that way but, if not using a machine like mine I think its a personal preference.

  24. #24
    Super Member gale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North-Central Indiana
    Posts
    4,646
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I like a bias binding if I'm using striped fabric. It gives the stripes a diagonal look, and is more interesting. Otherwise, I only use bias binding if there are curves.
    Same with plaids and ginghams. They look really nice when cut on the bias.

  25. #25
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,472
    Blog Entries
    1
    Having been a clothing and home dec sewer all my life before starting quilting a couple years ago, I made many many many yards of bias binding. You can get about 9 yards (roughly) of bias binding from a yard of 44" fabric. It makes a beautiful rounded corner which I love for some quilts. I made a silk quilt with a silk velvet backing and made bias of the silk velvet because mitering corners on bulky velvet would be very difficult, I rounded the corners and hand stitched the binding down; it came out beautifully. I had never done straight grain binding till I started quilting; still prefer the bias. You will find as many opinions as there are techniques.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.