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Thread: Wool Jacket Score... Now What?

  1. #26
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    You said you should have read the instructions. Yes, but look at all the info people sent. Great education for many.

  2. #27
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    I was interested to see your answers. I just acquired several yards of lightweight wool fabric. I was thinking of a lap quilt or something, but now I am so confused....to wash, not to wash, cold water/hot water...

  3. #28
    Super Member Glassquilt's Avatar
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    Once the wool has been washed in hot water with soap and thoroughly agitated you won't have to worry about it again.

  4. #29

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    My first lesson was with wool that was second hand and I was practically a baby. I put the quilt together and later; may have been years; washed the thing only to have a few blocks suddenly half the size. What a puckered mess. If I had known I would have washed all and then know the finished size. Now I felt all the time. Most books recommend Ivory soap and definitely no softener. When you felt a sweater or a crocheted item that you make it can get so strong that no pencil can even puncture it. Works great for the handbags I design and make.

  5. #30
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    I take apart old wool clothing and to really felt it you need to boil it and then plunge it into ICE cold water....then boil it again and toss into the washing machine...then a hot dryer! It is labor intensive work, so make sure you know exactly what you are going to use it for before you start taking it all apart!

  6. #31
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    Uh, yeah... That sounds like a LOT of work!! For what I'm planning, I think this one wash will work. I did tug a bit at the edges, and although they were ravelly before washing, no more pulls off now. Thankfully, I don't need to get out the wash kettle or build a fire! I have visions of women out in the yard with a wood paddle in their hand, lol.

  7. #32
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    when i purchase wool jackets to use from thrift stores/yard sales i take them apart- remove buttons- what ever take the linings out- then wash them in hot water- and detergent-rinse in cold water then dry in a hot dryer- then it is ready to use for what ever i'm going to use it for- wool appliques- patchwork- hooked rugs, purses- what ever i am using it for-
    you can also over-dye your wools in you want.
    This is also what I do. The temperature changes shrink the wool but not to the point of felting. I use the resulting fabric for applique and pennyrug type projects. You do NOT need to felt it for applique. Loosely woven herringbones and tweeds are the most likely to fray, but not necessarily. I have very, very little problem with fraying using the method described by ckcowl.

    Wool treated this way before use results in a finished product that can be carefully washed (I use lukewarm) when needed.
    When you get your bundle in the mail compare the fabrics that were hot water washed and dryer dried with the piece of red wool that hadn't been.

  8. #33
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    I take apart old wool clothing and to really felt it you need to boil it and then plunge it into ICE cold water....then boil it again and toss into the washing machine...then a hot dryer! It is labor intensive work, so make sure you know exactly what you are going to use it for before you start taking it all apart!
    In very high end garments you used to see the label: "Boiled Wool" used to describe fabric treated the way you describe, jaci. It was so tight it shed water. Since I no longer look at high end garments, I don't know if that label is still relevant.

  9. #34
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    Felted wool is very dense. The wool fibers shrink and mat together so that they do not ravel. You can use that material to applique small pieces and they to not need to be turned under. Personaly, I think felted wool would not be comfortable in a suit! Good luck with what you decide to do.

  10. #35
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    Be sure to 'deconstruct' the items first! Remove interfacing, pockets, etc, bring it all down to just fabric pieces cuz once it has been felted in hot water you will not be happy if you didn't.

  11. #36
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MisDixie
    I would say from looking at that photo that you want the wool yardage not felted. Check out the little plaid donkey. With felting you wouldn't get the pattern in the wool. Super cute pattern!
    Quote Originally Posted by peaceandjoy
    Wow, talk about showing my lack of knowledge... I don't know! I think I want it felted, but now I'm not sure. It's for wool applique. Pattern is O Holy Night from Under the Garden Moon.

    http://www.underthegardenmoon.com/st...products_id/61
    I don't agree. It can be felted, the plaid donkey could have been made for a plaid jacket etc. Even the large background could have been felted.

    The project will be absolutely delightful in felted wool, IMHO

  12. #37
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    I agree. I cut the jackets apart, remove any interfacing and lining and wash in HOT water, rinse in cold and the throughly dry in the dryer. The reason for this is if you felt the wool it will not unravel. Do Not add fabric softener. You will be very happy with this.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by rexie
    I was interested to see your answers. I just acquired several yards of lightweight wool fabric. I was thinking of a lap quilt or something, but now I am so confused....to wash, not to wash, cold water/hot water...
    you might measure before you wash. if they are washable
    woolens, they will not shrink. the pits when you want them to shrink! I have made quilts with washable wools in 8-10" squares. wash in warm or cool water first, cut, sew. then
    they will be washable later in cool water. In this case, I also
    wash the backing first. poly-down batt is wonderful. warm & natural will shrink too much & is too heavy for wool.
    they are the greatest snuggle quilts.

  14. #39
    Senior Member Johanna Fritz's Avatar
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    I have several hundred pounds of wool that have felted. Look for men's long wool trench coats if you can. I got a man's 6x (yes 6) once for $2.50. Cut out the satin or silk liner. Save if you want. Great for crazy quilts. Cut or pull out any fused stabilizer. Wash in the hottest water possible. Dry in really hot too. NO fabric softener. Will just dull your rotary blades. Try to get 100% wool. Any other fibers and it may not felt...then, have fun.

  15. #40
    a regular here BarbZ's Avatar
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    What if you have a frontload washer? Saw a blip on it but not much else. Thanks for the info.

  16. #41
    Senior Member suzanprincess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarbZ
    What if you have a frontload washer? Saw a blip on it but not much else. Thanks for the info.
    A front loader won't give you the agitation, which is the most important part for felting. Heat will shrink the wool, but it's the agitation that interlocks the fibers to make felt. I tried a sample of knitted wool yarn in with my regular wash in my front loader to see what would happen, and it shrank a tiny bit but did not actually felt. I figured I'd have to make all the knitted bowls I had in mind, and then take them to laundromat or a friend's top loader.

  17. #42
    Super Member Glassquilt's Avatar
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    If it only one small item you can do by hand in a pan of hot, soapy water and stir the daylights out of it yourself. Of course your arms may be exhausted by the time you're done requiring a sit down and a reward of chocolate.

  18. #43
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    The soap does have something to do with the felting. I make jackets and vests of the heavier pieces. So I have a lot of wool of varying thicknesses. I rarely cut them apart before I wash. Some pieces do not shrink at all so just toss them. I use the rib knit at bottom to make jellyroll type pincushions. All one color or use a different rib for each circle.

  19. #44
    a regular here BarbZ's Avatar
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    Another ?? What if I just want it for applique or say make a pocketbook with wool fabric and I buy some yardage or find a deal at a thrift shop like this thread is about can I just wash it in my front loader for that. I don't care about felting. Again Thanks in advance.

  20. #45
    Senior Member emlee51's Avatar
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    Wow! Sure learned a lot today about felting! This QB is the greatest! Thanks!

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johanna Fritz
    I have several hundred pounds of wool that have felted. Look for men's long wool trench coats if you can. I got a man's 6x (yes 6) once for $2.50. Cut out the satin or silk liner. Save if you want. Great for crazy quilts. Cut or pull out any fused stabilizer. Wash in the hottest water possible. Dry in really hot too. NO fabric softener. Will just dull your rotary blades. Try to get 100% wool. Any other fibers and it may not felt...then, have fun.
    Ohhh, now I don't feel so guilty for the 4 tubs of wool that
    I have waiting for projects !

  22. #47
    Senior Member auniqueview's Avatar
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    Just a thought here...if you have a front loader, I think this might be the one time to go to the laundromat...one with top loaders. Ask around and see where one is that has good hot water. Their driers are usually way too hot, too, and would be perfect for shrinking the wet wool.

    Our washer decided a year ago that it didn't want to work. We fiddled with it, and switched the water hoses around, and when I switched hot for cold, it started working. Hey...I never wash anything in hot, so who cared....my washer worked, and I didn't have to buy a new one. So nothing would be getting washed in hot here.

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