Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 53

Thread: What is just ONE thing you wish different or had known beforehand?

  1. #1
    Senior Member virgwid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Roanoke Texas
    Posts
    411

    What is just ONE thing you wish different or had known beforehand?

    Well, haven't posted in months. Lots of changes in my life and I am now settling down and able to start quilting again. I now have a new job that some time this year I will get to do from home!!! I kicked my live at college son out of his no longer used man cave (still has his bedroom), and bought a desk and chair for the job, and then realized it would only take up a small corner of the room, so my quilting is going to go from a cramped, nearly unusable section of my bedroom with my stash and such scattered all over the house to nearly a complete room!!! I have a wall picked out for a big board to hang to cover with felt (better idea?), a long table to sew and cut, 2 really ugly old bookcases that will hold books and supplies, and unfortunately only plastic storage bins to hold the fabric in. I would love your advice on the one thing you wished you had done, had known, before you set up your room, or the best piece of advice for storing everything. Right now I have all the little small what nots in a bucket that I have to dig thru, and no way to store my thread. I am slowly going thru all the pictures of the great spaces everyone has shared and am getting lots of inspiration. Trouble is, I have to do this rather fast, as I want the room to sort of look neat when the IT guys from work come to install everything, and gardening season will be starting in another couple months so my time will be even more limited. I would love all ideas, especially if there is something that is really a life and time saver or that can be done/made from other items, or any advice on how to keep organized. Thanks so much to all! Virg

  2. #2
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Riverside Washington
    Posts
    1,513
    Pegboard!! Best ever! Most everything we use can hang, with it up on the wall it is easy to see and easy to put away, with the right pegs you can even use it for a thread rack. I had DH use it on the top half of cabinet doors. emptied two drawers, and all my rulers have a new home. Used it over counter -under shelves- where ever you think it will work best for you. Have see where some have even painted designs on them. Mine is just white, have so much on it you wouldn't be able to see the design. LOL Oh Yah! those 3M hooks that come off without leaving holes work great on the ends of bookcases, walls, etc. Again I use them to hang extra long things, like extension cords, straight edges, and the like. Take your time setting up your room, you may want to sew in there for a while before you decide where you want things. You are in for a fun time!

  3. #3
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,361
    I agree I love my pegboard!!! Holds so many things!!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member MisDixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Hay River NWT Canada
    Posts
    706
    Peg board indeed!! I got the hooks and still havn't gotten the board to put them into. Now there is no room in the room to put a board, sigh. Will be trying to squeese it in this spring.

  5. #5
    Junior Member qltgrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Elkhart IN
    Posts
    224
    Re: Pegboard, if wall space is limited...I bought 1 sheet of pre finished pegboard, had the guys at home store cut it into 3 long pieces, used electrical ties to make a triangle tower...and put it on a base with casters. Now I have a full pegboard of space in 1 foot of floor room. If I move again, I am thinking of finding an old tv swivel base to mount it to with L brackets.

  6. #6
    Super Member Country1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Bowling Green, KY
    Posts
    2,476
    Pegboard!!!!!!!!!!!!! I also like to store things in the plastic bins on my shelves in order to keep dust off and to organize things better. I only buy clear ones so I can see in them. I still label them for quick reference.
    Country 1

  7. #7
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,800
    I have a wall picked out for a big board to hang to cover with felt (better idea?),
    .......... I used black fleece! Much less costly and has been working great for over two years. I've hung full size quilts on there and they've stayed put for long stretches

    While I like the convenience of pegboard, I guess I am the only one who HATES the stuff! I loathe how the pegs come out and then you are scrambling to find it along with anything else that has fallen with it!

    You wrote ... I have a wall picked out for a big board to hang to cover with felt (better idea?),
    .......... I used black fleece! Much less costly and has been working great for over two years. I've hung full size quilts on there and they've stayed put for long stretches

    My best suggestion would be to take your time and not rush!
    That usually makes for decisions that you regret later.
    Better to have your room as a WIP than to make choices and later say, it's all wrong!

    For thread storage ... I have drawers with each drawer dedicated to a different size/type. Mine are cotton 50 wt, polyester 50 wt, less than 50 wt, greater than 50 wt, embroidery floss, etc. along with a separate drawer for new spools plus a drawer with all the different types of hand and machine needles.

    You said ... Right now I have all the little small what nots in a bucket that I have to dig thru,
    I'm not sure what you have categorized in there ... hard to know what suggestions to give. Many might be things that could go into more drawers.

    For most of these, consider shallow rather than too deep of drawers. And too, watch they are not so shallow that your thread won't fit! And remember, you might be buying the large spools, so need the space for them. I like my threads laying on their sides, so that I can see them when I open the drawers, plus I store the bobbin right with it, either with a bobbin buddy on top or the two in a small plastic ziploc.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    984
    I kicked my live at home son out of his bedroom and moved him into the basement. Creating my sewing room has been a joy. I have not spent much money, I sew on a table that my mom bought used when she was first married back in the fourties. I have a table that i bought from walmart, DH cut a peice of plywood that fits the top, I covered this with batting and silver ironing board fabric purchased at Joanns. I have this set up in a configuration so I don't have to get out of my chair to iron. I keep most of my fabric in an old chest of drawers, keep the fleece in the closet. I did but two of those plastic drawers for incidentals, Its my sanctuary.

  9. #9
    Senior Member MarieM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Livingston, MT
    Posts
    431
    Blog Entries
    1
    The largest sewing/cutting table that you can fit, lots of good light and a chair that is comfortable and helps you maintain good posture. I don't have peg board, but I do have a small decorative curtain rod that hangs behind my machine with cafe rings on it so I can clip up instructions I'm working on or pictures of things that inspire me.
    Marie M.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Homosassa, FL
    Posts
    2,259
    As we raid dogs and have too too many in the house and live on sugar sand, I have all thread stored in plastic containers with tops, last two I got at connecting threads on sale for $9.99 and 2 sides, all material in containers from Wal mart with snap lids, that way stuff stays cleaner when dust gets going. http://www.connectingthreads.com/too...___D82068.html
    Wish I had more room to get mor organized but this works for now, along with a set of poly shelves from Wal Mart to hold some stuff, thread someplace else. Kind of like you, scatter here and there.
    Enjoy your new space and good for you.

  11. #11
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    I wish I had put doors on all of my fabric storage units and had more shelves , so when I pull out a piece I am not disrupting such a high stack.

  12. #12
    Senior Member kyquiltlover1942's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    418
    I agree with everyone else. I could not live without my pegboard. Actually I wish it was a little bigger. I have felt for my design wall, but I think flannel works better.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Scraplady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Birmingham, Sweet Home Alabama
    Posts
    442
    Okay, this is a lot more than ONE thing, but I'm planning a new sewing room, which I hope to move into this spring, so I have a list!

    I gotta have shelving for my stash that is spaced closer together, even if we have to build it. The shelves I use now are spaced far enough apart for the file crates that hold my fabric, but the full crates are getting too heavy for me to lift. And the piece I want that is ALWAYS at the bottom of the bin. So my new system will have shelves only about 8" apart and the fabric is coming out of the crates.

    Pegboard, pegboard, pegboard, can't live without it.

    My new space will definitely have a design wall, but you already have that in the works. I agree with kyquiltlover above, I like cotton flannel better than felt or fleece. Cotton fabric seems to stick to it better.

    I will have a pressing station that stays in place at all times.

    If you have the room, a large cutting table that you can access from at least 3 sides is wonderful. (Your pressing station could even be at one end of this table.) My cutting table is made from two cheap microwave carts from Kmart with a huge old desktop mounted across the tops. The carts are both on wheels so the whole thing rolls anywhere I need to put it. We spaced the carts back to back and far enough apart to mount a set of Closetmaid style wire drawers between them. These are great because I can access the drawers from both sides of the table. I mounted peg board on the sides of both the carts. The desk top measures 36 X 60" --big enough to baste large quilts.

    One last thing, a deep cup-holder that clamps to the table so I can't knock my coffee off in the floor anymore, or all over my project! Enjoy your new workspace!
    www.makeminepatchwork.etsy.com
    www.zibbet.com/makeminepatchwork
    "Piecin' a quilt's like livin' a life...The Lord sends us the pieces, but we can cut 'em out and put 'em together pretty much to suit ourselves, and there's a heap more in the cuttin' and the sewin' than there is in the caliker...I've had a heap of comfort all my life making quilts, and now in my old age I wouldn't take a fortune for them." (Eliza Calvert Hall, Aunt Jane of Kentucky)

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Rockwall, Texas
    Posts
    64
    I have one of those towers of multi-colored drawers. It's in storage right now (I miss it!) but I think it has 6 or 7 drawers, none deeper than 3 inches or so. You can get them at JoAnn's or even Lowes/Home Depot. This thing is so handy, each drawer has a specific function, cutting items, pins & needles etc in the next one, Marking tools including small rulers etc. all the way down to the bottom drawer that holds my basting spray and tools for making my quilt sandwich. It's a keeper! The only issue is I have to turn and open a drawer, rather than just reaching up to a peg board.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    864
    I gave a huge amount of thought to what I needed my sewing room to do when I was setting it up years ago, and from that, how it should function. I knew I would be watching, or at least listening to, television while sewing, so the first decision was where the audio/visual equipment, cords, etc., would go. I recessed them into the wall, taking space from the adjoining workshop.

    I then had my husband build 24 inch wide plywood shelves, big enough for laundry baskets full of fabric, along one wall, the back wall, and put slide-in-the tracks doors on them. This protects the fabric inside from light and dust. Next to them, a column of built in drawers with space on the bottom for a laundry basket of fabric and space on top for bolts. The drawers hold notions and supplies which I don't need frequently. Next to that, a set of metal shelves replaces what used to be a solid cabinet, but which was too hard to move to get to the electrical box. Now anyone can just reach in and flip a breaker. When you think of your room, think of expansion of fabric, supplies, machines, etc. Look five or ten years down the road.

    Along the perpendicular wall, he built a surround for the utility meters (this room is in the basement) with pegs for clothing thread storage to be kept away from light and dust. There is also an enclosed cabinet holding clothing fabric and threads. Plus that, there is a double set of bookshelves. The bookshelves have a dowel and holder at the top and I put small finished quilts on it for display. One thing I would change is to have space under the bookshelves big enough to hold any sewing machine to be stored. On top of the bookshelves, there is room for batting, machines, a window, and more. Next to the bookshelves are pantry cabinets mounted on the wall and under them are wire storage shelves on which thread lives in closed containers. I caution you not to get the Snap containers; I did and I'm sorry as they are much too flimsy. What I wish I had bought, and plan to, is these containers from Joann's.
    http://www.joann.com/iris-medium-sta...ers/xprd78990/

    Continuing around the room, the far wall is both a hallway for getting to the woodshop and a design wall made of rigid insulaltion and standing upright in front of the stairs. That insulation also keeps the room warmer.

    The fourth wall is doors to the woodshop, a cedar closet, audio/video equipment, and three way mirrors, plus the door to the bathroom.

    All of this was built from the concrete up. Also important to note is that I designed all my sewing furniture ON WHEELS because I knew the room, at 9 x 15 reet, was too small and I would have to change the configuration of the furniture and equipment for different types of sewing.

    Another thing to take into account is the electricity in that room. You need adequate outlets on enough circuits. I have four circuits in my room, one for just lights, and one is a dedicated 20 amp circuit for a large steam generator, a regular iron, or a heater. I access it on only one place, by design. It has one outlet with two plugs. Lighting is so important that this is where I put my money during construction.

    Flooring is important. Mine is light colored heavy-duty industrial linoleum squares which have performed magnificently day in and day out. Get the best floor you can from the start, and make sure you can roll your chair around on it - no carpet.

    I would say the most important thing you can do is plan. After that, I'd say paint those ugly bookcases and pick a color to paint the room (mine is cream, which is great because it is a neutral backdrop for any quilts). Good lighting is essential. I've tried most of the lighting out there for my sewing room and what works best is fluorescent lights with Ott bulbs. Ott Bults are full spectrum lighting. I also have Ott lights over several key machines and work areas. I do have a couple incandescent fixtures, which I do use, and have halogen track lights, which aren't as useful. Get good overhead full spectrum lighting every few feet if you want to match colors and see well. One needs more light for sewing than almost any other activity, including reading. The right lighting is essential.

    By the way, my walls are drywall and they work just fine. The ceiling is ceiling tiles on a grid, necessary to get to wiring.

    If I ever move, I want a much bigger room with a fireplace and windows with views and want industrial hang-down-from-the-ceiling electrical connections. Google Caryl Bryant Fallon's studio and see what mean. I also want a separate room, lined with shelves, for fabric storage. It would have a work/cutting table in the middle under OTT lighting. My fabric collection has grown a great deal and my space hasn't!

    I think you need finished plywood shelves along at least one wall to hold your plastic storage bins, which then become drawers and more useful.

    I don't recommend a big board for your design wall, and definitely not felt. The board will get in the way. However, if you put up a big dowel on curtain rod holders at the top of one wall - possibly in front of the shelves - you can hang either plain flannel, vinyl-backed flannel as in picnic tablecloths, or rigid insulation covered with flannel or cotton batting or even plain. If you wanted to, you could run cords through it so you can roll it up when not needed.

    I designed an area about 18 inches wide to the right of my main machine in my main sewing table. I put a tray from a tool kit with small baskets in it so I can grab what I need quickly. It holds awls, some needles, feet I often use, pencils, measuring tools, magnifying glass, and a whole lot more. I could take it to another machine if needed. Other needed stuff is in drawers in the main table.

    Leave a space for guests under good lighting.

    I highly recommend the book, Sewing Dream Spaces :

    http://www.amazon.com/Dream-Sewing-S...g+dream+spaces

    Think about where to put a laptop.

    It pays to put time into planning. Except for what I've mentioned, I would do the room again just like I've described. It has served me well for over 20 years and still meets my changing needs.

    Cricket
    Last edited by cricket_iscute; 01-13-2013 at 02:15 PM.

  16. #16
    Super Member TexasSunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Kilgore Tx
    Posts
    1,838
    I love my pegboard. It is a 4X8 sheet, painted and mounted on the wall above my sewing table. I keep the things I use most like scissors, rotary cutters, etc on the lower part so I can reach them easily. I have all kinds of things hanging on it like some larger rulers, blades for cutters, embrodiery hoops, tape measures,masking tape and patterns.
    Texas Sunshine, piney woods of NE Texas

  17. #17
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Barnesville GA
    Posts
    3,258
    Quote Originally Posted by qltgrose View Post
    Re: Pegboard, if wall space is limited...I bought 1 sheet of pre finished pegboard, had the guys at home store cut it into 3 long pieces, used electrical ties to make a triangle tower...and put it on a base with casters. Now I have a full pegboard of space in 1 foot of floor room. If I move again, I am thinking of finding an old tv swivel base to mount it to with L brackets.
    What a great idea..

  18. #18
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    3,399
    Blog Entries
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by qltgrose View Post
    Re: Pegboard, if wall space is limited...I bought 1 sheet of pre finished pegboard, had the guys at home store cut it into 3 long pieces, used electrical ties to make a triangle tower...and put it on a base with casters. Now I have a full pegboard of space in 1 foot of floor room. If I move again, I am thinking of finding an old tv swivel base to mount it to with L brackets.
    That is a brilliant idea. I have a space in my room where that would fit perfectly. Thank you for sharing.

  19. #19
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    3,399
    Blog Entries
    15
    Lighting, lighting,lighting. I let my electrician talk me into less but am now regretting it. Thank goodness for lamps and strip lighting. Get one eye fixed tomorrow so will be able to drive by Saturday. I'm going shopping.

  20. #20
    Super Member MaryKatherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Guelph, On. -
    Posts
    1,673
    Blog Entries
    1
    Though there are windows at ceiling height, I wish I wasn't in the basement.
    MaryKatherine
    marykayhopkins123.blogspot.com

  21. #21
    Super Member MaryAnnMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    in front of this dang computer instead of my Bernina!(Naples, Florida)
    Posts
    1,661
    I agree with QuiltE, felt didn't work for me. I used black batting, but the fleece would be less expensive. My board is made of foam insulation. My DH nailed a strip of molding along the wall, and my board rests on it with Command strips holding it to the wall, which means no big screw holes in the wallboard.

    For all my little bits n bobs, I bought an office-supply drawer insert with various sizes of cubbies. Rather than staplers, rulers, and erasers, mine holds boxes of pins, thimbles, seam rippers, marking pens, etc. You could probably empty your bucket into one and actually find things.

    I think my only real suggestion si, don't do anything permanent until you have lived in and sewed in there for a while. I ended up rearranging a picture-perfect space because it didn't function the way I had hoped. Enjoy your new space!!
    aka Chicken McLittle

    If it's true we learn from our mistakes, I'm going to be a genius!

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    League City, Texas
    Posts
    506
    One of the best and most helpful things I did in my sewing room was to hang two peg boards for thread. Now all my thread is organized in one place and not scattered all over.
    Texas raised, Texas Proud

  23. #23
    Super Member DebbE's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,615
    Pegboard, absolutely. Look for old kitchen cabinets for free or almost nothing on craigslist...those can be painted and installed along one wall in your room, and with an inexpensive countertop from Lowes or Home Depot, you've got immediate storage space that looks nice. Nickel cabinet pulls can be purchased 10 to a package very inexpensively, too. I took 2 sets of wall cabinets and hung one at each end of the cabinets and then hubby built open shelving in between the 2 sets. That's where I put clear plastic shoe boxes of misc odds and ends (zippers, threads in rainbow colors, trims, etc). Underneath the wall cabinets/shelves, hubby built a long skinny open shelf the same length, and that's used for misc, and he installed my Ikea mini floods under the cabinets, so I now have tons of light on my countertop. Perfect height for cutting, etc. Ikea has the perfect open bookshelves for fabrics - Billy - and hubby installed doors on each end set -- in the middle is a skinny version of the Billy bookshelf for all the books. Due to weight of books, its good to do a skinny bookshelf there! Magazines are in Ikea metal magazine holders all along the bottom shelves of the bookshelves. These cover one whole wall, and believe me, I use every inch, including the top. The top has metal baskets that hold my Christmas, foreign (from Nepal, etc), upholstery fabrics, etc. My pegboard is behind the door as I have almost no wall space. The design wall is 3 - 88 cent nickel robe "U" hooks from Lowes. Hubby took 2 - 1x2 primed 8 foot white boards (Lowes, about $2.50 each) to insert into pockets I made from flannel. I sewed 2 long strips of off white flannel together, except for the top 5", which I didn't sew together. Made pockets at the top & bottom to slide the boards through. The reason I didn't sew the top 5" is when you hang the top board up on the robe hooks, the fabric lays on each side of the hook, and its drapes beautifully. Easily taken down and transported, if necessary. Love, love my display wall! I also have a comfy chair to sit to sew in, and an old antique crank table that my machines are on. There is a lot in my quilt room, but most is hidden away with all this storage, and the bookshelves show off all the beautiful fabrics folded into colors, 30's, Australian fabrics, children/baby fabrics, etc. Hope this helps you -- take your time, you can do it very inexpensively with a little creativity, and really maximize your space, too.

  24. #24
    Senior Member MarthaT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Alabama
    Posts
    712
    For me it's keeping whatever I have organized and in places where I know what I have, so I will use it. No matter how much space you have, it's easy to overflow that space and then store things you never use because you forget you have it. I find I need to keep my fabric collection small enough that I know what I have. Organized in a way I can see what I have. Stashing in boxes, etc. doesn't work. Out of sight, out of mind! I am purposely limiting my sewing area because I tend to be a pack rat if I have more space.
    Thimble and Thread

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    the beach
    Posts
    547
    After years of trying to figure out where I stored my machine needles, why my basting safety pins were hiding from me and wondering where to put my "handmade by ...." labels, I finally bought some very small stacking boxes. They're only about six inches square and about 1-1/2 inch high, but they stack and can be labeled, so all my tiny whatsits have a home. I find that it's easy to eventually solve the storage needs of bigger things, but the tiny things (applique pins, where are you?) need to be corraled near to hand. I can't help by giving you a source because I found mine at a thrift shop.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.