Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Another Instapot question

  1. #1
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    1,967

    Another Instapot question

    While following a link for soup in another thread, I came across a recipe for cranberry sauce in the Instapot. You have to bring it to pressure twice because of the sugar addition. What's the advantage of that way over a covered saucepan on the stove? Cranberries don't take that long to cook. Love mine for meats, but haven't expanded my repertoire much yet. I was canning pork in it, but have discovered that is a no-no. Obviously, I didn't die, but I won't be doing any more.

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,931
    ...some food is best done the old fashioned way-in a pot, on a stove.......I guess the difference being in the electric pressure cooker one does not have to "watch" - "stir"....

  3. #3
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    1,967
    I think it's a fad and if you belong to a FB group, a bit of competition. I'm not sure about not watching it. I think the slow cooker wins there, though I'm not a big slow cooker fan.

  4. #4
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,543
    For me the advantage of the Instant Pot is that I can get a meal in it and then go away and come back later to cooked delicious (to us) food. I don't have to do too much planning ahead as in crockpot. I usually stop at the store on my way home a couple times a week and think "what should I cook in the Instant Pot tonight". I keep beans and seasoning meat on hand too. But of course it isn't for everyone and if you like stovetop/crocktop better that is what you should do.
    Alyce

  5. #5
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    1,967
    Oh, I like beans cooked for 20 minutes with no smell in the house. I like Jewish Pot Roast cooked in 25 minutes with a good broth for gravy, etc. I just am not interested in doing things like cheesecake and cake mixes. I haven't worked much with vegetables, yet, but I can see where it would be a plus. My daughter says whole sweet potatoes were very good. I do plan on using mine more.

  6. #6
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    7,190
    Blog Entries
    1
    I make cranberry sauce in a saucepan on top of the stove. It only takes long enough for the sugar, water, and berries to boil...is the InstaPot sauce something else? It just doesn’t take long to do it the “old” way.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Flagstaff, Arizona
    Posts
    6,201
    I got an instapot for Christmas and it will stay in the box forever. I am old fashioned and definitely will NOT use it. I think it is a fad just like Irishrose 2 said.

  8. #8
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    N. Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    783
    It's not really a fad and not a competition....this is the electric version of your grandmother's pressure cooker only you don't have to stand guard while it's cooking. I manage to put mine away for a couple of days in the week and then boom! out it comes again...Today, I made turkey stock and after adding all the ingredients, I pushed a button and didn't bother with it again for several hours. The broth was excellent and instead of bland meat, what was still on the bone was delicious. This pot is a lifesaver if you work and come home to hungry husband and kids. As for cramberry sauce, I cannot imagine why one wouldn't just use a saucepan.
    One Facebook Instapot group has over 500 Thousand members! that's not a fad.
    Last edited by leighway; 01-31-2018 at 05:13 PM. Reason: additional information

  9. #9
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,543
    Quote Originally Posted by leighway View Post
    It's not really a fad and not a competition....this is the electric version of your grandmother's pressure cooker only you don't have to stand guard while it's cooking. I manage to put mine away for a couple of days in the week and then boom! out it comes again...Today, I made turkey stock and after adding all the ingredients, I pushed a button and didn't bother with it again for several hours. The broth was excellent and instead of bland meat, what was still on the bone was delicious. This pot is a lifesaver if you work and come home to hungry husband and kids. As for cramberry sauce, I cannot imagine why one wouldn't just use a saucepan.
    One Facebook Instapot group has over 500 Thousand members! that's not a fad.
    well leighway - you said it better than I could. I have 3 Instant pots. I use them all. Sometimes two on the same day. I've had two,of them over a year. I had a presto stove top a while back. Too heavy to deal with and had an electric stove. Gave it to a friend who uses it once a year. I guess an electric sewing machine was considered a fad by some way back.
    Alyce

  10. #10
    Super Member Oksewnsew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Edmond, OK
    Posts
    1,847
    I love, love, love my Instant Pot. My son got it for me 'just because'. I (we) use it a lot. I've made cheesecakes, Creme Brulee`, baked chicken w/taters, meatloaf, pork tenderloin, brisket, bbq ribs, & chicken, roasts w/taters & the Salted potatoes. I love the fact you can decide late in the day what you'd like and within 30 mins, dinner is on the table. We fixed a 4# brisket Sunday and from start to finish it was done with a rub, and cooked in 60 mins. It was sooo good. It's so much more convenient than doing the slow cooker, to me anyway..

  11. #11
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    1,967
    I don't think the Instapot is a fad, just the overuse like making cranberry sauce in it. Quick, tender meat can't be beat. I bought some veggies yesterday to try. I'll let you know if I like them better than oven or stovetop.

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    NY Adirondacks in Summer and goes "South" to WNY in the winter!
    Posts
    288
    I cooked corned beef recently. I like the flavor of meat, etc cooked in the instant pot, but I am not sure how fast it is. Mine takes at least 10 mins. to get to pressure, cooks, then 10 mins to cool down, add veggies, 10 mins back to pressure, cook, release time again and so a lot longer than recipe indicates. Am I doing something wrong? Then when I tried to release pressure manually, I had fatty steam all over my counter!

  13. #13
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,543
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry in the ADK View Post
    I cooked corned beef recently. I like the flavor of meat, etc cooked in the instant pot, but I am not sure how fast it is. Mine takes at least 10 mins. to get to pressure, cooks, then 10 mins to cool down, add veggies, 10 mins back to pressure, cook, release time again and so a lot longer than recipe indicates. Am I doing something wrong? Then when I tried to release pressure manually, I had fatty steam all over my counter!
    that sounds fast to me! It really isn't "Instant" but your times sound about right. How long would it have cooked on the stove? I cooked a roast tonight for 100 minutes. I let it release totally. When I am in a situation like yours I do a controlled release. Just open the valve a bit at a time and you won't have the spray.
    Alyce

  14. #14
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    1,967
    My understanding is that meat should be allowed to do a natural release. When I've done that, it was much more tender.

  15. #15
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,543
    Quote Originally Posted by Irishrose2 View Post
    My understanding is that meat should be allowed to do a natural release. When I've done that, it was much more tender.
    . That is generally true except if you want to open it to put in some
    vegetwbles then you would do a controlled release and then reset and at the end natural release
    Alyce

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    684
    Took me a bit to fully appreciate my slow cooker, microwave, convection oven and now instant pot. But now I wouldn't cook without any of them! As for a fad, I would nominate the bread baker. Remember those from years ago? Now you can't give them away at yard sales. Another fad from the 70's is back again....fondue pots. Wonder what's next?

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Beautiful BC
    Posts
    1,763
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by LenaBeena View Post
    Took me a bit to fully appreciate my slow cooker, microwave, convection oven and now instant pot. But now I wouldn't cook without any of them! As for a fad, I would nominate the bread baker. Remember those from years ago? Now you can't give them away at yard sales. Another fad from the 70's is back again....fondue pots. Wonder what's next?
    I have never had a bread maker, but I do have and use fondue pots. We have fondue, cheese, beef broth and chocolate every Christmas Eve and a couple other times a year. I have 3 fondue pots. They also work great to keep gravy hot if you are having a buffet. Or beef dip broth.

    I was regifted an instant pot, Mum was given one for Christmas, used it once and passed it along to me. I used it once to make a recipe from a Taste of Home Magazine. Yuck, it was awful, so much that I wrote to the magazine and complained that they could not possibly have tested the recipe. It was supposed to be for an apple dessert. We cooked as instructed and it was mostly raw. I had to cook it for another 40 minutes in the oven, but it still tasted nasty. Way too much sugar.

    I may use it again, but for now it is back in the box.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  18. #18
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,543
    I wouldn’t blame the Instant Pot for a bad recipe! I’ve been using mine over a year and haven’t had anything bad. Some things we like better than others but everything has been good. I look for tried and true Instant Pot recipes and have gotten a feel for it and what we like and cooking times. It is really pretty easy to get a good meal out of it.
    Alyce

  19. #19
    Super Member moonrise's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northwest Georgia
    Posts
    3,365
    I love mine so much that I bought a second one (the 3 quart mini) for our camper. For me, it's worth it just for the simplicity and speed of cooking dry pinto beans, hard-boiled eggs, mashed potatoes, and roasts. Just plop the food in, set the number of minutes, and walk away. I use the slow cooker function often, too. The other features are "gravy". For example, I've never used the yogurt function, but it's there if I decide to try it sometime (and I probably will).

    I definitely don't consider it to be a fad. In fact, if it ever breaks, I'll have another one ordered that same day.

    Some people mention that they're intimidated by it. I was, a little, at first, but after doing the "water test" and seeing what to expect, I quickly became comfortable with it. My grandmother's pressure cooker was the stove-top kind, and it was so terrifying to a little kid. I avoided her kitchen whenever she had it going, because there was no doubt in my mind that it was going to explode! It never did, but boy was it scary! ha ha

  20. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    268
    Love my instant pot!

    Just cooked corn beef and cabbage. Great and no ordor. 2.5 lb brined beef, rinse, place on trivet in pot add 3 cups water and sprinkle spices on top, seal and set timer for 90 min on high pressure. Quick release and add quarted cabbage. Seal and Cook for another 3 min, quick release.

  21. #21
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,661
    Gave our daughter an IP and she embraced it. She learned on YouTube how to use it because the instruction book is confusing. Her husband called me & said she was a good cook before, but this even took it up a few notches. She’s having so much fun I got one myself. Good eating !

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,545
    I finally ordered one for myself, after DH took 8 hours to cook up beans. I've never cooked anything in a pressure cooker, so that will be new for me. I bought the mini as it's just DH and I, and we are trying hard not to have leftovers as often. That is part of a "eat less" overall plan.

    I do own 4 pressure canners though, and have done a lot of canning with them so that part is not new. My smallest one is 10 quarts, and this is considered the smallest size you can safely can in. It's due to the length of time to heat up and cool down. Smaller pressure cookers do that faster so you don't have the assurance that your food as reached the required temperature for the specified length of time needed to kill the botulism spoors that may be present. If the spoors were not there to start with, eating improperly pressure canned food won't hurt you. However the toxins they produce are odorless and tasteless, but can be deadly.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.