Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Tons of Artichokes...what to make?

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Mendocino Coast, CA
    Posts
    1,702

    Tons of Artichokes...what to make?

    I know...I'm so blessed to have these artichokes. When I lived down south, I would baby my artichoke plants, hoping and praying that I would get 2, maybe 3 artichokes from them. Sadly, if I wasn't careful, the plants would die in the summer heat. Now that I live in Northern California, my artichoke plants are abundantly full of artichokes. As for the plants, I couldn't kill them if I tried. They grow like crazy! I just harvested about a dozen medium sized artichokes and have at least a couple dozen more on the plants that will be ready soon. Anyone have some good, healthy recipes for artichokes? Thanks.

    ~ C

  2. #2
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    SW Washington USA
    Posts
    3,247
    believe it or not I've never eaten one, but they were in abundance in the produce department at Safeway yesterday

  3. #3
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Fairfield, OH
    Posts
    3,670
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have no idea how to fix them. I cook all kinds of things but have never fixed one. I would be curious to see what people come up with. Spinach artichoke dip is the only thing I know of.

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,676
    Google them ? I boiled some from a Farmers Market on top of stove but outer leaves didn’t soften so it didn’t leave much for consumption. Maybe steaming would be better ?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    426
    Oh you can send them to me, ha ha! I Love those things and they are so expensive to buy in the store Wish I lived close to you, I have only cooked them on the stove top and then eaten the tips of the leaves and the heart. A lot of work to get so little but ohhhh soooooo good. I usually boil mine longer so I can get more off the leaves with my teeth, but have no idea of any other way to fix them, if I want them for a dip I buy the canned hearts occasionally. They supposedly have a seed out for the Midwest that grows some thru the summer, so am going to try some of those as an experiment, Happy eating to you, wish I could be there to help you eat, I would be in what my mom used to say "hog heaven"
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-04-2019 at 09:05 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  6. #6
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mableton, GA
    Posts
    9,547
    Do you have an Instant Pot? I keep seeing recipes for artichokes in my blogs.
    What about google? Probably a lot of choices on how to cook them
    Alyce

  7. #7
    Super Member lawsonmugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    missouri
    Posts
    7,971
    I'm originally from San Francisco so I was raised with lots of fresh veggies and fruits. I miss the fresh artichokes and asparagus. I lived in San Jose for several years and bought a paper grocery bag of avacados for a $1. Similar prices on the others. I'm in missouri now and nothing like that here. I just cut off the stem and boiled them about 1 hour till a fork slides into the stem end easily. They are very good dipped in mayo. Enjoy yours also make artichoke dip. I pay $2.30 for just 1 here. Themachinelady can you Please tell me where you are getting the seeds?
    Mary

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Keller, TX
    Posts
    1,377
    Artichoke dip is wonderful....mix some spinach with it, very tasty. Sams carries it already prepared. Like to make my own.

  9. #9
    Super Member osewme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,412
    I've never eaten one but this recipe sounds really good & got rave reviews:
    https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/amazin...okes/#comments

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Chula Vista CA
    Posts
    6,588
    If I had that many I would try canning them. It sounds like a lot of work but being able to have them later would be worth it to me. I love the artichokes in salad and on pizza. (Also, just open a jar and snack is good too.) But I am not sure if they would last that long in my house. My family loves cooked artichokes. I usually cook them in the pressure cooker when cooking more than one. I have a very small 5 cup rice cooker that I use when there is just one. (I can set it for an hour and it stops when done.)

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,368
    I make Italian stuffed artichokes for holidays. They are stuffed with Italian seasoned bread crumbs and grated Romano or Parmesan cheese, fresh chopped parsley and garlic powder. First you have to soak them in a sink of water to make sure to get any live or dead bugs out if there are any in between the leaves. Drain the artichokes upside down in a dish drainer. Cut off the sharp tips on each individual leaf with a sharp knife. In the center where all the leaves come together in a long point, cut those tips off all as one. Cut the stems off so the artichokes can sit upright and level. Spread all the leaves apart and sprinkle the seasoned bread crumbs into them so there's a layer of breading in the bottom half of each leaf. Sit all the artichokes in a shallow pan like a lasagna pan, drizzle a tiny bit of water over each and also a little drizzle of olive oil on each. Sprinkle more grated cheese on the tops of each stuffed artichoke. Put about a half inch of water in the bottom of the pan, cover tightly with aluminum foil, and bake at 350 degrees for about three hours. You may want to check once halfway through to make sure there's still some water in the bottom of the pan---add more if needed. Usually mine don't cook dry. Once baked, sit the pan aside to cool. These can be made the night before the holiday dinner, as they are eaten at room temperature and don't require refrigeration. To eat them, pull off the leaves one at a time starting with the outermost leaves, and draw the leaf through your teeth pulling the bread crumb stuffing and soft bottoms of the leaves off with your top teeth. It's the flavored breading and soft leaf bottoms that are consumed, not the fibrous parts of the leaves. Stuffed artichokes have a mild flavor, much like other foods like shrimp.
    Now you can be a little "Italian" at your next holiday dinner. Enjoy my family recipe!

  12. #12
    Super Member tesspug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,958
    Not recipe, but a pretty wreath. I bought small artichoke once by the ocean. I threaded a string through the stem and hung them upside down in the garage. When they were complete dry I spray painted them gold and attached them to a grapevine wreath. I added fall leaves and pinecones for a fall wreath, then at Christmas I took off the leaves and added gold balls.
    I promise not to buy any more fabric until I see something I really like. Or it's on sale. Or I think it might match something.

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Mendocino Coast, CA
    Posts
    1,702
    I had to use up about 15 artichokes so I steamed them in a big pot with a couple of quartered lemons, let them cool and then removed all of the leaves and "choke" part until I just had the hearts left. I mashed them up in the food processor with a some ground almonds, (left over from making almond milk,) a little cashew yogurt and some spices. It made a nice dip that I spread on some french bread rounds and served them for appetizers. Pretty good! The almond and artichoke flavors complimented each other.

    I think I'll go for an Italian, artichoke casserole next time, or try one of the recipes offered above...thanks!

    ~ C

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    1,185
    I too have never eaten one; have No idea what they taste like.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-05-2019 at 07:01 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    6,320
    I love artichoke dip, but can't find my recipe. Good luck hunting one that you like.

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Mendocino Coast, CA
    Posts
    1,702
    I'm so sad for those of you that have never tasted an artichoke. They are divine! They taste somewhat like asparagus and are lots of fun to eat. The typical way to cook them is to boil them in salted water and serve one to each person. Then, everyone tears the leaves off, dips them in some sort of dip (melted butter, mayo, ranch, etc.) and scrapes the dip and plant flesh off of the leaf between their teeth. The used leaves are tossed in a big, communal bowl. It's a fun family dish!

    Another way to eat them is to steam, or boil them and then take all of the leaves off, throw them away and just use the base, or "heart" of the artichoke in various dishes. I'm thinking of using this method to make artichoke ravioli next time.

    ~ C

  17. #17
    Super Member GingerK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,556
    Oh Tropit I wish I was in your shoes! I love artichokes but really only get to enjoy the canned ones and therefore have only had the hearts and never the leaves. We use them on pizza, dip, antipasto trays, and (shhh don't tell my DH) right out of the can!!
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down the their level and beat you with experience.

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Hampstead N.C.
    Posts
    1,641
    Blog Entries
    1
    I too love artichokes any way they are cooked. My favorite it stuffing them as Just a Bit Crazy spoke of, but steamed with a little lemon water is good, dip is good. I guess being you have so many you can try making a tray of slightly steamed and then stuffing and freezing for later use. Usually, I don't steam first when baking stuffed artichokes but I never have so many that freezing would be required.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-07-2019 at 03:40 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  19. #19
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    The Finger Lakes of upstate NY
    Posts
    2,682
    Prep = Spread leaves gently to wash, cut spikey tips off with kitchen scissors (or knife, I think scissors are easier). Boil or steam to serve with clarified butter seasoned as desired (plain, herb, lemon).

    Or prep as above, then cut in quarters, remove choke. Saute in ghee or olive oil. Or roast. Serve as a side or use in recipe in place of canned/frozen. A favorite is https://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-chi...ne-sauce-98743.

  20. #20
    Super Member Celeste's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    N. Ca
    Posts
    4,516
    Blog Entries
    32
    I gotta jump in real quick and share what I think is a funny story. When I was in grade school I tasted an artichoke for the first time and really liked it. My Mom bought some so I could make some myself. They had used mayonnaise to dip the tips in, so thatís what I did for her. Picture her standing on one side if the kitchen, taking a bite then, hanging her tongue out, walking rapidly to the sink and shaking her head to get rid of the the stuff. Turns out she hates mayonnaise!
    Last edited by Celeste; 05-19-2019 at 06:24 PM.
    Please post your pet's - past and present -pictures at http://www.quiltingboard.com/general...ds-t32280.html

  21. #21
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Mendocino Coast, CA
    Posts
    1,702
    Last night, I boiled up about 15 artichokes in a big pot with a little lemon and salt. When they were done, I took off all of the leaves and discarded them. I took the "hearts" and dusted them in flour and S&P, then egg/milk mixture, then tossed them into a bowl of panko, bread crumbs. From there, they went on to a lightly oiled, sheet pan and into the oven at about 400 degrees F. They baked until they were a nice golden brown. They were heavenly!

    ~ C

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.