Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: tons of little prunes

  1. #1
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    My daughter`s prune tree is fulllllllll of little prunes and thy are just about ripe( yep, even in northern ontario...lol)....does anyone know what i can do with them....maybe a recipe of jam or jelly, or maybe a website. Thy are quite small, red when ripe and a bit tart. Don`t want them to go to waste, although someone she knows collects a lot of them to make liqueur....

  2. #2
    Super Member bluteddi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    3,141
    prune wine!!!! yum

  3. #3
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,797
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.

  4. #4
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    oh maybe ...in french it is prune but english must be plums....
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.

  5. #5
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    do you do the certo thing for ur jam??
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.

  6. #6
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,797
    Quote Originally Posted by huntannette
    do you do the certo thing for ur jam??
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.
    Mais Oui!! En anglais .... Prunes are what you have after you dry up the plums a little. So sorry, I hadn't thought of the french influence! :)

    It's been years since I made it. Yes, it would have been made with certo. There's some very delicious desserts (coffee cake or flan like) that use plums.

  7. #7
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    LOL Mais oui!! lol think we`ll try some wine or liqueur...looking up recipes but like to get feedback from someone who`s made it before before i try a recipe...there are so muchplums, i do want to try jam as well
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Quote Originally Posted by huntannette
    do you do the certo thing for ur jam??
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.
    Mais Oui!! En anglais .... Prunes are what you have after you dry up the plums a little. So sorry, I hadn't thought of the french influence! :)

    It's been years since I made it. Yes, it would have been made with certo. There's some very delicious desserts (coffee cake or flan like) that use plums.

  8. #8
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    do you have a special recipe or do you use the one with vodka and brandy plus sugar???
    Quote Originally Posted by bluteddi
    prune wine!!!! yum

  9. #9
    Super Member vivoaks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Beaver PA USA
    Posts
    1,671
    Quote Originally Posted by huntannette
    oh maybe ...in french it is prune but english must be plums....
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.
    There is such a thing as a prune-plums. We had a tree at one point, and they may have been plums, but when dried, they were prunes. Same thing - just one was dried and one was fresh.

  10. #10
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,797
    Quote Originally Posted by vivoaks
    Quote Originally Posted by huntannette
    oh maybe ...in french it is prune but english must be plums....
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.
    There is such a thing as a prune-plums. We had a tree at one point, and they may have been plums, but when dried, they were prunes. Same thing - just one was dried and one was fresh.
    Yes, and as mentioned in the previous post ... prunes are dried up plums

  11. #11
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    these are the size of cherry tomatoes and red when ripe...this year is a bumper crop...there are so many, it is a shame not to do something with them

  12. #12
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    in french, both are prune
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Quote Originally Posted by vivoaks
    Quote Originally Posted by huntannette
    oh maybe ...in french it is prune but english must be plums....
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE
    Prunes?
    Me-thinks you mean plums ... I've made plum jam/jelly, canned them, and frozen.
    There is such a thing as a prune-plums. We had a tree at one point, and they may have been plums, but when dried, they were prunes. Same thing - just one was dried and one was fresh.
    Yes, and as mentioned in the previous post ... prunes are dried up plums

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    222
    You can pickle them or make a chutney, as well as the usual jams, jellies, canning etc.

  14. #14
    Senior Member patimint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Hamilton, Montana
    Posts
    968
    Last year when my neighbor gave me tons of them, I made Plum Butter. Just like making apple butter, if you know how to do that. add just a tad more sugar. Yum, it was so good

  15. #15
    Senior Member ncredbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Greeneville, TN
    Posts
    827
    I used to can them. I would fill a clean jar with clean plums and pour boiling water over them until they were within half an inch from the top of the jar. Seal and process. It has been so long I don't remember how long. The great thing is other than washing them well you don't have to do anything to them. I left the seeds in. As they sit they make their own very beautiful dark purple sweet syrup which we would pour over pancakes. I would let them sit for a couple of months prior to opening them. We do about the same thing to make concord grape juice. Ann in TN

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Hamburg,Western New York State
    Posts
    4,292
    If they are prune plums...we canned them(leaving the stones in). So easy. And they make wondeful jam.

  17. #17
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Fairfield, OH
    Posts
    3,287
    Blog Entries
    1
    Several years ago my sisters plum tree went crazy and was covered with plums. I made this bread and it was delicious. I also pureed them and froze them to use in recipes instead of oil. Used in zucchini bread , pumpkin bread and chocolate cake instead of oil. Very good ( my family actually likes it better than with oil)

    Plum Bread



    Prep Time: 20 minsTotal Time: 1 hrs 15 minsYield: 2 loaves

    Ingredients
    2 cups diced Italian plums ( Nectarines or Peaches can also be used)
    3 cups flour
    1 cup butter
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    4 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    3/4 cup vanilla yogurt
    Directions
    Cream butter sugar and vanilla together until fluffy.
    Add eggs one at a time, beat after each addition.
    Sift together flour, salt, cream of tartar, and baking soda.
    Add about 1/3 of the yogurt to the mixture then 1/3 of the flour mixture, alternating until all is added.
    fill two greased and floured bread pans 1/2 full with batter, then add 1/4 of the fruit to each pan, then the remaining batter and top with the remaining fruit.
    Bake at 350 degrees for about 50-55 minutes.
    cool in the pan for about 15 minutes and turn onto a platter.
    Makes two loaves but freezes well.
    Page 2 of 2

  18. #18
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    when you can them like that, do you eat the plums too, or just the syrup??
    Quote Originally Posted by ncredbird
    I used to can them. I would fill a clean jar with clean plums and pour boiling water over them until they were within half an inch from the top of the jar. Seal and process. It has been so long I don't remember how long. The great thing is other than washing them well you don't have to do anything to them. I left the seeds in. As they sit they make their own very beautiful dark purple sweet syrup which we would pour over pancakes. I would let them sit for a couple of months prior to opening them. We do about the same thing to make concord grape juice. Ann in TN

  19. #19
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern ontario
    Posts
    4,221
    hmmm sounds good...will try that as soon as i get my new oven
    Quote Originally Posted by meanmom
    Several years ago my sisters plum tree went crazy and was covered with plums. I made this bread and it was delicious. I also pureed them and froze them to use in recipes instead of oil. Used in zucchini bread , pumpkin bread and chocolate cake instead of oil. Very good ( my family actually likes it better than with oil)

    Plum Bread



    Prep Time: 20 minsTotal Time: 1 hrs 15 minsYield: 2 loaves

    Ingredients
    2 cups diced Italian plums ( Nectarines or Peaches can also be used)
    3 cups flour
    1 cup butter
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    4 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    3/4 cup vanilla yogurt
    Directions
    Cream butter sugar and vanilla together until fluffy.
    Add eggs one at a time, beat after each addition.
    Sift together flour, salt, cream of tartar, and baking soda.
    Add about 1/3 of the yogurt to the mixture then 1/3 of the flour mixture, alternating until all is added.
    fill two greased and floured bread pans 1/2 full with batter, then add 1/4 of the fruit to each pan, then the remaining batter and top with the remaining fruit.
    Bake at 350 degrees for about 50-55 minutes.
    cool in the pan for about 15 minutes and turn onto a platter.
    Makes two loaves but freezes well.
    Page 2 of 2

  20. #20
    Junior Member GypsyRse1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Salem Oregon
    Posts
    163
    Blog Entries
    22
    Cut those babies in 1/2, remove the seed and pop them in the dehydrator... so many uses all winter long... yum

  21. #21
    Super Member Pzazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    NW Minnesota
    Posts
    1,250
    The type of plums used commercially to make prunes, is prune plums. They are about the size of a small egg, and are very dark blue...almost purple.

    My mom always made jam with 1/2 prune plums, and 1/2 peaches. I think of her every time I make it. :)

    I also have a couple of recipes for baked goods using plums. Of course, they are at home, and I am at work. I will try to remember to look them up this evening.

    Patti

  22. #22
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    10,710
    Blog Entries
    36
    Wow interesting conversation of Le prune. Love it

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.