Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Type 1 Diabetes

  1. #1
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,122

    Type 1 Diabetes

    Does anyone have recipes that they have tried for a child who has just been diagnosed? There are many recipes available on the internet, but it would be nice to know which ones were a success, thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,282
    I don't have any recipes off the top of my head but my daughter uses Nutella between frozen waffles to get the GD her required carbs for a quick breakfast before school. GD is 9 years old and also has celiac disease (can't have products with gluten).

    mltquilt

  3. #3
    Member Dizzy Dolly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    73
    most type one ,,, main things to remeber is that carbs is a killer to us ( am diabetes} try to lower the carbs not only the sugars and read a lot on this is the number 1 helper to understand what can help and not to do ,,,,, the nutriens. nurse said not think about what u can`t have but what u can have ,,, and that has been a real big help ,,, good luck and don`t be afraid to ask this is a hard diease but we learn to deal with it and you can get thru it,,, And they can have snacks like ruffler poto*s chips ect things with no carbs not much on typing to make myself clear but remeber not what u can have but what u can have,.,

  4. #4
    Member Dizzy Dolly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    73
    can`t have sorry mistake ,,

  5. #5
    Super Member sweet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    playing with fabric in Louisiana
    Posts
    3,376
    Think protein! Peanut butter on celery sticks with raisins is "Ants on a Log". Or try the sugar free jello pudding, you can even freeze it. Good Luck!

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fort White, Fl
    Posts
    2,673
    Blog Entries
    1
    You not only have to watch the carbs along with the sugar, you need to find out what effecdts the readings. I am type 2 and while I can eat a baked potato I cannot eat rice without soaring on the moniter. Most people can eat about anything they want in moderation.
    I do know the green veggies are the best for all of us and you can stir fry with them. I do make my own soups and stews. Use a lot of chicken so that protein will be good. I do not fry a lot. Also remember that eating something 6 times a day is great for diabetics. I do not much use recipes so cannot help there.
    A friend is someone who knows all about you and loves you anyway.

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Grants Pass, OR
    Posts
    1,979
    As a school nurse, I try to convince the kids to eat nutritious mini meals if they need them, but actually, most of the kids just eat what is given at school and compensate for their carbs with their insulin. I have had children whose parents make them crazy with calling and worrying. Serve nutritious meals for your whole family, teach the child to recognize the symptoms of hyper and hypoglycemia, teach portion control, teach them to measure their own blood sugars and their own insulin. After they are proficient, just regular reminders about these things are necessary. Kids are really smart. Also, the doctor and his nurse will be great helpers with this disease. Please keep them posted on irregularities with the blood sugars. They can help lots. The poster Dizzy Dolly said it well when she said to think not about what you can't have but what you can have. Just remember to adjust your insulin when you do. This is important! ****If you have a type I diabetic child, please take all supplies that the school nurse asks for to school. Many school districts do not have monitors, or "extra" insulin, glucose tabs, or strips.**** Send your child to school with a bottle of water daily, as well as crackers, or other carb snack just in case they need it. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    The other Milwaukie, Oregon
    Posts
    1,759
    Dear Thimblebug,
    Your question is huge and I remember so well being in your shoes. My son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was three and a half years old. I was scared to death and had no idea what to feed him, do the injections or how I was going to manage this disease. There was so much to learn, to remember, to watch out for and on and on. Fortunately my sister went to the diabetes association and grabbed a suitcase full of brochures etc. and we listened very carefully to our doctors and educators. Oh how I wish you & I were neighbors! I would hold your hand and tell you that it will turn out okay. My son just turned 30! (How could I have a baby who is now 30?!!) and he is doing his medical internship at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle Washington. He and his darling little wife will leave there in June to start his residency at Stanford in July. He was a great athlete in high school and college, received excellent grades and has absolutely no signs of complications! (I am so stinkin proud of him I can't stand it!) This is an excellent website:
    http://www.diabetes.org (BTW this website also has recipes that are real and well tested) It has information about every diabetic detail. I urge you to get involved with support groups and education opportunities as often as possible. Another great group is www.jdrf.org. That is Juvenile diabetes Research Foundation because type 1 or Juvenile Diabetes is a totally different disease than type 2. Everyone who happens to read this should educate themselves about diabetes for their own well being and for that of their family and friends. It wouldn't hurt to make a donation either because these diseases are very difficult and serious. They last a lifetime and there is no cure, YET! And to you Thumblebug, I send my prayers, hugs, offer encouragement and hope. God bless your child! Mary Ellen

  9. #9
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4,119
    Our bodies convert carbs into sugars. Therefore, it is best to learn about the 'good' and 'bad' sugars and aim to keep the levels even. It is the highs and lows that cause the damage to the organs. Therefore, eat regular meals, don't miss any meals and make sure to take snacks if extra exertion is planned. She will soon learn how long between meals and drinks etc. (I need to 'fill up' every 4 hours to keep happy). The books written by Doctor J. Brand Miller and her team have very good recipes.

  10. #10
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4,119
    Quote Originally Posted by lillybeck View Post
    You not only have to watch the carbs along with the sugar, you need to find out what effecdts the readings. I am type 2 and while I can eat a baked potato I cannot eat rice without soaring on the moniter. Most people can eat about anything they want in moderation.
    I do know the green veggies are the best for all of us and you can stir fry with them. I do make my own soups and stews. Use a lot of chicken so that protein will be good. I do not fry a lot. Also remember that eating something 6 times a day is great for diabetics. I do not much use recipes so cannot help there.
    Indeed. My doctor gave me the best advice many years ago. He was diabetic as well and he told me that diabetics have to watch 3 things: Salt, fat and sugar. It has been very useful advice, as whilst chocolate is low GI generally, it is obviously full of fat- and therefore, off the list! This can be applied to anything one eats.

  11. #11
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,122
    Thank you everyone for your response, to be clear, it is not my child but my great niece.

  12. #12
    Super Member jayelee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Chaumont NY
    Posts
    1,174
    I am a type one diabetic and have been so for close to forty years The best thing to happen to me was an insulin pump it infuses insulin 24 hours a day As a young adult it was easier for my parents to plan out six small meals a day as I got older it was much harder to keep control but my pump now has me regulated But I no longer count sugars but carbs and remember that potatoes and sweets can raise one diabetics levels and pasta anothers My dietician says not to give up everything that anything in moderation can be acceptable To give it up means to want itmore than ever

  13. #13
    Member jraff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Troy, MI
    Posts
    96
    Blog Entries
    1
    My path with a diabetic child is similar to MaryEllen2u's. Daughter diagnosed at age 4. Diagnosis day is still burned in my brain, but we've all learned lots since then - 1988. I immediately took a nutrition class from the continueing ed. dept of our school district that was geared to being heart healthy.

    But I remember some of our favorite snack items were easy to make: frozen grapes. banana popsicles (half a banana on a stick rolled in nuts, grapenuts, or a little dip of melted chocolate chips) frozen pineapple tidbits. It made a fruit exchange "dessert-friendly". Sugar-free jello and popsicles were a bonus. If other kids had candy - sugar free gum was easy enough for other parents to give as an equal treat.

    Since she was the oldest, our other two grew up with great eating habits too. As we travelled, we always carried our own treats - no concession stands for us. The 3 meals and 3 snacks a day make a lot sense.

    Yes, she did acquire an insulin pump when she was 15, and she loves it. Yes, she went away to college. Yes, she worked in a research lab trying to find a cure for Type 1 diabetes at the university. Yes, she graduated and is going on for more schooling with her biology degree. She's 28 now and has helped many diabetics as a pharmacy tech.

    Diabetes is a different way of life, but we've found that she matured faster than her classmates and had to depend on herself for safety and for all the other choices young adults have to make.

    I've got a few other recipes to share if your great niece is interested. Diabetic eating is healthy eating.
    jraff - quilter wannabee

  14. #14
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    new york state
    Posts
    10,531
    Blog Entries
    2
    here is a site I use a lot for recipes.

    http://www.lowcarbluxury.com/lowcarb-entrees.html
    Kindness is a language which the deaf can hear and the blind see.
    mark Twain

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    6
    I read your blog and i have no information or idea on this topic. I will search information on this topic and share with you.
    I share those information which is reliable and important .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.