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Fleamarket find - Singer VS2 fiddleback

Fleamarket find - Singer VS2 fiddleback

Old 05-18-2016, 07:26 AM
  #21  
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I had an opportunity couple weeks ago to buy one at the flea market for $20 ..seller begged me to take it so he could quit unloading/loading back & forth . I just didn't have room/time for it 😢
If it's portable...I could have
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Old 05-18-2016, 07:27 AM
  #22  
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I had an opportunity couple weeks ago to buy one at the flea market for $20 ..seller begged me to take it so he could quit unloading/loading back & forth . I just didn't have room/time for it 😢
If it's portable...I could have.
Show us your finished project when u can...it's a really decent one you saved!
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Old 05-18-2016, 08:08 AM
  #23  
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excellent progress so far!
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Old 05-18-2016, 09:53 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by ndnchf View Post
I just got the ultrasonic recently for other purposes. . . I wouldn't put a painted and decaled part in it,
my husband did that by accident with a bobbin winder still attached to the belt guard. He realized his mistake right away, but it was already too late for the decals on the belt guard.

We also got a tumbler with steel pins, and that helps to shine them up after they are clean.
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Macybaby View Post

We also got a tumbler with steel pins, and that helps to shine them up after they are clean.
By chance is you husband a reloader? I have similar equipment for that purpose. Cleaning up a machine by going from the ultrasonic, to Evaporust (I needed), to polishing makes it a lot easier.
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Old 05-19-2016, 02:48 PM
  #26  
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I've slowly been working on all the bits and pieces. Here are a few of the larger pieces. They certainly don't look like new, but they look much better than they did. I did a little preliminary cleaning of the paint, but I've not yet begun the French polish routine. Maybe I'll start this weekend on that. But I'm under no illusions that there will be a dramatic transformation. But hopefully I can improve it a little.
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Old 05-19-2016, 03:20 PM
  #27  
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Lookin' good.
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Old 05-19-2016, 04:12 PM
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With French polish, remember you are removing dirt and putting on new shellac. It is a chemical process.
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Old 05-20-2016, 01:26 AM
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What is it you call French polish for sewing machines? I was tought French polishing for wood furniture. In the class I took the high gloss finish you see on guitars and violins was not called french polishing, but it's the same process; multiple layers of shellac dissolved in alcohol, and inbetween layers we sprinkled on a very fine milled stone dust to fill in the grain in the wood, sort of buffed up between applications. Shellac dries rather quickly. French polishing was finished by sanding down the gloss with the dust we used. It gave a flawless silky smooth finish which made the wood look very nice. The high gloss shine was made exactly the same way, but finishing of with a layer of shellac. We used woven cotton fabric, made into a ball for the buffing up between layers. On the web now, I have noticed they use the term French polishing for shellac treatments in general. These cabinet restorers had all kinds of traditional recepies for different polishes, waxes and treatments. I suspect Singer only dipped the machines in black dye and spray painted layers of shellac solution (there is a video on the web some where, but I have never found any detailed description of the process).

Last edited by Mickey2; 05-20-2016 at 01:28 AM.
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Old 05-20-2016, 03:30 AM
  #30  
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Mickey2 - Miriam explained it with helpful photos in this thread:

http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage-antique-machine-enthusiasts-f22/lloooonnnngggg-over-due-before-after-singer-redeye-make-over-t235747.html
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