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Thread: making some scrappy blocks

  1. #51
    Super Member Marysewfun's Avatar
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    Thank you, Quilting Addict, for mentioning the Quiltville. I had not come across that yet - but have now - that is great!
    Marysewfun

  2. #52
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    very nice!

  3. #53
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    The polyester fabric that is used to attach bed ruffles is a perfect backing for these scrappy squares. I have tons of it from taking apart bed ruffles for the fabric. I have been wondering what to do with it, and now I know!!!

  4. #54
    Senior Member Quilter Day-by-Day's Avatar
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    If you use dryer sheets for block foundation does it stay together or come apart after a few washings? Does anybody know? If you use batting for the foundation wouldn't you want it bigger for the sashing and then would'nt it be a QAYG block and put backing on?

  5. #55
    Super Member ilovetosew's Avatar
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    I like this block! I made a scrappy block like that, and then trimmed them all to be the same size. It worked out great. I separated them with sashing in a beige tone on tone and the blocks really stand out. I love my quilt!
    Janie

  6. #56
    Senior Member ProudGranny5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildyard
    The polyester fabric that is used to attach bed ruffles is a perfect backing for these scrappy squares. I have tons of it from taking apart bed ruffles for the fabric. I have been wondering what to do with it, and now I know!!!
    Sounds like me wildyard...I saved all mine too. In a tub just waiting to be used!
    Thanks so much for the tute & your blocks are so very pretty. I love the idea of putting a sashing around each block. This is a definate "bookmark".
    Thanks for sharing :)

  7. #57
    Senior Member irma tapia's Avatar
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    Very nice, I have so many scraps and scraps of batting so I guess I should make a scrapy quilt next! Thanks for sharing.

  8. #58
    Senior Member judee0624's Avatar
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    :-) Ahhh, I didn't think to use batting scraps. Good idea!
    judee

  9. #59
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    I can imagine that kids would love looking over these scrappy fabrics and discovering different motifs...like an I Spy quilt.

    I had a friend that made colorwash quilts but she would love to sneak in a tiny object that blended but could be discovered if someone took the time to look closely. Fun!

    We all have scraps, thanks for posting this!

  10. #60
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    Very nice to know this. Thank you for the tutorial.

  11. #61

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    Awhile ago, some one mentioned that Fabric sheets were flammable and not to use them for baby quilts???????
    Anyone remember seeing this on a board?????

  12. #62
    Senior Member irma tapia's Avatar
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    I'm not sure how this works with the batting, dies someone have a tut that qould show how to get started? :roll:

  13. #63
    Super Member clsurz's Avatar
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    Oh my gosh...........this is just right up my alley so to speak. I have to start with this first and see what comes out of it. Thanks for sharing.

  14. #64
    Marion Jean's Avatar
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    What a great idea. This is going to make me think outside of my comfort zone... I'm kind of anal about symmetry and straight lines. I'm definitely going to try this. Thanks! :)

  15. #65
    Super Member Zappycat's Avatar
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    I love these scrappy blocks. I made a quilt for my son like this and it was so much fun. I couldn't stop making the blocks. I would say "Just ome more and then I'll start dinner... Just one more and then I'll clean up...Just one more and then I'll go to bed!!" Well, you get the idea. It was so much fun because each block was different. I always used a fun picture fabric (like animals, or soccer balls...) for the center and then all different width strips around it. I want to start another one soon.

    If you frequent thrift shops and garage sales, you can often find a bolt of inexpensive cotton to use for backing, too. Or sheets will also work nicely. This is a great way to use up scraps!

  16. #66
    Super Member Zappycat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marion Jean
    What a great idea. This is going to make me think outside of my comfort zone... I'm kind of anal about symmetry and straight lines. I'm definitely going to try this. Thanks! :)
    Haha!! Love your comment... I was thinking... this IS MY comfort zone! I'm intimidated by fussy cutting and precise angles, etc! You can't go wrong here! : )

  17. #67
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zappycat
    Quote Originally Posted by Marion Jean
    What a great idea. This is going to make me think outside of my comfort zone... I'm kind of anal about symmetry and straight lines. I'm definitely going to try this. Thanks! :)
    Haha!! Love your comment... I was thinking... this IS MY comfort zone! I'm intimidated by fussy cutting and precise angles, etc! You can't go wrong here! : )
    It is absolutely perfect for a beginner as there is no problem with cutting, seam allowances or anything, all they have to do is to make friends with a quilter and say they are willing to take some scraps off her hands :mrgreen:

  18. #68
    Member grazjo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QM
    I have made a large number of scrappy quilts. This seems to be to be the most versitile method. It is possible to do it without a foundation, but it is much more work. Any foundation will do. I like to use batting scraps. Others in my guild use paper (which needs to be removed) or cheap, prewashed muslin. You can use orphan blocks, paper piecing errors, and just plain scrap. A block may have a theme, or common colors, or not. However you do it, have fun. It will go very quickly.

    I try to start with a non-rectanglar piece in (sorta) the middle of my foundation. I generally try NOT to have everything I add be a rectangle.

  19. #69
    Member grazjo's Avatar
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    This sounds like a great idea. I have done one in the past...but have never put a backing on it yet.
    What size blocks do you sart with?

  20. #70
    Senior Member MoMiMi's Avatar
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    Didn't know there were so many "scrappy" people out there!
    I am one too !

  21. #71
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
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    Thank you QM for being a fellow Project Linus blanketeer. I too have fun stash busting quilts. However, I do not use dryer sheets as foundations any more after learning that all fabric sheets contain an oil base. I have industrial allergies and had a terrible time when I pressed the blocks made with fabric sheets--no wonder. They left a stain on my ironing board too. The residue also turned into a spot on lighter colored fabrics within the blocks that I used with dryer sheets. Presently, I use the cheapest, lightest weight junk fabric I can find and cut that up for my foundation. Then I use my better fabrics on top for strip or scrappy piecing. As for fire safety, well, that is another reason I do not use the used fabric sheets. Happy stitching everyone.

  22. #72
    QM
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    You are very welcome.

    Please notice that Nolee's lovely avatar is another good use of scraps.

    The purpose of the foundation is to hold the shape WHILE you put the block together. You could use old (ironed) newspaper pieces and have the work of tearing them off. I decided to use batting scraps both because I have them and because I am going to need batting anyway. The drier sheet won't fall apart, but if it did, the fabrics are sewn to each other and are as strong as any pieced quilt blocks.

    What I used to use was squares of freezer paper. I got tired of pulling them off again. Also, 18.5" (the width of my freezer paper roll) turned out to be a bit on the wide side for the sort of effect i wanted.

    BTW, I have made blocks that incorporated the sashing. I brought the scrap pieces to a sashing width from 2 edges of my foundation, then put the sashing directly on each block's foundation. For me, the making, folding the foundation back to trim, etc., was much harder than backing the sashings separately. Of course, if you are using you drier sheets or other fabric foundation, the whole question does not arise.

    One time, I used puffy poly batting scraps for the block foundations, sashed normally and used a low loft batting under everything. The poly batting was very awkward ro work with as a foundation, but the results were very cute and cuddly.

    I read somewhere that someone used sheets of the water soluable interfacing for scrappy blocks. To me, that seemed to be a way to throw your money away, since almost any fabric is cheaper per yard.

  23. #73
    QM
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    Note that I have heavy duty allergies and don't use drier sheet for anything.

    The size of your blocks in unimportant. It should be something you are comfortable with. I have done 18.5", which is too big to make the kind of free form pattern I enjoy. I have made 6" subblocks, which I posted, I usually now use either 9" or 12" (finished size) blocks. If you want to go to the work of serious layouts, you could have different sizes and shapes in a single quilt. I have not done that one ...YET.

  24. #74
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    In our quilt guild we have a scrap bag exchange. You take agallon bagg and fill it up with your scraps. you can fill up to 3 bags per person. Each person then can take another's bag for everyone they bring in up to the three bags. We then make scrap quilts out of those fabrics.

  25. #75
    QM
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    that sounds like a great idea. sometimes we can be very tired of our own scraps.

    My DH reminded me of a couple of points I should have made.
    1. If your foundation is an old sheet or something like that, it is a good idea to stabilize it with startch or sizing before you begin.

    2. If you are not comfortable working with bias, it's probably a good idea to stay stitch (machine baste) the edges of the block less than 1/4" from the edge to keep everything in place and stable until you sew the blocks together.

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