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Thread: Quilt as you go in columns

  1. #1
    Senior Member nvb50's Avatar
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    Quilt as you go in columns

    I do a modified quilt as you go.

    1. complete all your blocks and sew them together in thirds. I do mine in columns.

    2. sandwich 1/3 of the top with batting 3 inches wider on the left and right. (or more on the left depending on the boarder)

    3. sandwich the entire back, lining up the left side even with the batting.

    4. Quilt that section how ever you want.

    5. Attach another section of batting to the previous batting, making sure that the top or the backing is not in the way.

    6. place the next section of the top face down on the previous top section and using a 1/4 inch seam.

    7. Sandwich that section together and proceed with the next quilting.

    8. Attach the 3rd section like you did the 2nd section.

    9. I attach the boarders either before or after the quilting depending on what look I am trying to get.

    I have done all my quilts that are bigger than a twin size.

  2. #2
    Super Member Flowergurl's Avatar
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    Could we have pics? I am a visual learner.

  3. #3
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    Sounds like Marti Michell's book "Machine Quilting In Sections", printed 2004. You may be able to find it in your local library or get it used at Amazon.com, plenty of pictures there.

    NVB50, good to hear from someone who has actually used her system and likes it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member LindaJ's Avatar
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    Thanks, will have to try that. Sounds like it would be easier to machine quilt that way.
    Linda J.

  5. #5
    Super Member vickig626's Avatar
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    I love this idea! I do the usual 1 block at a time but will need to try this version. Thanks!!
    Life's More Fun with a Doxie !!
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    Vicki G
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  6. #6
    Senior Member nvb50's Avatar
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    The next time I do a quilt I will take pictures. I will be away from my machine for a couple of weeks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member nvb50's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elnan View Post
    Sounds like Marti Michell's book "Machine Quilting In Sections", printed 2004. You may be able to find it in your local library or get it used at Amazon.com, plenty of pictures there.

    NVB50, good to hear from someone who has actually used her system and likes it.
    I have never read the book. I came up with this on my own to be able to use my embroidery machine for the actual quilting. thanks

  8. #8
    Super Member annette1952's Avatar
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    I just finished a king sized quilt in Jan. for a gift using this method. I have Marti Michells book but I watched some videos by Candy Glendering at Candied Fabrics. I am a visual person. It worked really well & it is easy.

  9. #9
    Senior Member nvb50's Avatar
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    I did not realize that there was a book on it. I am a self taught quilter. I had to come up with something because I did not want anyone to work on my quilt but me.

  10. #10
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    Ran into a "Negative Nelly" who tried to tell me they wouldn't last long done like this. Then her mother said the quilt she made for her was done that way. The quilt is 15 years old and still looks great. It gets a lot of use. Yay!!!!

  11. #11
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    2. sandwich 1/3 of the top with batting 3 inches wider on the left and right. (or more on the left depending on the boarder)

    3. sandwich the entire back, lining up the left side even with the batting.

    4. Quilt that section how ever you want.

    5. Attach another section of batting to the previous batting, making sure that the top or the backing is not in the way.

    That sounds rather conflicting like 2 layers of batting. Explain? Please? and Thanks

    I had the Marti Mitchell book and never could understand what she was talking about. Plus there was a lot of hand finishing which I don't like. I remember some being on the diagonal. That's why I do block by block. I prefer sashing to hand sewing.

  12. #12
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Marti Michell's book "Machine Quilting in Sections", covers this technique and several more. It's nice to have different options.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  13. #13
    Senior Member NatalieF's Avatar
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    fantastic! thanks so much for sharing, this will make my life so much easier. I could only think of doing it with sashing between the quilted panels, but with this method that's not necessary at all. Whohoo!

  14. #14
    Senior Member cherylmae's Avatar
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    That is one of the smartest ways of quilting a large quilt that I have heard of.

  15. #15
    Super Member lizzy's Avatar
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    Quilting in sections

    Quote Originally Posted by elnan View Post
    Sounds like Marti Michell's book "Machine Quilting In Sections", printed 2004. You may be able to find it in your local library or get it used at Amazon.com, plenty of pictures there.

    NVB50, good to hear from someone who has actually used her system and likes it.
    I used this method after seeing it in a magazine article. The first quilt i tried was a king size quilt and this made it so easy that I have continued to used the same method on my large quilts.
    Lizzy in La.

  16. #16
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
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    I attended a mini session of demonstrating quilt as you go at a quilt show. That gal taught us it's a very old technique. She said during the civil war ladies made individual blocks and they got together and joined them together this way to make quilts to give to soldiers. Sure was a smart way to handle it.
    Mavis

  17. #17
    Senior Member tate_elliott's Avatar
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    I've recently gotten interested in this technique because I'm about to attempt my first queen-sized quilt. Some people have posted asking for pictures. Well, this is how I imagine doing this, I hope the graphic will look okay once I post it.

    First of all, this is not exactly the same as the original poster described, although it is similar. As I envision it, you complete the top, then lay out the backing, good side down. Next, cut about one-third of your batting and center it on the backing. Finally, place the quilt top on top, good side up. In other words, the only difference between this and the normal procedure is that we're using only part of the batting. See Step 1 graphic - the blue is the top, yellow is the batting, and the brown is the backing.

    Now baste the batting area, leaving a couple of inches untouched on the left and right edges of the batting, indicated by the two lines. Roll up the right side of the quilt (which is much thinner since there's no batting) and put the quilt in your sewing machine with the rolled up section in the throat. Then quilt the area between the two lines, shown in Step 2. (No comments on my quilting, please.)

    Next, fold the right-hand side of the top back onto the center of the top, and fold the backing underneath, so now the right-hand edge of the batting is exposed. (This isn't shown because my graphic skills aren't up to the task.) Take a section of the batting you cut off and butt it against the exposed batting. Zig zag the two together. Or use a lightweight fusible interfacing to attach the two pieces. Then unfold the top and backing and baste the quilt. You can now quilt the right-hand side of the quilt in your sewing machine. Step 3 illustrates how it should look when you are finished.

    Step 4 shows the quilt turned halfway around. By following the steps for Step 3 again, you can complete the quilting.

    Whew, this took longer than I expected. As I said at the beginning, I haven't done this yet, this is just the way I picture doing it.

    Tate

    Name:  QuiltingInSections.png
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    Last edited by tate_elliott; 05-01-2016 at 01:09 PM.
    King of the Rocketeers!

  18. #18
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    Good luck!!
    Quote Originally Posted by tate_elliott View Post
    I've recently gotten interested in this technique because I'm about to attempt my first queen-sized quilt. Some people have posted asking for pictures. Well, this is how I imagine doing this, I hope the graphic will look okay once I post it.

    First of all, this is not exactly the same as the original poster described, although it is similar. As I envision it, you complete the top, then lay out the backing, good side down. Next, cut about one-third of your batting and center it on the backing. Finally, place the quilt top on top, good side up. In other words, the only difference between this and the normal procedure is that we're using only part of the batting. See Step 1 graphic - the blue is the top, yellow is the batting, and the brown is the backing.

    Now baste the batting area, leaving a couple of inches untouched on the left and right edges of the batting, indicated by the two lines. Roll up the right side of the quilt (which is much thinner since there's no batting) and put the quilt in your sewing machine with the rolled up section in the throat. Then quilt the area between the two lines, shown in Step 2. (No comments on my quilting, please.)

    Next, fold the right-hand side of the top back onto the center of the top, and fold the backing underneath, so now the right-hand edge of the batting is exposed. (This isn't shown because my graphic skills aren't up to the task.) Take a section of the batting you cut off and butt it against the exposed batting. Zig zag the two together. Or use a lightweight fusible interfacing to attach the two pieces. Then unfold the top and backing and baste the quilt. You can now quilt the right-hand side of the quilt in your sewing machine. Step 3 illustrates how it should look when you are finished.

    Step 4 shows the quilt turned halfway around. By following the steps for Step 3 again, you can complete the quilting.

    Whew, this took longer than I expected. As I said at the beginning, I haven't done this yet, this is just the way I picture doing it.

    Tate

    Name:  QuiltingInSections.png
Views: 247
Size:  21.4 KB

  19. #19
    QM
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    Yes, I recall seeing that method on the old Simply Quilts. I have done it. It works. It's especially good if you want a double sided quilt with aligned quilting.

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