Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31

Thread: Before and after

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29

    Before and after

    Thanks to everybody that helped me with information about our Minnesota New Model A sewing machine. We found it in the basement of the farm house we are renting. The landlord gave me permission to try to bring it back to its former glory. After months of sanding by hand, I decided not to replace any of the original but, instead just to try to get it to work so we could have a beautiful working display. The machine originally did not move at all. It took a lot of PB Blaster and elbow grease and a new belt and the machine moves perfectly. I took the treadle and pitman arm off and applied grease to those areas as well.

    The first picture is the condition in which we found it. The second picture is after sanding and applying a stain.

    Name:  20190106_205522(2).jpg
Views: 868
Size:  136.2 KB

    Name:  20190512_152245(2).jpg
Views: 864
Size:  109.1 KB

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    21
    Looks like you did a great job restoring it!

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Thank you. I still have to get a gloss on it. I am also going to take the cast iron off and repaint that as well.

  4. #4
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    19,228
    Wow, you did wonders with it! It looks great!
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/sewbizgirl
    Boom 20 Album of Blocks I made to swap https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...bums19942.html
    "The reward of a thing well done is having done it." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Thank you. I need to add a gloss. I am debating whether I should use a shellac or polyurethane. I was told that a shellac would be better for the vintage look and trying to keep it as original as possible.

  6. #6
    Super Member luvstoquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Yorkville, IL
    Posts
    6,082
    Blog Entries
    3
    It is beautiful. I would love to add a Treadle to my sewing room.
    "You must do the thing you think you cannot do"....E. Roosevelt

    Sharon
    Yorkville, IL

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,845
    That hardly looks like it's the same machine. Just needed a little love and a lot of elbow grease

  8. #8
    Super Member leonf's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    near Topeka kansas
    Posts
    2,354
    I would vote shellac. Poly make everything look like plastic.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Thank you!

  10. #10
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,583
    Blog Entries
    1
    Use shellac
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Thanks Glenn. I bought a clear shellac today. What's the best way to apply it, with a lintless shirt or a brush?

  12. #12
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,583
    Blog Entries
    1
    You can apply the shellac to the cabinet with a good brush. Apply in two thin coats. Let dry two or three hours between coats then rub down with 0000 steel wool and wax. This should give you the finish you are looking for.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    River City, Orygun
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by leonf View Post
    I would vote shellac. Poly make everything look like plastic.
    Not true. You can't lump all poly's into the same group.

    Shellac is going about it the hard (old) way, and the finish won't be nearly as nice if the application isn't near perfect. Shellacing is more labor intensive and not nearly as forgiving. There's a better option in terms of appearance and durability.

    Wipe On Poly (satin) from Min-Wax. Pour a little onto your work and rub into your wood with a cloth until nearly dry. Second coat can be applied (direct w/o sanding) when dry, which is normally about an hour in good conditions. Subsequent coats dry quicker than the first if you want more than two. I sand only to remove any dirt/dust in the finish- using a fine Scotchbrite. This is usually not necessary as the hand rubbing pretty much eliminates the dust, unless you are drying in dusty conditions. Brushed on shellac will have dust which then needs to be removed. Shellac application requires a fair bit of experience to eliminate the dry areas at the end of strokes. Not so with the hand rubbed poly.

    This finish is really close to a hand rubbed oil piece. No grain fill like you would imagine with a sprayed two-part poly. I've used it for restore's and new custom pieces. The only drawback is that it "yellows" the new woods slightly. In that case sprayed lacquer is the answer.

    Try a small piece using both products. You'll put that shellac back on the shelf.

  14. #14
    Super Member ppquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Wonderful WY
    Posts
    1,331
    Nice job on that! Looks great!
    Born to Quilt, Forced to work. Retired and quilting!

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Thank you. I am going to do the shellac this weekend possibly. Hope it turns out well!

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Hamburg,Western New York State
    Posts
    4,798
    Kudos to you...beautiful job.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-14-2019 at 11:15 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by ppquilter View Post
    Nice job on that! Looks great!
    Thank you. It has been a long process.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by BonnieJP View Post
    Looks like you did a great job restoring it!
    Thank you. We decided not to try to replace any of the broken wood. I think it adds character.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by sewbizgirl View Post
    Wow, you did wonders with it! It looks great!
    Thank you. This is actually my first time doing anything like a restore or reconditioning. I was amazed at how well it turned out.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by trolleystation View Post
    Kudos to you...beautiful job.
    Thank you. It has been a long process. Next thing to do is to remove the cast iron, try to get some of the rust off, and paint it.

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by ppquilter View Post
    Nice job on that! Looks great!
    Thank you. I am going to do the shellac this weekend possibly. Hope it turns out well!

  22. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by trolleystation View Post
    Kudos to you...beautiful job.
    Thank you.

  23. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    89
    My favorite way to use shellac is with a ball of t-shirt material inside a good linen or cotton cloth. Wind up the ball and put just a bit of thinned shellac on the ball. Rub the shellac into the surface with a circular motion. It will be dry by time you get to the other side so you can start over. You are putting on a tiny amount each pass. After a few passes, put a couple drops of olive oil on the surface and include it in your next pass. Do this a few evenings and you will be amazed. It is the basic of French polishing, but I don't go to that extreme.

  24. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by Friar_Tuck View Post
    My favorite way to use shellac is with a ball of t-shirt material inside a good linen or cotton cloth. Wind up the ball and put just a bit of thinned shellac on the ball. Rub the shellac into the surface with a circular motion. It will be dry by time you get to the other side so you can start over. You are putting on a tiny amount each pass. After a few passes, put a couple drops of olive oil on the surface and include it in your next pass. Do this a few evenings and you will be amazed. It is the basic of French polishing, but I don't go to that extreme.
    I watched a video on the technique you are talking about. It seems to me that applying with a brush is asking for trouble with me. I heard that shellac can be unforgiving and knowing me, i would have all kinds of brush streaks. I have a bag of t shirt material and i was just going to make the ball with that. Will i need to add denatured alcohol to my shellac? I have pre mixed shellac. (Turns out that zinsser is pre mixed 2 lb cut).

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by pslaght View Post
    I watched a video on the technique you are talking about. It seems to me that applying with a brush is asking for trouble with me. I heard that shellac can be unforgiving and knowing me, i would have all kinds of brush streaks. I have a bag of t shirt material and i was just going to make the ball with that. Will i need to add denatured alcohol to my shellac? I have pre mixed shellac. (Turns out that zinsser is pre mixed 2 lb cut).
    If it were me, I would put the zinsser in a squirt bottle, and some denatured alcohol in another, then give about equal squirts into the ball.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.