Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main > For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts
Fixing chipped paint on a Singer 99-13 >

Fixing chipped paint on a Singer 99-13

Fixing chipped paint on a Singer 99-13

Old 05-03-2021, 09:45 PM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Default Fixing chipped paint on a Singer 99-13

Is there any way to fix chipped paint on a Singer 99-13? It's around the edge of the base all the way around and one side is worse than the other. I don't want to attempt to paint it and have it look botched. Or is there any way to seal it so it doesn't chip further and is protected?
melissam707 is offline  
Old 05-04-2021, 02:23 AM
  #2  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Ontario
Posts: 282
Default

If it's flaking paint then I would look up Alex Askaroff on YT, if it's merely chipped then I would personally leave it alone
Hooligan is offline  
Old 05-04-2021, 04:04 AM
  #3  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 2,283
Default

Originally Posted by melissam707 View Post
Is there any way to fix chipped paint on a Singer 99-13? It's around the edge of the base all the way around and one side is worse than the other. I don't want to attempt to paint it and have it look botched. Or is there any way to seal it so it doesn't chip further and is protected?
I would ask Glenn. He posted the thread at the top of this page. https://www.quiltingboard.com/vintag...s-t193635.html.

He doesn't post here very often, but always answers that thread.

bkay
bkay is offline  
Old 05-04-2021, 12:40 PM
  #4  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Default

Thank you, I've looked him up and he talks about mixing polyurethane and white spirits together to put over flaking. I'm not sure if my machine is flaked or chipped? Here is a photo of it.


Originally Posted by Hooligan View Post
If it's flaking paint then I would look up Alex Askaroff on YT, if it's merely chipped then I would personally leave it alone
melissam707 is offline  
Old 05-04-2021, 01:33 PM
  #5  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Ontario
Posts: 282
Default

@melissam707 looks chipped to me and will ok to use as is. You won't cause any more damage to it through normal use Just had a harder life is all, tells a story
Hooligan is offline  
Old 05-06-2021, 03:24 AM
  #6  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 41
Default

With that much chipping, it will be hard to repair and not look "repaired". I know people have used the model car paint from the Hobby stores to touch up small chips on machines.
Patg is offline  
Old 05-06-2021, 06:47 AM
  #7  
Super Member
 
thepolyparrot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Mars
Posts: 2,490
Default

I think Glenn had directions for fixing chipped shellac in that thread somewhere. It involved using a black aniline dye powder to create a black shellac.

I fixed the front edge of the bed of a 66 with his method:





It was tedious, requiring many thin coats to build up the shellac, but it was really nice when it was done.
thepolyparrot is offline  
Old 05-07-2021, 10:51 AM
  #8  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 42
Default

That looks amazing!! Is the dye just dye for wood or something else? And what do you mix with it to create shellac?
melissam707 is offline  
Old 05-07-2021, 12:25 PM
  #9  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 2,283
Default

Originally Posted by melissam707 View Post
That looks amazing!! Is the dye just dye for wood or something else? And what do you mix with it to create shellac?
Shellac is shellac. It's what they used to use like varnish. You can buy it in a can or make your own with shellac chips and alcohol(?), if I remember correctly. You would probably get the dye from the same place. I think Rocklers has it. They have stores in large cities or sell online. They might have it at a hardware store or a Home Depot type store.

It's the technique you need to know. I would find the actual instructions where Glenn tells how to do it. Or I would post and ask him for the instructions. I think he posts regularly at the VSS. Or, you can post on the thread above and he will answer.
bkay.
bkay is offline  
Old 05-07-2021, 04:55 PM
  #10  
Super Member
 
OurWorkbench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 2,725
Default

I wouldn't use polyurethane on an antique machine. The shellac would be the way I would prefer. Both seem tedious and need patience that I don't have. That probably is a real good machine. I know Miriam has a machine that looks like it was "rode hard" but not put away wet. She was quite happy with the way it sews.

I think I would probably just wipe it down good with sewing machine oil and call it good. Should I want to do something a little bit more protective, I would use some car wax. I know it is recommended that a carnauba wax be used and https://singer-featherweight.com/products/zymol recommends and evidently sells Zymol. I have seen it in auto parts stores and Walmart may even have it.

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
Not affiliated with off-site link(s)
OurWorkbench is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.