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Thread: How to Clean Up and use a vintage sewing machine - videos by Muv and Fav

  1. #101
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    I don't know how to use this site I just joined today. I have a Hilton deluxe machine. Model 766 and I would like to use it but I need a operating manual, would I be able to get some help from someone here.
    sorry to bother you.

  2. #102
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyjg47 View Post
    I don't know how to use this site I just joined today. I have a Hilton deluxe machine. Model 766 and I would like to use it but I need a operating manual, would I be able to get some help from someone here.
    sorry to bother you.
    Is it a clone or something more complicated? A picture would help identify the machine. reading info:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...p-t164361.html
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  3. #103
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/richard_silvia/5441561183/

    Don't know if this link will work but it is a picture of a Hilton Deluxe
    Sweet Caroline

  4. #104
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    It is a Hilton sewing machine not a resort area...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  5. #105
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    Thread regulator screw question

    Hello everyone, I am new to this site - I usually just read posts and use the info from them! I do have a question, I am restoring a May 19, 1925 Singer Sphinz. I am wondering if the thread regulator screw comes off for easy cleaning? It won't turn, and thought I would ask before forcing it. Thanks! Anna

  6. #106
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by new-quilter View Post
    Hello everyone, I am new to this site - I usually just read posts and use the info from them! I do have a question, I am restoring a May 19, 1925 Singer Sphinz. I am wondering if the thread regulator screw comes off for easy cleaning? It won't turn, and thought I would ask before forcing it. Thanks! Anna
    NOPE don't pull it out. They are a pain to put back together. You can pull it part way out and clean the threads. If you oil it it will oil the works when you get it back in.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  7. #107
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    Thanks for the quick response!

  8. #108
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    Good morning, I have another cleaning question....What is a good way to clean the grooves in the various screws? I have the awesome MAAS cream, but a toothbrush doesn't seem to want to get down in the deep places. Suggestions, please?

  9. #109
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by new-quilter View Post
    Good morning, I have another cleaning question....What is a good way to clean the grooves in the various screws? I have the awesome MAAS cream, but a toothbrush doesn't seem to want to get down in the deep places. Suggestions, please?

    0000 (Extra fine) Steel wool)

  10. #110
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    Thanks SteveH. I'm sure my husband has some of that in the garage!

  11. #111
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    Had a great bit of luck yesterday when I became the proud owner of a 1918 Singer 99K. Not in terrible condition but will certainly look better with some TLC. I'll post some before and after photos. Here is the before image of the cover for the accessories box:

    And the after:

    The underside of the same item before:

    And after:

    I'll post more as they are completed. Stitch
    Attached Images Attached Images




  12. #112
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    very nice! Now, how about a little "here's how I did it.."?? hehe

  13. #113
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    Hi SteveH,
    I like to keep things simple. This is my method. I don't claim it's the perfect way to go but it works for me.First job I do is gently attempt to give the handwheel a turn. If it turns and a needle is attached I check if the needle accurately passes through the hole in the needle plate. My reasoning is that if you get this far then chances are it's a machine worth working on.Next I remove needle, foot, needle plate and any bobbins and thread. Then I remove the machine head from its base and take off handcrank, stop motion screw assembly, handwheel and bobbin winder. I give the machine head and all the other metal pieces which are now detached a good spray with a penetrating oil (WD40) The wooden base or treadle table I coat with a good amount of water-soluble paint stripper. This will remove any varnish/paint/oil/dirt and can be washed away with soapy water without being too harsh on the wooden surface. I then let the wooden parts dry completely and then I firmly but gently give any external surfaces a thorough sanding being careful not to over do it. I then give all external wooden surfaces a good dose of wax furniture polish and then hand buff with a soft cloth. That's it for the wood - no more varnish! I like to see the grain of the wood and if a few dents are visible they give a little character. To clean non painted bare steel parts I use an abrasive cloth such as scotchbrite and very fine abrasive paper. To clean any painted (japanned) parts sewing machine oil and a soft cloth. Treadle ironwork I like to strip back and use a black aerosol spray paint such as hammerite. Hope this helps.

  14. #114
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    Hi all,
    Here are some more before and after shots. Here is a before of the machine base. No real damage but not looking too good:

    And here is the after shot. A careful use of paint stripper to go back to bare wood. Then a gentle but firm sanding and a good quantity of wax furniture polish:

    Next is a before of one of the clips on the base where the cover attaches:

    And the after shot:

    More coming soon folks. Stitch
    Attached Images Attached Images




  15. #115
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    for the metal work I would suggest you try Brasso and 0000 Steel wool. (The 0000 Steel wool will also do amazing things to the wood without the usual scratching that sand paper gives)

    Great job and thanks for sharing what you do!

  16. #116
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    Very nice looking job cleaning it up.
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  17. #117
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    Hi folks here are some more pieces. Firstly the before shot of the other corner where the lid catch fits:

    and after:

    Next the bobbin winder. Here is the before:

    I didn't completely dismantle this part but did remove some bits particularly the thread guides and the cam. All in serviceable order but dirty. Here is the after shot. Admittedly not a huge amount of difference!

    That's all for now. Stitch
    Attached Images Attached Images




  18. #118
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    Thank You so much I feel like I'm jumping off a cliff these will surely help....

  19. #119
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    Thank you so much I saved all the video info. for future reference.

  20. #120
    Senior Member DonnaFreak's Avatar
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    Thanks Miriam! I just found a Singer model 66 today for $20!!! It has a bit of rust on it and is really dusty, so I'm sure the innards need a good thorough cleaning as well. You timed this perfect!! 😄

    Donna
    DonnaFreak

    "Some days it's just not worth it to chew through the leather straps."

  21. #121
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    Can someone point me to a tutorial on cleaning the bobbin area on a 201? I got it apart and hung my head in shame for letting it get that dirty, right after I realized that, no, I didn't break the clip. Whew!

    Now I need to get it lined up and back in place.
    Life is made up of bits and pieces. You won't know how it'll turn out till its done.

  22. #122
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    Oh, I figured it out. The bobbin tension is on the left and doesn't turn so that went into place. A couple of gentle tries to understand the clip opposite the operator goes first then use the tiny screwdriver to put the other in place. Hey, I think she likes me better now!
    Life is made up of bits and pieces. You won't know how it'll turn out till its done.

  23. #123
    Senior Member sherian's Avatar
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    thanks for the information I will check it out. Happy4th of July
    I wish the good people working on this sewing machines could sell them here. Then you would know you were getting a great sewing machine. And information needed. I did sell one embroidery machine, at 1/2 of used price given to me by All brands. I bought a upgrade. It has been years ago, I did hear from board but sent information of price with backup from All brands and received ok. I am not a trouble maker I follow the rules. Sold on private side by interested party all were happy. I don't think you can do that only more. It would be nice to have a page for selling & buying.They could say board not responsible your on your own, but that may be in today's world not possible. We are not in the old days, when things were not so crazy. Buyer was happy throw in some extra's and I was too with my new machine. All brands now sells used or trade in machines. I helps them sells new machines for used ones and gets others buying trade in to get into the sewing world and classes, plus store items.
    Last edited by sherian; 07-04-2015 at 07:42 PM.

  24. #124
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    This weekend I discovered the joys of rust removal by electricity!!!

    NOTE OF CAUTION: Electricity is dangerous. Water is dangerous, water AND electricity combined is REALLY dangerous!!!!

    Car battery charger
    5 gal bucket
    4 gallons of water combined with 4 tablespoons of baking soda
    piece of scrap steel for the anode (red wire connects here)
    rusty parts (black wire connects here)


    30 minutes = Part clean

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    parts before
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    parts after
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  25. #125
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    I'm going to have to try that.

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

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