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Thread: How to Clean Up and use a vintage sewing machine - videos by Muv and Fav

  1. #126
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    This is just like having Laser surgery on my eyes, my biggest complaint is that I waited so long to try it....

    It really was just as easy as can be.
    When I think of all of the parts that I wire wheeled by hand......

    EDIT: Once removed the parts do need to be scrubbed to remove the now loosened stuff

    EDIT: additional CAUTION. this process makes bubbles. those bubbles are hydrogen and oxygen being seperated. DO NOT DO this in an inclosed location.
    Last edited by SteveH; 08-31-2015 at 03:56 PM.

  2. #127
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
    ...EDIT: additional CAUTION. this process makes bubbles. those bubbles are hydrogen and oxygen being seperated. DO NOT DO this in an inclosed location.
    Well phooey. What fun is it if you have to use caution?

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

  3. #128
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    i don't know about more fun, unless you mean that by using caution you can have fun for longer! hehe

  4. #129
    Super Member Rodney's Avatar
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    I've used electrolytic rust removal for larger things like woodworking machinery. It does wonders for cleaning up cast iron. It only removes rust, good metal isn't harmed. Baking soda works, washing soda is a little better. You can leave parts in the solution for as long as you want with no damage. It also softens up old paint so it's easier to remove. I do find it's faster for me to wire wheel small items though.
    You can build a tank as large as you need to. I've seen car bodies cleaned this way. I use an 18 gallon Rubbermaid tub for most of my stuff. I've also used a kiddy pool for larger items like my tablesaw cabinet.
    Sometimes newer "smart" battery chargers don't want to work unless there is a battery in the circuit as well.
    I bought a 12VDC power supply for running my tank.
    The biggest downside is you have to occasionally clean the anode or replace it.

    Here's a good explanation of the process: http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/Rus...ctrolysis.ashx
    Rodney
    "Neglect to oil the machine will shorten its life and cause you

    trouble and annoyance" Quote from Singer Model 99 Manual

  5. #130
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    Dalton, GA
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    Rodney,

    If you will use carbon rods for the anode you will keep a cleaner solution and the anodes stay cleaner. I've used electrolysis for years in the machine shop and cleaning old cast iron cookware.

    David

  6. #131
    Super Member nunnyJo's Avatar
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    thank u for all of these.

  7. #132
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    Jan 2016
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    What cleaning product have you used with successfully to clean mocha 301? Tried soap and water and paint came off in a small spot.

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