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  • If you were to ground/earth an old sewing machine

    Old 07-29-2018, 08:54 PM
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    Default If you were to ground/earth an old sewing machine

    would you ground the motor or the body or both?

    Not actually planning to do it, Iíve just been wondering 🤔 (staying up too late watching youtube videos about electronics)
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    Old 07-30-2018, 02:33 AM
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    I remember seeing one where they had grounded the light to the deck... but that's the only reference I can remember. I think it was all because of rewiring using a polarized cord.

    Sounds like we had similar evenings! I researched if an electronic pedal powering a 110-120volt 0.7amp motor will be within limits to use on a 100-110volt 0.6amp. I'm 'fairly' certain it's well within in range. (read: 2014 Singer Simple wiring adapted to 1928 Singer 101 potted motor).

    This is going to be fun...
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    Old 07-30-2018, 05:19 AM
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    There is a thread here I confess I haven't read the whole thing. John suggested the bed as that is the metal mostly touched when using the machine.

    Another one here


    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.

    Last edited by OurWorkbench; 07-30-2018 at 05:22 AM. Reason: additional link
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    Old 07-30-2018, 05:50 AM
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    If you have an old British machine, you may find it needs positive ground instead of negative. HEHE Bad old Brit gearhead joke. Love British Roadsters.
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    Old 07-30-2018, 06:19 AM
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    Originally Posted by leonf
    Love British Roadsters.
    My Father sold his restored '53 MGTD a month before I turned 16.

    My feelings toward them are slightly different. =P
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    Old 07-30-2018, 02:19 PM
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    I have seen three core true grounding on 201Ks, not very often but the odd one turn up now and then. The standard eventually became what they call double insulation, and were given the squre within a square mark; it's up to todays standards, and most electrical equipment from 1950 and up has it. There is a few things that might be pointed out today, on some plugs the wire ends (flat round things on the end of wires fitted to the back of the three prong socket) are half exposed, these need attention and a clever way about it should sort tings out. Most electrical equipment from 1930s and up are very close to current standards and there should be solutions to safely rewire old motors. You can't use these machines in wet rooms like the bath, or too close the kitchen sink, but the living room is fine, and in most cases the kitchen table too.
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    Old 08-09-2018, 08:02 PM
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    Well, I did it after all
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    Old 09-26-2018, 06:28 PM
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    LOVE your final picture. My son-in-law is an electrician. I have to show him this because I have a 15-91 in a cabinet that needs this. Thanks!
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    Old 10-06-2018, 02:57 AM
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    Originally Posted by LoriH58
    LOVE your final picture. My son-in-law is an electrician. I have to show him this because I have a 15-91 in a cabinet that needs this. Thanks!
    I have to take these wires out and replace them because itís car wire, not for wall voltage. Probably shouldve read the package better
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    Old 10-07-2018, 05:35 AM
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    Smokey- Copper wire doesn't know whether it's plugged into 12vdc or 120vac. What's important is the ampacity of the wire, and it's ability to handle the load. Check an ampacity chart to calculate the load and required wire size.

    The loom you have appears to be a trailer light wire- typically 18 ga. May be a bit small. A 3 wire extension cord in 14-16 gauge will work.
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