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Thread: Just unearthed my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758!

  1. #51
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  2. #52
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Ok,.. I have a couple of guesses.

    First,.. there's another bunch of spots you can oil that might help. I found one of the machines here with that same mechanism, and it was stiff, maybe not as stiff as yours, but stiff enough my hand's a little sore from all of the playing. (Or that could be partly from the complete dis-assembly of a featherweight today too) Oiling these spots made a difference. It's still not perfect, but it's possible it'll loosen up overnight too.

    In the first picture, I've removed the rod and the actuator to show more clearly where I want you to oil. Do both sides of the pin, the side you can see, then the other side that you only see when that metal tab is all the way out. You'll see that the pin moves in and out of the body of the machine, so it needs to be free moving.

    In pic number 2, get where that rod starts to disappear into the gear. Again, it's a fairly tight tolerance, and needs some freedom to move.

    In Pic 3, the top of the machine, oil all three spots indicated.

    Sometimes I oil as I'm actuating, so that I can get the most possible oil in.

    Now actuate that puppy a bunch of times from the bottom and see if it starts to loosen up. (watch out for spray if you oiled a little more than needed. I got a bunch of it in the face because I was leaned close to watch.)

    Now, take a break and let it seep in and do its work.

    Second, the collar on the actuator looks like it's a touch lower than the shaft it rides on. This is about leverage. If that collar is too low, you're working too hard to push the actuator. If it's too high though, the actuator will bind on the metal piece and it won't work properly either. I'd like you to leave this til last though, because I found that adjusting that collar was a real pain in the a.... uhm... rear. The hex screw btw is probably metric. It's not quite a good fit for a 1/16" hex key, it should be a size up, but 5/64 is too big.


    Also, I see a shine on the rubber gears above the area we're working on. It would be a really good idea to get that off the gears. Oil / grease will eat the rubber, then you'll have to replace the gears. Not one of Singer's better ideas.
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  3. #53
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Those gears are rubber!? Yeah I did oil them. Ack! *runs to wipe it off*

    Ok so I will oil the places you say. I think I need to go out and buy a more precise oil container. I have some difficulty reaching certain places. But yes more oil and I will be back to report findings after work! (I think I need more oil too! Wait... I'm waiting on a bottle of tri... I'm going to have a whole tool box at this rate!)
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  4. #54
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
    Those gears are rubber!? Yeah I did oil them. Ack! *runs to wipe it off*

    Ok so I will oil the places you say. I think I need to go out and buy a more precise oil container. I have some difficulty reaching certain places. But yes more oil and I will be back to report findings after work! (I think I need more oil too! Wait... I'm waiting on a bottle of tri... I'm going to have a whole tool box at this rate!)
    Go to a bicycle shop or sew-classic and get some Triflow - that stuff is great for what you are trying to do.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  5. #55
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    I am currently waiting for an order from sew classic. with triflow in it.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  6. #56
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Yup!! It's hard to tell until you see one that's crumbled.

    I use a monojet syringe (I think it's called an oral syringe.) Jenny also sells them. Next batch of pictures I take, I'll try to remember to take a pic for you. The Zoom Spout oilers work pretty well too, just don't loose the little cap, it's unbelievably messy if you do.

    I already have a couple of toolboxes and "parts bins". This way I keep these tools clean, not grungy from the garage projects, etc.

    I should probably be extolling the virtues of triflow, but until today I had a heck of a time finding it. Sew-Classic can't ship it to me, so I had to hunt it down. Finally found it (really expensive though)

  7. #57
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
    Those gears are rubber!? Yeah I did oil them. Ack! *runs to wipe it off*

    Ok so I will oil the places you say. I think I need to go out and buy a more precise oil container. I have some difficulty reaching certain places. But yes more oil and I will be back to report findings after work! (I think I need more oil too! Wait... I'm waiting on a bottle of tri... I'm going to have a whole tool box at this rate!)
    Re: the tool box
    Won't be long before you will have more than one if you are going to be doing your own repairs. Especially if you become a machine collector (ugh addict) like some of us.
    Sweet Caroline

  8. #58
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Hahaha. Well my boyfriend gifted me for my a birthday a singer organizer that has room for several large spools of threads, little spools, pins, bobbins, etc. I managed to fit some other things in there and then I have a small makeup train case I picked up at goodwill for like 3 bucks with mY rotary cutters, more pins, needles and stuff like that. so far most of the machines have their own "goody bags" easily kept with the machine. I don't know whether to keep it like or get another box and label different compartments for each machine part.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  9. #59
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    We should do a new whole thread on pics of our tool boxes some time... I picked up a big tall metal box from GW - it has a bunch of drawers and then a file box at the top - I put manuals up there. I just love it - I wish I had the money to buy the other one at the time.

    I keep a kit by each machine too - when I sell a machine I try to put a kit with it.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  10. #60
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
    Hahaha. Well my boyfriend gifted me for my a birthday a singer organizer that has room for several large spools of threads, little spools, pins, bobbins, etc. I managed to fit some other things in there and then I have a small makeup train case I picked up at goodwill for like 3 bucks with mY rotary cutters, more pins, needles and stuff like that. so far most of the machines have their own "goody bags" easily kept with the machine. I don't know whether to keep it like or get another box and label different compartments for each machine part.
    I keep a couple of different boxes. I have my sewing organizer that holds the "non-machine specific" things - thread, needles, etc. I have a tackle box that holds electrical things, bits of motors, wick, carbon disks, etc. Then there's an organizer that holds all the other parts - homeless feet, screws, bobbins, needle plates, cabinet parts and whatnots.

    Most of my machines also have a box beside them with their specific parts, like Miriam describes.

    It all totally depends on how your mind works. The best organization scheme is the one you will get behind and use.
    Mine is an ongoing project. I add or subtract machines and stuff, and things get rearranged. I sold 4 machines (and taught 2.5 people to sew!) this weekend, and now I'm rearranging again to get it efficient in my sewing room again.

    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    We should do a new whole thread on pics of our tool boxes some time... I picked up a big tall metal box from GW - it has a bunch of drawers and then a file box at the top - I put manuals up there. I just love it - I wish I had the money to buy the other one at the time.

    I keep a kit by each machine too - when I sell a machine I try to put a kit with it.
    Yeah! I could use some new tool ideas

  11. #61
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Been there, doing that now. I am making room to bring my HQ Sweet Sixteen in from the garage (AKA studio, LOL). It is becoming too cold out there to sew and quilt. What to you put into the "goody bag" Tammi? Most of my machines have come without their stuff. One thing I do is to keep a COPY of a manual in a zip lock bag with the machine, seal it and put under the needle and needle down to hold it. It is always there for reference.
    Sweet Caroline

  12. #62
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    If I have the manual, I provide it. If I can find it online, I usually will email it or a link to it to the buyer. When I first started collecting, I used to buy accessory boxes. I didn't realize how many I would end up with later on. I try to put together a kit close to what the original box was. I usually provide a few needles, some bobbins.... basically, you should be able to go home and sew with it, if you have thread. I'm also finding that I've been teaching people how to use every feature that the machines have, but I can't really package that...

  13. #63
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Ok small update on my mothers machine... the bobbin switch moves now! fairly easily ( a lot better then it did before anyways) however if i push it all the way to the left, where i assume its supposed to sit by default when its being wound, its still hard to push... but once i move it away from the edge it moves a lot smoother. Also i cant seem to get the stitch plate back on. it kind of "shot" off of the little metal bar that holds it in place and now i cant seem to get it on. i guess if i gently wedge something underneath and push the plate in it might catch again. I'll try oiling the moving bits again with some triflow now that i have it and see if that helps at all.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  14. #64
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    If I have the manual, I provide it. If I can find it online, I usually will email it or a link to it to the buyer. When I first started collecting, I used to buy accessory boxes. I didn't realize how many I would end up with later on. I try to put together a kit close to what the original box was. I usually provide a few needles, some bobbins.... basically, you should be able to go home and sew with it, if you have thread. I'm also finding that I've been teaching people how to use every feature that the machines have, but I can't really package that...
    I spent over an hour one time with a lady showing her all the bells and whistles on a 401 and she bought a Janome I had there - go figure. Didn't have to show her a thing. Her loss... LOL... I do the same I put together some sort of a kit. I'm always on the prowl for the quarter packs of pins, a stray tape measure, a stitch ripper a screwdriver, some bobbins, needles, small scissors, what have you. Some times I put in a magnet or a pin cushion. Some different feet. If I have a machine that is harder to sell an I put in a buttonholer or something. Yeah, go home and sew something. Why else would you buy one???
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  15. #65
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittywolf13 View Post
    Ok small update on my mothers machine... the bobbin switch moves now! fairly easily ( a lot better then it did before anyways) however if i push it all the way to the left, where i assume its supposed to sit by default when its being wound, its still hard to push... but once i move it away from the edge it moves a lot smoother. Also i cant seem to get the stitch plate back on. it kind of "shot" off of the little metal bar that holds it in place and now i cant seem to get it on. i guess if i gently wedge something underneath and push the plate in it might catch again. I'll try oiling the moving bits again with some triflow now that i have it and see if that helps at all.
    Good Job!! It might loosen up even more too. As long as it's completely into winding position (check at the bottom) I wouldn't worry too much. I suspect that it's hard to push because the collar is a little low on the shaft, but I don't really want you to move it unless it's actually a problem. It's a pain to position, and you must must must have the right hex key or it will strip the head.

    The stitch plate is counter intuitive. It slides on from the needle plate side of things, and you may have to lift each side of the spring into place with a tiny blade screw driver (another tool for your toolbox! )

    I bought then promptly lost the tri-flow in the car. Just found it tonight. I have a machine that I'm told is "clunking" and hasn't been used in 8 - 12 years. It'll get the tri-flow treatment tomorrow. The clunk though was the bobbin / hook area being assembled wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    I spent over an hour one time with a lady showing her all the bells and whistles on a 401 and she bought a Janome I had there - go figure. Didn't have to show her a thing. Her loss... LOL... I do the same I put together some sort of a kit. I'm always on the prowl for the quarter packs of pins, a stray tape measure, a stitch ripper a screwdriver, some bobbins, needles, small scissors, what have you. Some times I put in a magnet or a pin cushion. Some different feet. If I have a machine that is harder to sell an I put in a buttonholer or something. Yeah, go home and sew something. Why else would you buy one???
    LOL! nice! I usually make them pick first, then show them how to use it. I will tell them the differences, let them look and see what they want, usually make a recommendation, then once they choose, I'll go over the whole machine. I think I spent 1.5hours with the one lady yesterday, and 45 mins with the one before her. Saturday, I had to show a guy how a sewing machine worked. That's a different set of analogies I'll tell ya!

    The buttonholers are a good point. I've put one with each of the vintage machines I'm trying to sell, but I'm thinking of packaging a couple of the newer machines that have the 4 step buttonholers with the real buttonholers.

  16. #66
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    LOL! nice! I usually make them pick first, then show them how to use it. I will tell them the differences, let them look and see what they want, usually make a recommendation, then once they choose, I'll go over the whole machine. I think I spent 1.5hours with the one lady yesterday, and 45 mins with the one before her. Saturday, I had to show a guy how a sewing machine worked. That's a different set of analogies I'll tell ya! [/QUOTE]


    LOL She CALLED about a 401...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  17. #67
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    Hah! I hear that! I have an ad out there for a 457 and a 514. The funny part is I've sold 4 machines (including a 403) off those 2 ads, and those 2 machines are still here.

    I think the 401's can be a little intimidating to some people because of the piggy nose....

  18. #68
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Haven't had time to work on her anymore but I wanted to get some suggestions, in the event that I can't get her running what do you guys suggest I replace her with? (I probably won't toss the machine. Probably shelve it) my requirements are simple:

    Just straight stitch is fine (she never used the cams on her 758)
    Reverse
    and simple to thread/wind the bobbin. (she is apperantly bobbin challenged like me! Haha)
    Singer preferred simply because she wants to keep the cabinet. (but if you think it will fit then I'm game for other brands!)
    And no "plastic fantastic" :P

    Any suggestions?? Thanks in advance!
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  19. #69
    Super Member Gladys's Avatar
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    That's exactly like my Mom's. It needs some work though. So glad you found it and yes they are work horses.

  20. #70
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Find a Singer 403 - they are very simple - you can just use one or two cams. It is easy to see what you are doing. I have one and use it in preference to a herd of others.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  21. #71
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestion Miriam!
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  22. #72
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    I agree with Miriam. If you see a 503 too, it's pretty much the same machine.

  23. #73
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    I agree with Miriam. If you see a 503 too, it's pretty much the same machine.
    They are the same machine - just a different body - you might feel like Judy Jedson when you use it.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  24. #74
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    So tiny update. The other morning I poked the actuator and it actually moved really easily. I was kind of surprised. Guess leaving it sit worked! I need to put the slide plate on and see if that activates from bobbin winding mode to sewing mode. If it does I'm ready for some test stitches. wish I had more time to work on my machines. GuesS the holidays are rolling around so I can probably work with them then.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  25. #75
    cjr
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    I purchased a Singer 778, very similiar to your machine in 1976. I used it a lot at first then not so much while I worked. In 2009, I retired , took machine sewing Dr for refurbish, clean etc. Now my DH does it, saves me tons of money. This is a work horse machine. Since I've retired I use mine daily many times for 4-6 hrs. at a time. The main thing is to regularly oil and clean bobbin area every time you change bobbin. My only complaint is bobbin does not hold enough thread.
    www.etsy.com/shop/quiltinglycaroline

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