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Thread: Musings from the Miller ...... antique machines are better.

  1. #26
    FLQ
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    I've been a fan of vintage sewing machines for a while. When I wanted to learn to sew in 1959 my Mom gave me a featherweight. It was given away when I was dumb enough not to take it with me when I left home. I started quilting in 1999 and bought a replacement featherweight. Since then my husband bought me a Viking Lily and Saphire. I still sew on the featherweight too. Last week I decided to rescue two Japanese machines, a Wizard and a Morse Deluxe 200. The Morse is at the sewing machine hospital for a checkup, tuneup and whatever else the "doc" thinks is needed. I guess I'm a little OC on this vintage business. I can't wait to sew on these older machines

  2. #27
    Member Glory's Avatar
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    I am for the old sewing machines too. I quilt on a computerized Viking machine and this morning I pluged it in and it would not come on. If it was one of my older ones, I could fix it. I will have to take it to be repaired if possible. It is only 3 years old and I keep it cleaned out after I do my sewing. For now, I just got out my featherweight and finished my project. ( not a quilt) I can always count on it and my Singer 301 with a long bed. Love the past!!!!!! Gloria
    Gloria

  3. #28
    Junior Member Brynn's Avatar
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    I started with a Janome 7318, and never had a single problem with it that I didn't cause by tinkering. Then my parents bought me a FW for Christmas this past year--now I am hopelessly addicted. I troll Craigslist looking for machines in need of love, and finally gave in and picked up my 201 the other day. Heck, I'm even thinking of selling the Janome, since I won't need it for quilting and I hardly ever do any mending; it's much better to steal my boyfriend's ripped shirts for quilts!

  4. #29
    Senior Member MrsBoats's Avatar
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    Not only are the old machines better made (and meant to be user-serviceable!) but my big objection is that the new white plastic monstrosities have no soul. No color, no life, no pizzazz. And yes, it's a mark of time changing--remember salmon colored cars?--but the new ones are all so bland and boring. Most of us here can recognize a lot of the old ones by their shape, or decals, or color. You can't do that with the white plastic ones-they all look alike!
    -Karen
    There's no such thing as too many sewing machines!

  5. #30
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsBoats View Post
    Not only are the old machines better made (and meant to be user-serviceable!) but my big objection is that the new white plastic monstrosities have no soul. No color, no life, no pizzazz. And yes, it's a mark of time changing--remember salmon colored cars?--but the new ones are all so bland and boring. Most of us here can recognize a lot of the old ones by their shape, or decals, or color. You can't do that with the white plastic ones-they all look alike!
    Yeah!! Someone else finally said it! While reading this thread, my '65 Bug kept coming to mind. It is simple, basic and easy to work on. In many ways, it is like my treadle without the whole Fred Flintstone thing going on.
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  6. #31
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Oh boy, I had a 66 VW bug and you are so right about them. I am a firm believer in the KISS principle.

    Joe

  7. #32
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redbugsullivan View Post
    Yeah!! Someone else finally said it! While reading this thread, my '65 Bug kept coming to mind. It is simple, basic and easy to work on. In many ways, it is like my treadle without the whole Fred Flintstone thing going on.
    I like this.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  8. #33
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    With vintage machines, people actually looked at what they were doing when assembling them. Recently, my friend's Brother machine stopped working at a very bad time. She was making costumes for the school play which was 3 days away. In passing, she mentioned the fact she had to go sewing machine shopping after work!

    20 minutes later (thankfully I keep a good toolbox at work) I had cleaned out the feed dog area, reconnected a spring, and shifted 80% of the grease on to the gears. That's right. Most of what had been applied had not even been placed correctly. Now it runs better than it ever has! Workmanship...
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  9. #34
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    I used to have a 66 VW. That's when you could still do the work on them yourselves!

    Linda

    Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. I once was lost but now am found, was blind, but now I see.
    [John Newton (1725-1807)]

    http://sewextremeseams.blogspot.com/

  10. #35
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    Joe,

    A term that I have used for years to describe a heavy machine this is in a case is..... lug-able. (Snicker)

    Cathy



    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    There are two trains of thought I guess about "portable" machines.
    First, the original definition of "portable" means it's not in a cabinet, but still weighs the same as a full size 57 Chevy.
    Second, the modern definition of "portable" means it's light as breeze and you can carry it around in your back pack or purse.

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  11. #36
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Oh boy, I had a 66 VW bug and you are so right about them. I am a firm believer in the KISS principle.

    Joe
    my old VW bug got better mileage than my new Honda. Go figure.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  12. #37
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mizkaki View Post
    Joe,

    A term that I have used for years to describe a heavy machine this is in a case is..... lug-able. (Snicker)

    Cathy
    Cathy,
    That is so true. You don't carry 'em, you lug 'em around.

    Joe

  13. #38
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    my old VW bug got better mileage than my new Honda. Go figure.
    It's been sooooooo many summers since I had my 66 I've forgotten if I even took a gas milage test. Back then gas wasn't so expensive so you filled up and drove.
    The old bugs had no emissions, no electronics, no computers, no catalytic converters, nothing but simplicity.

    I'm thinking maybe I should sell all my stuff, buy a bug and go on a road trip. Beep beep.

    Joe

  14. #39
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    Joe,

    Beep! Beep! (that's me passing you on my road trip.)

    Cathy




    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    It's been sooooooo many summers since I had my 66 I've forgotten if I even took a gas milage test. Back then gas wasn't so expensive so you filled up and drove.
    The old bugs had no emissions, no electronics, no computers, no catalytic converters, nothing but simplicity.

    I'm thinking maybe I should sell all my stuff, buy a bug and go on a road trip. Beep beep.

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  15. #40
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Ha, ha, make mine one of those old camper vans and I'm ready for a road trip with camping in the Walmart parking lot. All except the one we stopped at in TN one time - too many shoot outs - way too close...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.
    good mothers let you lick the beaters - great mothers turn it off first

  16. #41
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    Hey Joe, I read a post about a singer 4622 you have.If you still own it,would you sell it ? L.W.

  17. #42
    Junior Member makitmama's Avatar
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    OK, I hereby confess that I have a new Bernina 8 series machine. The one that has an 11 1/2 inch harp and is referred to as a 'sewing computer'. It is nice to sew quilts on because it secures the thread at beginning and end, and then cuts the thread for me. The tension on it is wonderful. And the store had a cutaway machine, and guess what- it is all metal under the plastic.
    With that said, I swap freely depending on what I am doing. Right now all sewing is being done on a Pfaff 130(as I am doing leather). Heavy quilts get done on either the 201 or Morse IV depending on if I need more than straight stitch. I have a stack of others that are awaiting repair or repaint.
    I am 54 but love a lot of things that are older than I am- Sinatra for instance. I see the vintage machines as having a wealth of experience they can whisper to me.
    Cil



    I'm a Queen.... at least my pantyhose say I am!


    (proud caretaker of a magenta 221, purple 222, assorted 66's, a 301, a pink Atlas and Monarch, and Granny's 201-2.

  18. #43
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    I am so laughing at this thread! I understand where you are coming from! I have a Janome 10001 and only use it for embroidery. For sewing and quilting, I use my 15-91, my 66 or my 27 treadle. I have a new Volkswagen CC Sport. I drive it to church and to the grocery store. For my fun driving, I have a 78 VW bug convertible (Champagne Edition). My DGD went on a youth trip and when they got home, I picked her up in Matilda II (the bug). She was humiliated. She said I was becoming eccentric. She said driving a 34 year old convertible, wearing a big ole green sun hat, and having 2 dogs in the back seat in their car seats was eccentric. I told her that I didn't think so--only one of the dogs had on sun glasses. The other one just had on a hat. What's becoming of our kids today?????

  19. #44
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    My first car was an old '65 VW squareback, nicknamed the Tomato Soup Can. The floor was rotted out, headlight rims falling off, sunroof frequently stuck partly open, no heat, etc. I Loved that thing! I learned a lot about servicing it myself- timing, gapping the plugs, running jump start. To me it was beautiful. About 3 years ago I started collecting some treadles and FWs and have done some basic maintenance on them. I greatly appreciate the knowledge shared so freely on this Board. I have a lightweight Brother plastic machine for carrying to sew ins, but at home I use my '76 Kenmore or other machine. No balking at heavy seams, hissy fit about mild lint buildup, or bouncing across the table. I appreciate a simple machine that was made to last. I don't have time to sew a lot, so I don't have patience with a fussy machine. Antique or vintage machines are beautiful to me. I Love the gold decals, and colored machines that look like vintage 2 tone Chevys. White plastic says "cheap" and "fragile".

  20. #45
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.W. View Post
    Hey Joe, I read a post about a singer 4622 you have.If you still own it,would you sell it ? L.W.
    L.W.,

    Yes we still have it. However my wife has taken a liking to the multitude of stretch patterns on it so we'll be keeping it.

    Joe

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