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Thread: My other great grandmas singer

  1. #1
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    My other great grandmas singer

    It is missing the bobbin cover and is rusty...and I have no attachments for it. I am going to have to try to find a serial number. Not sure where to find it yet. Name:  17968385_10155252698288466_1576033508_o.jpg
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  2. #2
    Senior Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
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    This one is either a 66-1 or a 66-4 Singer with Red Head decals. It could use back clamp feet or low shank feet.
    The decals look to be in pretty good shape.

    The serial number is located where the red arrow is, and probably starts with "G" I would put some sewing machine oil on a terry cloth and rubbing just the brass plate or maybe just oil it and let it sit before wiping off.

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    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.

    You can get a replacement plate at http://shop.sew-classic.com/Slide-Pl...-192-32569.htm and if no manual you can find one at http://www.singerco.com/support/instruction-manuals Just put 66 in the search box and I think they might have a few one of which might be 66-1. Any of the 66 manuals will show how to install the bobbin cover.
    Last edited by OurWorkbench; 04-15-2017 at 08:24 AM.
    Janey & John

  3. #3
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    I just went to look, the plate looks like it is totally gone. All rusted away and nothing is there. Could it have been removed or is it stamped in the machine in one piece? I wish it was still there. I will go look more. Thanks for the tips on where to get the parts and what it is. Would you guess about 1915 or so?
    Last edited by jlamere; 04-15-2017 at 08:45 AM.

  4. #4
    Super Member Cari-in-Oly's Avatar
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    There is no brass plate. Singer stamped the serial # onto a flat spot right there.

    Cari

  5. #5
    Senior Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
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    Cari, thanks. I forgot. Some that I have worked on seemed to have kind of a brass finish.

    You may be surprised, but indeed it does look pretty rusted. If you can, maybe some 0000 steel wool and sewing machine oil over the area might bring out some of the numbers. I'd still be tempted to let some oil sit on it for a while.

    My 1912 66 had/has a different hand wheel and the low shank foot. I don't think that it originally had those. According to ISMACS the decals were used from 1902 to 1923. Also, ISMACS seem to indicate that the low shank started in 1923. Without the actual serial number, it could be anywhere in that time frame. I'm guessing that many may have come with the back clamp had the presser bar switched to accept the more prevalent low shank. I'm also not sure when the machines started to have the motor boss became standard.

    At least yours still has the original hand wheel.

    I'm not sure if you have read about using Tri-Flow, but it is highly recommended. I usually start out with regular sewing machine oil. I progress to Tri-Flow if I have a troublesome spot.

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  6. #6
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    The 66 was introduced in 1900 I think, and yours could very well be 1915 by the looks of it. I think they stopped making the more elaborate decals some time in the 1920s. There serial number is usually embossed in the metal, when dirt and rust come off there's often enough left to identify the numbers. Be carefull, when scraping off the rust; this part once had a layer of transparent shellac too. If you have a tub of Quick-Glo it does a good job on this type of rust, it's gritty enough to scrub it off, at least partially.

    I hope you will post pictures after cleaning and oiling too :- )

  7. #7
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    Thank you all! I will let it soak and maybe find some quick-Glo and I will read up on Tri-Flow. I rubbed it a little with a cotton ball with oil on it. I think I could see a few numbers on the right side, I had my daughter look and she just said nothing there...maybe it was my imagination. Thanks again! I hope my husband does not get jealous!

  8. #8
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    Quick-Glo is a good polish and cleaner for metal. I used it to polish up needle and presser bars, chromed plates should clean up nicely. It removes rust better than the average polish, but steel wool with soap will get you there too and no need to go buy it if you happen to have some thing similar.

    I don't think there's much advantage to soaking the spot in oil since a bit of scouring and hard rubbing is much speedier and needed to polish it up any way. There is stuff like evapo-rust but again, only if you already already have it. I'm just going on and on about the very basic stuff, but rust is this odd thing, very porous and loose compared to the intact steel and cast iron parts. Oil losens the rust and when joints, hinges and moving parts loosen up, it gradually flushes out. It can take days and weeks for rusty parts to run smoothly again, but they will. Your machine looks nice though, just in need of a good cleaning and a touch up of the finish here and there :- )

  9. #9
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    Thank you! I appreciate the help and encouragement!!

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    I am also glad that I don't have to buy expensive needles, right? haha!

  11. #11
    Senior Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlamere View Post
    I am also glad that I don't have to buy expensive needles, right? haha!
    At least for this one, the needles are readily available.

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

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    This one is rusted and will hardly move a 1/4 of an inch.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlamere View Post
    This one is rusted and will hardly move a 1/4 of an inch.

    Don't worry; have the machine on a table in a heated room; detect all oil points and apply oil generously. Deliberately over oil a bit and expect excess to dribble down; it's a good idea to keep a few layers of kitchen towels under the base to catch the spill. Take the bobbin case out by lifting the lever up and towards you; apply oil. There several oil points on top of the machine, behind the faceplate and under the base of the machine. Turn the stitch length knob in and out a few times while you add some oil to the threading. Let it seep in over night, and repeat it all the next day. You might have to take the hand wheel off to clean and oil there. Here's a bit of help if you need to take it off.

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    I got it to turn, now I only have the presser foot stuck. It won't move but the lever is loose and moves...I am not sure about that.

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    You have to work on the presser foot bar from behind the face plate. There is an oil point in the shaft (black part of the body) where it moves up and down that ofte get stuck. Unscrew the presser foot tension screw on top of the machine; be careful not to loose the small washer on top of the spring, work a bit of oil down there to and in the threadings. Any grime and rust that migth be down there will loosen and in the next few days all parts could benefit from a good cleaning.

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    When you get this baby cleaned up and working your grandma will be so proud of you!!

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    Is the serial number anywhere else on the machine? Thanks! My daughter helped me and we got it all loose now and we are pretty excited. I only have one presser foot and it is rusty, so now I will go look for a few or just one! I also have to figure out how to get the bobbin area opened up and cleaned! Thanks for the tips and help. I really thought it was beyond help. I am kinda bummed about the serial number being all rusted out.

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    Have you found The Archaic Arcaine blog? She has several great tutorials and lots of info on these old machines. Here's a post on how to clean model 66 case. I think the 66 and 99 are almost identical in this way, and it's not a good idea to loosen the screw in center there, unless you have read the service manual and are prepared to fuzz a lot with bobbin tension and adjustment of hook and race. If parts are very rusty I guess they have to come out to be treated and polished, but when the bobbin case is out there's usually enough space to clean out most rust and grime.

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    No, I have not found that blog! Thanks!

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    Regarding dirty machines with a bit of rust here and there you have to make sure the machine get's oiled and used daily or as often as possible in the beginning. Grime and rust gradually dissolves, but it's an ongoing process the first week or so. The machine will only get smother and better, and model 66 is well worth it. In my experience it takes two weeks before I am happy with it; by then I have had several rounds of oiling and cleaning, scraping out grime and rust from all the nooks and crannies in the needle bar, joints, hinges, knobs,... They often shine up further with a resin based car polish. I use a metal polish on the needle and presser bar; they shine up like new. All this diligent oiling, turning the mechanism, wiping off, and more oil are to prevent the rust and grime to settle again; it easily does until it's finally flushed out.

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    This is my bobbin case, how do I get it opened up? I tried to look at the link and it looks like the set up is a little different, the thing on mine is short, and it will not move like they did it in the photo or a video I looked at. I also looked at another link to remove the feed dog. I undid the screw but it did not fall our or I couldn't really see how to get it out. I was scared I would not be able to get it back together, so I put the screw back in.


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    The thing that has the screw in it that you are not supposed to mess with is shorter in mine machine.
    Last edited by jlamere; 04-27-2017 at 05:11 PM.

  23. #23
    Senior Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlamere View Post
    The thing that has the screw in it that you are not supposed to mess with is shorter in mine machine.
    Yours is different from the link. I joined some Yahoo groups back in 2010 when I refurbished my sister's 66-1. I found out that you must take out that screw to remove bracket and/or the bobbin case. I made several CDs of the pictures I took when I did that machine. I haven't found the pictures taken during the process, but I did find the before and after pictures.

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    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

  24. #24
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    I looked it up, and it looks like the early type 66 needs the positioning bracket to come off with the bobbin case. If I understand this correctly the early version doesn't have the adjustment option like the 99 does and later 66 and should be less trouble to put back together. Model 66 and 99 aren't completely identical, but pretty close. If it should turn out other wise the worst senario is an hour or so spent on adjusting for enough space for the hook and thread to pass around while it still runs smoothly and quietly (less clicking from the bobbin case).

    Very interesting to get to know all these details :- ) On the pluss side, your machine doesn't look like it's rusty, just a bit grimy.
    Last edited by Mickey2; 04-28-2017 at 03:48 AM.

  25. #25
    Senior Member OurWorkbench's Avatar
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    I found some of the 'process' pictures.

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    and another one of clean and back together

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    Have you downloaded the pdfs from http://web.archive.org/web/201610160...achine_manual/ ??

    The one about the bobbin area shows the 'newer' one like the link you posted. It also shows how to put a wick in to keep the bobbin case oiled. I think my sister's was missing the spring type holder for the wick. I see you have that piece.

    Make sure you use penetrating oil to get the screw out. Patience is in order.

    Another of the TFSR pdfs is the underside and there are rollers on the underside that need to be cleaned and oiled well, so that they roll and not just slide.

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Janey & John

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