Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: question about a singer 66 red eye?

  1. #1
    Junior Member krista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    236

    question about a singer 66 red eye?

    I now a lady who has a beautiful 66 redeye for sale for $60.00. It is in excellent working order except it needs a presser foot. Are they easy to get? She says they are. I am new to quilting and was also wondering if it is a good machine to quilt on? If anyone could give me some feedback that would be great. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW (I wish it was the Ozarks!)
    Posts
    6,509
    Blog Entries
    6
    Krista, it depends! The backclamping attachments can be hard to find, but if the presser bar has been changed out, then yes, any short shank presser foot would work.
    Is the machine a treadle, handcrank, or has it been electrified?
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    Junior Member krista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    236
    It's a treadle. Other than that I have no idea. I am going to look at it on Thurs. since she lives out by my inlaws(1 hour 45 min. away).




    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee View Post
    Krista, it depends! The backclamping attachments can be hard to find, but if the presser bar has been changed out, then yes, any short shank presser foot would work.
    Is the machine a treadle, handcrank, or has it been electrified?

  4. #4
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    14,881
    If the machine is in good shape and in a cabinet, $60.00 is a good price even without a presser foot. They are not difficult to find. Make sure it does have the presser foot attaching part. If it doesn't, before you buy, check on E-Bay for parts available for the machine. The Singer Red Eye is a good treadle machine. Also make sure the wheel turns easily.
    Last edited by twinkie; 11-20-2011 at 04:39 AM.

  5. #5
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    14,881
    Forgot to mention this site that we use to locate attachments for vintage machines. We have had good luck with the site. http://www.april1930s.com/html/quilt....html#LowShank

  6. #6
    Super Member lovelyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    2,103
    Blog Entries
    6
    Two places for vintage presser feet:
    Guy Baker - great to deal with! http://www.sewingmachineparts.net He will gladly talk to you on the phone. Has a lot of hard to find stuff.
    The Sew Box - http://www.thesewbox.com This is Charlene Phillip's website - she is the author of "The Sewing Machine Attachment Book". Also willing to talk to you on the phone. I found out by talking to her that she lives on about 15 min. from me!
    Linda
    There may be times we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest. - Elie Wiesel

  7. #7
    Junior Member krista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    236
    It doesn't come with the cabinet. She uses the wheel by hand. Thanks.


    Quote Originally Posted by twinkie View Post
    If the machine is in good shape and in a cabinet, $60.00 is a good price even without a presser foot. They are not difficult to find. Make sure it does have the presser foot attaching part. If it doesn't, before you buy, check on E-Bay for parts available for the machine. The Singer Red Eye is a good treadle machine. Also make sure the wheel turns easily.

  8. #8
    Senior Member sew_southern's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    871
    I just bought the same model, 66 red eye, yesterday at an estate sale for $40. It has the treadle cabinet with it, but both the cabinet & machine need to be cleaned good and there are minor repairs needed. I've spent a little time online looking up the year of mine, which is 1919. Some prices I've found online for this model can be as much as $400, maybe more depends on the condition. If yours doesn't have a treadle it may be difficult to sew with one hand and turn the wheel at the same time with other hand. Just my thinking on it. Let us know what you decide.
    ...the importance of one's life lies not in money or celebrity, but in doing the right thing, even in silence or secrecy, and without reward... Fergus M. Bordewich

  9. #9
    Super Member lovelyl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    2,103
    Blog Entries
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by sew_southern View Post
    I just bought the same model, 66 red eye, yesterday at an estate sale for $40. It has the treadle cabinet with it, but both the cabinet & machine need to be cleaned good and there are minor repairs needed. I've spent a little time online looking up the year of mine, which is 1919. Some prices I've found online for this model can be as much as $400, maybe more depends on the condition. If yours doesn't have a treadle it may be difficult to sew with one hand and turn the wheel at the same time with other hand. Just my thinking on it. Let us know what you decide.
    I have a 201 handcrank and thought it would be difficult to sew on, but was pleasantly surprised! The fabric goes through so straight that you only need one hand to guide it. Have used it to make a quilted purse and loved using the handcrank. The price for the 66 might be a little high, but they are great machines - I have a 66 treadle.
    Linda
    There may be times we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest. - Elie Wiesel

  10. #10
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW (I wish it was the Ozarks!)
    Posts
    6,509
    Blog Entries
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by krista View Post
    It doesn't come with the cabinet. She uses the wheel by hand. Thanks.
    If the machine is in a cabinet that you run the machine with a foot pedal it's a treadle. If you operate the machine with a knob attached to the handwheel, it's a handcrank. (bit of trivia, the only difference between a 66-1 and a 66-3 is that the 66-1 is in a treadle cabinet, the 66-3 is "portable" and is a handcrank.) If the machine is in a cabinet, and she's only selling the machine head, you're going to need a base of some kind.

    None of us answered one of your first questions... the 66's are wonderful machines for piecing, whether it's treadle or handcrank. Glenn FMQs with his 66 treadle. I think that to actually quilt with a handcrank would be difficult, I haven't tried it with mine.
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  11. #11
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    So. Fla now, Va orig
    Posts
    1,567
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee View Post
    Krista, it depends! The backclamping attachments can be hard to find, but if the presser bar has been changed out, then yes, any short shank presser foot would work.
    Is the machine a treadle, handcrank, or has it been electrified?
    Go for it the back clamping attachments are all over ebay, I have several sets I would be happy to sell you.
    pat design

  12. #12
    Junior Member krista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    236
    I contacted a guy from Illinois that was recommended from this site and he said not to worry he could get the parts. I also found a singer treadle stand that has been refurbished and is beautiful. When I get both on Fri. I will post pics! Thanks everyone for your help and suggestions!

    Quote Originally Posted by patdesign View Post
    Go for it the back clamping attachments are all over ebay, I have several sets I would be happy to sell you.

  13. #13
    Junior Member krista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    central NY
    Posts
    236
    here are pictures of the redeye that I purchased. It is in excellent working order. I only paid $35. She gave me the cabinet for free. I had mentioned that I was looking for a cabinet and she said she acquired one and told me I could have it. I love it! Thank you for all your advise. Now I just have to get used to using it!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Senior Member Bennett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North TX
    Posts
    761
    Not bad at all to get both for $35. Beautiful decals on that one, and the metal parts should clean up well.
    I have a screw driver and YouTube--I can fix it!

  15. #15
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Frederick, OK
    Posts
    2,050

    Singer 66 Comparison

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee View Post
    ... (bit of trivia, the only difference between a 66-1 and a 66-3 is that the 66-1 is in a treadle cabinet, the 66-3 is "portable" and is a handcrank.)


    Let me add a little to that Charlee.

    The early 66-1 machines were treadle-only. It wasn’t until around 1914 that the casting was changed to include a “hand crank boss” for attachment of the common Singer Hand Crank being mounted on other portable models dating back years earlier. That made the 66-3 possible, and then all machines made could go out either as a 66-1 in a treadle or a 66-3 portable with a hand crank. This attachment boss is normally called a “motor boss” now that we’re well past electrification days, and with the motor brackets having been designed to attach on the same fitting.

    The hand wheel and bobbin winder was also upgraded at that time, since the early bobbin winders were driven by the treadle belt, which was not possible on a portable machine. The later bobbin winder was outfitted with a rubber “tire” and was driven on the shoulder of the hand wheel. An obvious difference between the two models is the hand wheel spoke count. Early ones have 6 spokes and the later ones have 9 spokes.

    The presser bar change (from back clamp to side clamp) occurred sometime around 1923 as far as I can tell. The Red Eye decal is reported to have been used up until 1925, so it’s probable that some Red Eye machines came out originally with side-mount presser feet, although many earlier models were retro-fitted with side-mount bars by sewing machine shops, especially during the time when electrification was taking place, to take advantage of a larger selection of attachments.

    In this photo, the one on the left is a 1912 model, and the one on the right is a 1923 model.

    CD in Oklahoma
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

  16. #16
    Super Member LoisM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Highland, CA
    Posts
    1,403
    Quote Originally Posted by krista View Post
    here are pictures of the redeye that I purchased. It is in excellent working order. I only paid $35. She gave me the cabinet for free. I had mentioned that I was looking for a cabinet and she said she acquired one and told me I could have it. I love it! Thank you for all your advise. Now I just have to get used to using it!
    A year plus late on joining this thread but just had to say.... O.M.G! What a great find. You were so fortunately get the cabinet and machine for $35. Do you have any updated photos of the machine after her metal was cleaned, etc.?

  17. #17
    Super Member LoisM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Highland, CA
    Posts
    1,403
    Quote Originally Posted by ThayerRags View Post

    Let me add a little to that Charlee.

    The early 66-1 machines were treadle-only. It wasn’t until around 1914 that the casting was changed to include a “hand crank boss” for attachment of the common Singer Hand Crank being mounted on other portable models dating back years earlier. That made the 66-3 possible, and then all machines made could go out either as a 66-1 in a treadle or a 66-3 portable with a hand crank. This attachment boss is normally called a “motor boss” now that we’re well past electrification days, and with the motor brackets having been designed to attach on the same fitting.

    The hand wheel and bobbin winder was also upgraded at that time, since the early bobbin winders were driven by the treadle belt, which was not possible on a portable machine. The later bobbin winder was outfitted with a rubber “tire” and was driven on the shoulder of the hand wheel. An obvious difference between the two models is the hand wheel spoke count. Early ones have 6 spokes and the later ones have 9 spokes.

    The presser bar change (from back clamp to side clamp) occurred sometime around 1923 as far as I can tell. The Red Eye decal is reported to have been used up until 1925, so it’s probable that some Red Eye machines came out originally with side-mount presser feet, although many earlier models were retro-fitted with side-mount bars by sewing machine shops, especially during the time when electrification was taking place, to take advantage of a larger selection of attachments.

    In this photo, the one on the left is a 1912 model, and the one on the right is a 1923 model.

    CD in Oklahoma
    Wonderful information for those of us still shopping around. Thank you.

  18. #18
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,105
    CD,

    So, it would be safe to say that my 1919 vintage 66-? treadle machine, which now has a low shank presser foot shaft, left the factory as a back clamp machine and was later converted.

    Currently I have three red eyes: a 1913 vintage 66-1 that still has it's back clamp presser foot shaft, and the motor boss, a 1919 66-? that's probably been converted to low shank and a 1924 66-? that also has a low shank presser foot bar.

    How can I, or can I tell for sure which type of presser foot shaft the machine came with?

    Joe

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.