Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 32 of 32

Thread: Redeye that won't budge

  1. #26
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    Kerosene is basically a light fuel oil. It is not a solvent per sea but will clean away other dried oils and residue rather quickly.
    I used it to clean the 100 years of varnished oil off the bottom of my Minnesota A and to give my rusted up 99K his final flush out bath before reassembly.
    Neither machine's finish was damaged. I did not leave the kerosene on the finish any longer than necessary and I didn't completely immerse the machine in it.

    I have also used Hoppe's #9 gun cleaning solvent to clean really badly gunked up parts and there was no finish damage. Hoppe's #9 uses kerosene as a base with a few other ingredients added.

    I suspect that long time immersion in kerosene would not be good for decals, shellack or some paints, but a light cleaning shouldn't hurt. After all, it's oil, just not as refined as sewing machine oil.

    Joe

  2. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1

    Machine won't budge

    I've read with interest the ways to loosen a seized machine and thought I'd share what I did. I had an inherited morse 200 completely seized, locked up tight. I read online to use a hair dryer and I turned the machine on the side, blew the hot air into the head and continued to "wiggle" and that did the trick! It's now been oiled, cleaned and runs great. I cleaned the exterior with Murphy's oil soap with no ill effects. It didn't have decals to worry about per se, but I didn't want to mar the beautiful blue finish it has.

    Achy

    Quote Originally Posted by Bitzy One View Post
    I bought the locked up Redeye 2 weeks ago, I've gotten everything to come lose by getting the rust out/off and oiling like heck. The only thing that doesn't move is the needle bar to sew (which this part is INSIDE the head of the machine)!! When I turn the wheel it won't move. I've taken everything else apart to clean & oil per Muv's instruction video, BTW, thanks so much Muv!

    How do I get the guts out/exposed so I can get to it to break loose? I know that's all it needs, cause the foot lever wouldn't move either and I oiled & cleaned and kept oiling. Finally I pushed really hard on the top of it and it popped loose. Any HELP will be welcomed...

  3. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    515
    So, if I have an opportunity to get a 'red eye' in a cabinet - not sure if it is working - for fifty bucks, i should take it?

    Is it just the decal that makes it special?

    thanks!
    Lara

  4. #29
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    Lara122,

    If the machine is in good working order, and the cabinet is also in good condition $50.00 isn't too much. The more accessories and attachments that come with it the better.

    The red eye model 66 is no different mechanically than any other model 66 of similar vintage. But it is a well liked design and it was only made up until 1927 I think. So although it's not super rare, it's not super common either.

    I have two, both treadles. I'd gladly adopt another if it comes along.

    Joe

  5. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    515
    Joe, you are such a smarticulous! ;0)

    Being treadle only, is that practical to use to actually sew on? Would it be better to look for an electrified version? I do like the idea of being able to learn how to take care of it myself. My five or six year old kenmore from sears has begun to slip stitches occasionally. I use my seventies era Kenmore for piecing. I wouldn't know how in the world to 'work' on my plastic lightie!

    I like the idea of having something so old and classic, but I would need to be able to *use* it. Clearly, our grandmothers did fine with a treadle, but . . . .

    btw, the guy hasn't answered back about letting me come look at it.

    I saw a red eye that seems to have sold for $650! of course, it looked deliciously perfect . . . . . lol!!

    hmmm.

  6. #31
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Frederick, OK
    Posts
    2,050
    I believe that the model 66 was Singer's Semicentennial (50 years - Golden Anniversary) machine, even though it didn't start production on the 50th year, but a year later instead. (That's ok. I've missed a deadline or two myself over the years.)

    I've had several model 66 machines, but I'm still waiting to stumble onto my first Lotus.

    CD in Oklahoma
    Last edited by ThayerRags; 08-12-2012 at 06:06 AM.
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

  7. #32
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    Quote Originally Posted by Lara122 View Post
    Joe, you are such a smarticulous! ;0)

    Being treadle only, is that practical to use to actually sew on? Would it be better to look for an electrified version? I do like the idea of being able to learn how to take care of it myself. My five or six year old kenmore from sears has begun to slip stitches occasionally. I use my seventies era Kenmore for piecing. I wouldn't know how in the world to 'work' on my plastic lightie!

    I like the idea of having something so old and classic, but I would need to be able to *use* it. Clearly, our grandmothers did fine with a treadle, but . . . .

    btw, the guy hasn't answered back about letting me come look at it.

    I saw a red eye that seems to have sold for $650! of course, it looked deliciously perfect . . . . . lol!!

    hmmm.

    "Smarticulous" Wow! Wait till I show my wife. She'll never get over that. I might not either

    Treadles are very practical to use. They are just people powered rather than electric. I have 4 currently in their cabinets and functional. I have one other Singer waiting while I fix it's cabinet and a Minnesota A that has no home.

    I use them all from time to time.

    The only thing is you have to master treadling with your feet as you manipulate the machines controls with your hands. Once you get the "feel" to the machine you can stitch right along.

    Oh and most treadles when properly adjusted and lubed are quieter than e-machines.

    Well, about all you can do with the plastic one is take the needle plate and bobbin carrier out and clean it. More than likely it's filled up with lint and crap and that will cause trouble.
    That needs to be done with all machines from time to time actually. Just ask Miriam.

    Joe

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.