Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 32 of 32

Thread: Should I overhaul my Singer 401A or purchase a Janome 2012?

  1. #26
    Senior Member pheasantduster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    414
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigigigina View Post
    Thank you everyone for your replies. My daughter came over this weekend with an old "Crock Watcher" (precursor to the Crock Pot I guess) she inherited from her aunt. It is from the 70's and still cooks like a champ...not too hot like a lot of the newer, light-bottomed pots of today. Looking at the way her unit is built tipped the scales in favor of keeping my Singer 401a...The old adage..."They don't build them like they used to" is so true...I think the Singer has many years of great service left and if there is something it can't do...well, I guess I can go try my daughter's new machine.
    Good for you - so many things we have to replace (refrig, furniture, clothes) often are "built like they used to". Enjoy many future hours with your 401A
    Live well, Laugh often, Love much

  2. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Harrisburg, OR
    Posts
    444
    I'm in the Eugene area...let me know if I can be of any help. There have also been ads on cl recently for someone cleaning and selling vintage machines in the Eugene/Florence area. They will do a clean up for $30. Someone else posted a response to their ad that they were very happy with the service they received. I think you're smart to get your 401 going whether you buy a new machine or not.

  3. #28
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,795
    Quote Originally Posted by k9dancer View Post
    3. We who work on machines have not seen this one. Is it possible there is an issue you have missed?
    If you mean we haven't seen the machine in person, or a photo, agreed.
    My initial interpretation of this comment was that the people on the board that fix machines are not familiar with it. Not so.

    I can also post a how to on how to disassemble and adjust the needle tensioner back to factory specs. That may fix your tension issues. Otherwise, somewhere here I posted how to disassemble and clean the bobbin case spring. It was for a featherweight, but the principle is the same. That's all (and probably more than) a lot of the repair shops would do. It's standard when I service, because I don't want to see the machine back, but I know one repair shop that bragged to me that they spend 10-15 mins on a service. I don't think that's something to be proud of personally.

  4. #29
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,409
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    If you mean we haven't seen the machine in person, or a photo, agreed.
    My initial interpretation of this comment was that the people on the board that fix machines are not familiar with it. Not so.

    I can also post a how to on how to disassemble and adjust the needle tensioner back to factory specs. That may fix your tension issues. Otherwise, somewhere here I posted how to disassemble and clean the bobbin case spring. It was for a featherweight, but the principle is the same. That's all (and probably more than) a lot of the repair shops would do. It's standard when I service, because I don't want to see the machine back, but I know one repair shop that bragged to me that they spend 10-15 mins on a service. I don't think that's something to be proud of personally.
    I agree. But, why write it all out every time someone comes up with a mere tension problem. It is all in that wonderful manual that everyone has posted a million times on here. The manual has gone over the various types of tension - once you have taken a few a part and put it back together it can nearly be done in your sleep.. What is scary, most repair men are TRAINED to just REPLACE the tension with a brand new one rather than clean, properly reassemble and adjust your old tension. I just had one yesterday - I betcha someone got rid of a machine because someone spooned the disks when they reassembled the tension. The instructions putting a tension back together are sometimes in the owner's manual. Not as good as that repair manual but I managed it when I was about 18. I wish I had known where the tension spring was suppose to position.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  5. #30
    Super Member oldtnquiltinglady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Lafayette, TN
    Posts
    1,199
    Blog Entries
    9
    Miriam, I love your "favorite quote" Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry, and have used it a time or two myself lately when carrying on a conversation in my sewing room......just a note in passing here. And to get back to the subject at hand, fix the 401, and if you have the money to spend, tell DH you want the new one for Christmas, and then let us know next year sometime which one you like better.
    Make every day count for something!

    JoAnn

  6. #31
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,409
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by oldtnquiltinglady View Post
    Miriam, I love your "favorite quote" Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry, and have used it a time or two myself lately when carrying on a conversation in my sewing room......just a note in passing here. And to get back to the subject at hand, fix the 401, and if you have the money to spend, tell DH you want the new one for Christmas, and then let us know next year sometime which one you like better.
    yeah and I will be here taking bets...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  7. #32
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,795
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    I agree. But, why write it all out every time someone comes up with a mere tension problem. It is all in that wonderful manual that everyone has posted a million times on here. The manual has gone over the various types of tension - once you have taken a few a part and put it back together it can nearly be done in your sleep.. What is scary, most repair men are TRAINED to just REPLACE the tension with a brand new one rather than clean, properly reassemble and adjust your old tension. I just had one yesterday - I betcha someone got rid of a machine because someone spooned the disks when they reassembled the tension. The instructions putting a tension back together are sometimes in the owner's manual. Not as good as that repair manual but I managed it when I was about 18. I wish I had known where the tension spring was suppose to position.
    Naw,.. copy and paste. Which manual are you talking about? The one from TFSR? Or is there another one I've missed? I sometimes will post a how to, only because the methods in the manual can be unclear, or sometimes more complex than they need to be (like removing the bobbin case on a 201 for instance.)

    I totally believe what you say about the repairmen. In IT (where I work during the "day"), one of the major certifications teaches people to replace the mainboard and reinstall windows. No troubleshooting. Same exact thing.
    It's what's fast, makes them the most money, and is the most idiot proof. That way, "even a monkey" can be trained to do it. Not a lot of craftsmen in any industry anymore, I've noticed. It's unfortunate.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.