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Singer Golden Touch and Sew 750

Singer Golden Touch and Sew 750

Old 01-16-2022, 12:32 PM
  #1  
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Default Singer Golden Touch and Sew 750

I was wandering this forum a few days ago and came across a thread that thoroughly dissed the 750 and it kinda hurt my feelings to see my old war horse being put down that way. Stewed over it a bit and finally decided to post my own feelings about the 750, which are totally opposite.

I bought my 750 in the early 70s if memory serves. Necessity being the mother of invention and all, I started out making baby clothes for both my kids on it. I sewed for them up until they started school, which was the first time I could afford store-bought for them, Twenty years later I made my daughter's wedding gown on it along with dresses for her maid of honor and her flower girl. A couple of years later I did a 25+ yard satin Southern Belle gown for my son's bride plus all her attendants' gowns. Fast forward to this summer and I made gowns for my granddaughters to wear for their brother's wedding. I just finished a quilt for my great-grandson. Three generations later and my 750 is still going strong!

I don't understand all the bad feelings for this fantastic machine. I wore out a foot pedal back in the 90s, but that's the only work it's ever needed. I have more trouble finding good thread than I've ever had with my "Goldie". Does anybody know where to find the Coats and Clark Dual Duty Plus--the cotton wrapped polyester thread? I really prefer it to the plain polyester stuff that seems to be all I can find lately and my stash is starting to run low. I use white and black mostly,

Anyhow, that's my story. I have the 750 and a newer Singer 5050. They and a Brother my mom gave me back in the 60s are the only machines I've ever owned, and my grandmother's ancient black Singer from the 30s is what I learned to sew on.



Rusty
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Old 01-16-2022, 02:29 PM
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I didn't read the thread you're referencing, but I think for a lot of "vintage" machine people the problem with later Touch&Sews, meaning those with the plastic/rubber gears, is working on them, i.e. replacing the gears when they lose teeth. I've had a few T&Ss, I have a 714 right now and it sews like a champ, but when I've had to replace the gears on others I found it problematic. I don't remember the exact model, but I ordered new gears, replaced a few of them, but there was one I couldn't get to, checked a youtube video and when the person broke out the Dremel with the cutting disc to remove a metal tab that was "in the way" of replacing the remaining gear, I said, "Forget it."

They seem to have been made with "planned replacement" in mind, which is worse than planned obsolescence. This is emphasized even more when a person picks up a hundred or more year old machine and often just with sewing machine oil is able to make it spin as if it were just out of the factory.

Lots of people have owned them, lots of people on the QB, lots of people still use them, and like them. I hope yours gives you many more years of service.
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Old 01-16-2022, 04:58 PM
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I understand your love for the touch and sew machines. My 778 is still working, too. I loved using them to teach children to sew. The low speed is perfect for learning sewers. (I can't tell you how many times I sewed through my fingernail when I was learning on my mom's 15-91).

As Joe said, the "dissing" is related to the plastic gears. I once bought 20 sewing machines in an auction. All of the touch and sews (4 or 5) had shattered gears. Leon sent me a 750 for my kids and it's gear under the bobbin winder shattered within 2 weeks. Replacing the gears is not for the faint of heart. Having it done professionally was around $200.00. I'm not sure what the cost is these days.

Learning that the gears disintegrate discourage most people from recommending the Touch and Sews. One they buy one and it dies, they are not happy. They sew well when they work. Keeping them in a controlled environment (not in a shed or garage) prolongs their life.

I agree. They can be great machines.

Bkay
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Old 01-16-2022, 05:23 PM
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I had a Touch and Sew and the bobbin winder wore out. It still sewed fine but winding bobbins by hand was not for me. I had it for several years and upgraded to a Bernina.
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Old 01-17-2022, 05:54 AM
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Originally Posted by bkay View Post
I understand your love for the touch and sew machines. My 778 is still working, too. I loved using them to teach children to sew. The low speed is perfect for learning sewers. (I can't tell you how many times I sewed through my fingernail when I was learning on my mom's 15-91).

As Joe said, the "dissing" is related to the plastic gears. I once bought 20 sewing machines in an auction. All of the touch and sews (4 or 5) had shattered gears. Leon sent me a 750 for my kids and it's gear under the bobbin winder shattered within 2 weeks. Replacing the gears is not for the faint of heart. Having it done professionally was around $200.00. I'm not sure what the cost is these days.

Learning that the gears disintegrate discourage most people from recommending the Touch and Sews. One they buy one and it dies, they are not happy. They sew well when they work. Keeping them in a controlled environment (not in a shed or garage) prolongs their life.

I agree. They can be great machines.

Bkay
I guess it's just the luck of the draw then. I bought mine 'cause my mom loved hers. Never had a problem. Never even HEARD of a problem until I started posting here. I'm sorry to hear so many folks did have problems, but the features of the 750 are so much better than many modern machines that I'm amazed that Singer dumped them instead of fixing their plastic problem--like the 750 bobbin system--in favor of the AWFUL bobbin of my 5050, for example. The 750 is a breeze to thread, unlike my 5050 that seems to un-thread itself at every opportunity. Ah...like the song says..."Those were the good ol' days..." Gee, can you tell I don't do change easily?

Lesson learned, tho. (TY!) If I ever do have to replace "Goldie" I'll go for a mechanical built with metal (not plastic).

Those folks who didn't have my luck really missed out on a workhorse and they have my sympathies.

Rusty
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Old 01-17-2022, 11:38 AM
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Everyone has different likes. I see a lot of people dissing Bernina's and I love both of mine. Don't take it personally.
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