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Thread suggestions/cautions for newbie

Thread suggestions/cautions for newbie

Old 02-21-2021, 07:47 AM
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Default Thread suggestions/cautions for newbie

Hi! Iím very inexperienced so I apologize if these questions are basic! And if anyone has an introductory book recommendation, Iíd appreciate it!!

What Iím wondering is... if thereís any rules or general cautions about the type of thread I should be using with an antique treadle machine. Iím coming from weaving, so I have a lot of fine cotton warp thread in my studio but I know I should be using low-shed fibers instead. Is there a recommended type of thread for antique machines?

Project context... I want to start a practice project doing a very basic quilt block with a few pieces of medium weight broadcloth cotton. My machine is a White Family Rotary c.1915-20. It has a newer, unmarked needle installed, that is flat on one side. Do I also need to choose thread by needle size?

thank you!!
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Old 02-21-2021, 08:28 AM
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Remember that when the machines were made, they were required to work with the thread that was available. My treadle is not fussy about any thread I use. I have done everything from thick denim thread to modern polyester. Just adjust your thread tension until you get a well balanced stitch.
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Old 02-21-2021, 09:21 AM
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Any machine will sew better with a quality thread. If you buy the cheapest thread you can find, you will get a cheap stitch quality. I recommend Gutermann or Metler. When sewing on cotton fabrics, use cotton thread. When sewing on polyester fabrics or stretchy fabrics, use polyester threads.
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Old 02-21-2021, 09:55 AM
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I love sewing on my treadle machine and use the same thread that I use on my current machines and Feather Weights (FW). I love Glide threads because they are stronger than many and I love the lighter weight of the thread. For day to day sewing I will use Gutermann's thread. Again I like the strength of these threads and they both work great in my treadle.
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Old 02-21-2021, 10:04 AM
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Newer threads leave less "fluff" in your machine. I use Glide for nearly everything. It is polyester, smooth, strong and comes in a wonderful array of colors. I do use it even when sewing on cotton fabric. The reasoning for using cotton thread on cotton fabrics was that if there was stress on the fabric, the threads would give and the fabric wouldn't tear. I have never found that to be a problem. Maybe you could do some experiments and let us know what you think.

The best basic quilting book I know of is an old one by Laura Nounes, (Nownes ?), "Quilt, Quilt, Quilt." Maybe someone will write in with more accurate spelling or a more current book, but I did learn a lot from that one. Once the Covid crisis is over, taking classes is a great way to learn, too. And so is YouTube.

And welcome from sunny Southern California!
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Old 02-21-2021, 07:08 PM
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Thank you all for the suggestions! I think I'll try finding a few neutral tones of Glide, since they appear to be larger spools, just to start. And it looks like there's a few Gutermann mixed color packs. I'll check my local shop when I visit this week

The cotton on cotton rule seems to follow the same idea as using cotton for warp threads when weaving. The cotton warps can hold a higher tension without stretching, so when the fabric relaxes it won't bunch or curl. Meanwhile the weft can really be anything, and I normally use wool or wool-nylon blends, which are pretty flexible. I'd guess you want to pick cotton if you're making something that's going to carry weight, like a bag or what-not. I'm super curious now!

Thank you SallyS for the book suggestion, I'll definitely look for that book (great title!). I'd love to take some classes, jeez... but at least there's YouTube.
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Old 02-21-2021, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by SallyS View Post
...
The best basic quilting book I know of is an old one by Laura Nounes, (Nownes ?), "Quilt, Quilt, Quilt." Maybe someone will write in with more accurate spelling or a more current book, ...
It looks like the authors are Diana McClun and Laura Nownes. There are three editions according to https://www.amazon.com/Quilts-Comple.../dp/1933308346 The first was named "Quilts Quilts and More Quilts!" in 2010. The second and third editions in 2012 and 2013 were called "Quilts! Quilts!! Quilts!!!"

Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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Old 02-22-2021, 12:48 PM
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I saw a sign at a
Sewing machine repair shop that said, we won't repair a machine if you have been using Coats and Clark thread.
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Old 02-22-2021, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by leonf View Post
I saw a sign at a
Sewing machine repair shop that said, we won't repair a machine if you have been using Coats and Clark thread.
really? Why?
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Old 02-22-2021, 06:50 PM
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Interesting! The new Coats and Clark polyester is a strange thread. When you put it in the bobbin and pull, you can feel a strong vibration. When I go to sew-off a machine, I can tell if it's got Coats and Clark in the bobbin. We can't get a balanced zig-zag stitch with it. I've found that customers don't generally know what a balanced stitch looks like, and don't really care too much. But it certainly doesn't damage the machine. The old Coats and Clark had cotton wrapped around a poly core. It has a better stitch quality, but is more linty. As long as you're regularly cleaning the bobbin area, it shouldn't be a problem. Poly thread generally needs a tighter bobbin tension than cotton thread.
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