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  • Vintage Sewing Machine Shop.....Come on in and sit a spell

    Old 05-23-2012, 07:59 PM
      #34771  
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    what machine would fit in this cabinet?
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    Old 05-23-2012, 08:03 PM
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    How anyone do this?? http://calgary.kijiji.ca/c-buy-and-s...AdIdZ381451947 I couldn't kill any live machine.
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    Old 05-23-2012, 09:12 PM
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    I need some information on a Singer model 15. I saw a pretty blackside one, from 1942 in a cabinet. It needs to be rewired, and there's no needle clamp on the needle bar, so I can't even try it out by hand. The hand wheel moves very easily though. I'm thinking they want too much for it as it is priced $150 or $175. I was thinking that it was worth more in the $50 price range. Am I right, or completely off base? It is in a resale shop. Thanks for any info anyone wants to tell me either pro or against getting a 15. Don't know what the __ part of the 15 it is. Any help here? It isn't on e of the 3/4 machines like the 99, is it?
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    Old 05-23-2012, 09:15 PM
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    Originally Posted by Janis
    I need some information on a Singer model 15. I saw a pretty blackside one, from 1942 in a cabinet. It needs to be rewired, and there's no needle clamp on the needle bar, so I can't even try it out by hand. The hand wheel moves very easily though. I'm thinking they want too much for it as it is priced $150 or $175. I was thinking that it was worth more in the $50 price range. Am I right, or completely off base? It is in a resale shop. Thanks for any info anyone wants to tell me either pro or against getting a 15. Don't know what the __ part of the 15 it is. Any help here? It isn't on e of the 3/4 machines like the 99, is it?
    If it's missing parts, I wouldn't even pay $50 for it. But, that's me:> 15's are great machines, but keep looking. You don't need one this instant, right? Have patience and one with all the parts in your price range will pop up. They ALWAYS do.
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    Old 05-23-2012, 09:23 PM
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    I think that it's just that it's the krinkled blackside that is interesting me. And then too, I'd have to haul it all the way back to IN from the Chicago suburbs area. Probably too much bother. I really like the shiny black machines, but these dull black rough ones are interesting me too. I don't think they'd go way down on the price any way. thanks for telling me to wait. I know my hubby would be happier.
    I just got my second 99 (B. 1924) a week or so ago. I did find out looking on the net, that the 99's were electrified in 1921, and the photo at the sewalot site shows one in the case on a table and no foot pedalsshowing, so that must be when the knee bar was invented. Maybe the knee bar one was before the one with the foot pedal.

    Last edited by Janis; 05-23-2012 at 09:33 PM.
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    Old 05-23-2012, 09:36 PM
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    Originally Posted by miriam
    My mom used to make bras on her FW back in the 60s - all cotton just a bit of elastic across the back. They weren't too bad. She copied a store bought one.
    Miriam, Your mom sounds like she was a frugal and talented lady from all of your tales about her.
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    Old 05-23-2012, 09:42 PM
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    Originally Posted by Janis
    I think that it's just that it's the krinkled blackside that is interesting me. And then too, I'd have to haul it all the way back to IN from the Chicago suburbs area. Probably too much bother. I really like the shiny black machines, but these dull black rough ones are interesting me too. I don't think they'd go way down on the price any way. thanks for telling me to wait. I know my hubby would be happier.
    I just got my second 99 (B. 1924) a week or so ago. I did find out looking on the net, that the 99's were electrified in 1921, and the photo at the sewalot site shows one in the case on a table and no foot pedalsshowing, so that must be when the knee bar was invented. Maybe the knee bar one was before the one with the foot pedal.
    I'm an enabler if the situation is right! And I love to fix machines if the price is right. But, to ask premium prices(or even above the going rate) the machine should be in immaculate condition and have all its parts. I buy machines that need love, but I won't pay over a set amount and I stick to that. Because as the old saying goes, "Vintage machines are like buses. Another one will come, you just don't know when." You can always give them an offer and see what happens, but so many people on ebay and CL are dreamers when it comes to these machines!
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    Old 05-24-2012, 02:14 AM
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    Originally Posted by vintagemotif
    Miriam, Your mom sounds like she was a frugal and talented lady from all of your tales about her.
    My mom is so frugal it scares us all to death. You know how chicken comes packaged? She washes them out and re-uses those things - she finds all kinds of uses... She put Christmas cookies on them and gave cookies to all the neighbors. She re-uses zip bags. She leaves meat out of the freezer (for hours) to thaw. Oh and that is just the tip of the iceberg.... They have the 'flu' sometimes... My sister is staying there. She says she prays over the food a lot. Worst of it is, my other sister's hubby works for a MAJOR grocery store in town and is the head of food safety... He freaks out when ever he goes over there. He always asks, 'who brought the meat' or he brings the meat. We have had to find creative ways to do family dinners. Mom always used to provide the meat. Nobody will eat hers. She is 86 now and still frugal and a whole lot forgetful.
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    Old 05-24-2012, 04:37 AM
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    Miriam, your mother sounds like mine was with the plastic bags. They were a luxury!! I remember how she used to wash them out and put them over a rack to dry. She would save all of them. But then too, you have to remember they went through the depression and WW2 when things were scarce. My mother went through WW1 as well!
    I don't blame your sister for praying well before meals. I think I'd do the same!
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    Old 05-24-2012, 07:40 AM
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    Originally Posted by Janis
    Miriam, your mother sounds like mine was with the plastic bags. They were a luxury!! I remember how she used to wash them out and put them over a rack to dry. She would save all of them. But then too, you have to remember they went through the depression and WW2 when things were scarce. My mother went through WW1 as well!
    I don't blame your sister for praying well before meals. I think I'd do the same!
    My mama, God rest her soul, was like that too. She would reheat until it was gone. I got to where I was scared of leftovers at her house. That is why I have a big dog to eat the leftovers here. Mama reused bread and bun packages sometimes and probably had 100 butter bowls when she moved the last time, and after she died, we threw away 50 plastic coffee cans, and that wasn't all of them. I am thrifty somewhat, but I try to stay on this side of hoarding..............except when it comes to sewing machines.
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