Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: what am I?

  1. #1
    Senior Member MrsBoats's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western Tidewater, VA
    Posts
    465

    what am I?

    I just got an email from my dad, who said he'd be bringing this down with him when he comes next month. (I'm slowly sucking everyone I know into my hobby! *insert demented cackle here*) First he said it's "Standard Model A", then he corrected himself and said it's "Rotary Model A". Neither of those is getting me anywhere with Google, but I know I recognize the decals from somewhere, I just can't think where. Any info would be helpful! I know nothing about this one, including things like does it run, is the bobbin case there, etc. Dad just saw it, liked the decals and thought I would too.

    This will join my herd of old rotaries, which seems to be growing. (I swear, the first friction-drive rotary sat in my sewing room and put out The Call-they just started turning up!) Everything but the Imperial Kenmore should be home from the shop this weekend (that one is still waiting for me to rewire it, although I may get to that today, if there's no painting to do), so I hope to get some pictures taken.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    -Karen
    There's no such thing as too many sewing machines!

  2. #2
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,361
    I am not sure. You sure have a great dad.

  3. #3
    Senior Member MrsBoats's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western Tidewater, VA
    Posts
    465
    Yup. I inherited my love of all things mechanical and fiddly from him-he was a machinist and had his own shop. I started sweeping the floor for ice cream when I was six or so; by the time I was in my mid-teens, I was running the machinery. That's been a while ago, but I still have grease under my nails, and my own toolbox. He's mostly retired now, so he kinda enjoys my hobby vicariously. He's happy, I'm happy. It's all good!
    -Karen
    There's no such thing as too many sewing machines!

  4. #4
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,971
    Blog Entries
    10
    Looks to be a National Rotary.

  5. #5
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Carolina - But otherwise, NOTW
    Posts
    8,073
    Blog Entries
    9
    Monica, that's what I was going to guess....National made so many of those with a thousand different names!!!

  6. #6
    Muv
    Muv is offline
    Senior Member Muv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    England
    Posts
    820
    MrsBoats - haven't you got a great dad! He'd have a great time in this country.... I hope you have a lovely time tinkering together when he visits.

    I've said it before, and I'm not being rude, but to my eyes American machines look really strange. Why that big bump under the spool pin on the left? It looks like the funnel on a steam engine.

  7. #7
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW (I wish it was the Ozarks!)
    Posts
    6,509
    Blog Entries
    6
    Muv, I thought it strange too, and wondered if the machine isn't an adaptation of a machine with a leaf spring tension?
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Muv
    Muv is offline
    Senior Member Muv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    England
    Posts
    820
    Charlee- you mean those really weird looking American machines with the fancy set-up on top for the tension? I always wondered what they were called.

  9. #9
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW (I wish it was the Ozarks!)
    Posts
    6,509
    Blog Entries
    6
    Yes Muv...I think maybe this one has the mechanics for the dial type tension, but they hadn't yet adapted the body of the machine to adjust for it...so they stuck a spool pin in it and called it good!

    (Pure speculation on my part, but it made sense to me!)
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member MrsBoats's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western Tidewater, VA
    Posts
    465
    I'd wondered about the bump too. This being a transitional model makes sense!
    And yes, I agree that it's a National. I don't know where he got the "A" from, but I found this: http://www.ismacs.net/national/rotary_b.html , which looks just the same.
    -Karen
    There's no such thing as too many sewing machines!

  11. #11
    Super Member great aunt jacqui's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    new hampshire
    Posts
    1,569
    I try to be rational and leave my collection at 2 but in my heart there is always room for more. in my home there is no room. lol good luck
    always give back and forward

  12. #12
    Senior Member MrsBoats's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western Tidewater, VA
    Posts
    465
    I have a one in-one out policy, but it's fairly, er, flexible, especially for just heads. I can *always* find room for another one of those, it's the table that take up space.

    The last time Hubby counted my sewing machines, I counted his fishing poles (conveniently in the other end of my sewing room) and that was the end of that!
    -Karen
    There's no such thing as too many sewing machines!

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Clearwater Kansas
    Posts
    386
    Isn't this forum the greates? Need an answer and you get it. Great looking machine.

  14. #14
    Senior Member greywuuf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    middle of nowhere Alaska
    Posts
    715
    just a though on the strange bump/funnel/stack thing. Recall that in this era machine frames were cast iron affairs, and casting iron with sand required making molds. mold makers were professionals and it was a bit of an art ( though they were not really that well paid ) but if you have a working and proven mold, no sense changing horses mid stream. Also and this is just speculation and rambling molds parted and everything cast had to be made with a 'draft" ( taper so that it would come free of the sand.... the funnel could also have been the remnants of incorporated into the "sprue" the hole that the molten metal was poured into. has the correct tapered shape and a simple facing operation to cut it off flat is much less labor intensive than trying to machine it down clear to the rounded contour of the arm.

  15. #15
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW (I wish it was the Ozarks!)
    Posts
    6,509
    Blog Entries
    6
    greywuuf, that top piece is pretty big to be a sprue for casting...and while I can understand your theory because of my study of cast iron cookware, I don't believe that this is a sprue. I've yet to see a true sprue on a sewing machine, due to the large "underside" of the machines, it would not have been necessary, nor would it have made sense, to pour from the top of the machine head. Even the oldest of machines don't have a sprue on the top side of the machine that I've seen.
    Interesting theory tho, and one that bears more investigation!
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.