Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main > For Vintage & Antique Machine Enthusiasts
What constitutes a vintage sewing machine? >

What constitutes a vintage sewing machine?

What constitutes a vintage sewing machine?

Old 05-02-2014, 09:35 AM
  #1  
Super Member
Thread Starter
 
GrammaNan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Colorado
Posts: 4,879
Default What constitutes a vintage sewing machine?

My DH went through a stage last year where he thought every old sewing machine at a thrift store was worth money. I have two treadles and about eight older machines now. I am going to do more research on all of them. The treadles will work if I can figure out how to put the belts on. One treadle is over 100 years old (I was told) and I cannot get the belt to meet and stay connected. Anyway.... my main question is; I read somewhere on the QB that you can remove the feed dogs and do FMQ on an older machine. Is that true?
GrammaNan is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 09:56 AM
  #2  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Outer Space
Posts: 9,319
Default

It's a myth that you have to lower the feed dogs to do FMQing. You can do it just fine with the feed dogs up. I do prefer to lower them, but some people will keep them up on purpose. It' s just a slightly different "feel". Give it a try.
Candace is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 10:24 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: New England
Posts: 865
Default

As I understand it, a vintage machine is less than 100 years old whereas an antique machine is more than 100 years old. I'm not sure of the number at the other end - does anyone know if it is 40 years old that the vintage machine needs to be, or maybe 60?

You don't need to lower feed dogs to fmq. If yours won't lower, you might try a Stoppax darning attachment, often available on ebay. That will make any machine fmq. I suggest you do not attempt to remove any feed dogs to fmq. Those old screws are likely to break off. Ask me how I know.

There is a pair of pliers made specifically for putting a leather belt on a treadle machine. Anyone know where to get one? I see them on ebay from time to time.

Cricket
cricket_iscute is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 12:10 PM
  #4  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Centralia, WA, USA
Posts: 4,890
Default

All old sewing machines are worth money-just not a lot of it.
There are plenty of old sewing machines who's feed dogs will lower easily. Another solution is to set the stitch length to zero or use some blue painters tape and tape a piece of card stock over them if they don't. Far simpler than taking the feed dogs out.
Rodney
Rodney is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 01:25 PM
  #5  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 7,375
Default

the pliers are just an easier way to cut and punch a hole in the leather belt. If your belt is too short, then buy a new belt and start over. They come long so you cut them to the length you need. They also come in a few diameters - but most of the differences are for what you prefer, your treadle won't care. They sell for $5 - $10 and are readily available.

I consider "vintage" to be non - electronic, which is about pre 1980 machines. My significant interest is in machined from around 1900-1930.
Macybaby is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 03:02 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 615
Default

I figure if it doesn't have an electronic part on/in it then it could be considered vintage. I have a mid 90's Bernette that would be considered old by today's standards but it is purely a mechanical machine. Compared to that a thats a late 90's plastic Husqvarna i recently acquired. They seem to be from two different era only because of the components So I guess all mechanical machines up until the mid eighties. The only reason why i bought these 90's era machines is because I will never be able to afford a brand new Bernina. LOL and I needed a lighter easy to transport machine like the the Husqvarna for classes and such. Of course both were under my $30 price point. The Husqvarna was $10. *wink*

My main interest in machines seems to be from the 1940's to 1960's and some 1970 Kenmores.
foufymaus is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 04:18 PM
  #7  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 200
Default

Originally Posted by cricket_iscute View Post
As I understand it, a vintage machine is less than 100 years old whereas an antique machine is more than 100 years old. I'm not sure of the number at the other end - does anyone know if it is 40 years old that the vintage machine needs to be, or maybe 60?

You don't need to lower feed dogs to fmq. If yours won't lower, you might try a Stoppax darning attachment, often available on ebay. That will make any machine fmq. I suggest you do not attempt to remove any feed dogs to fmq. Those old screws are likely to break off. Ask me how I know.

There is a pair of pliers made specifically for putting a leather belt on a treadle machine. Anyone know where to get one? I see them on ebay from time to time.

Cricket
50 years is vintage and 100 years is antique.
singerguy is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 04:25 PM
  #8  
Super Member
 
SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7,741
Default

The treasure is the history of the machines that your DH brought home. Doing the research and such takes you into another world which can be quite addictive and thrilling. I just brought home a 1889 Wilcox & Gibbs treadle. The inventor of it is a genius, in my book. Katie joined my other vintage/antique/treasure machines. Enjoy doing your homework. There is so much help here on the board.
SewExtremeSeams is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 05:25 PM
  #9  
Super Member
 
amcatanzaro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Springfield, OH
Posts: 1,079
Default

Darn it, I put my two cents in but I didn't hit reply.

I consider antique to be 100+ years old and vintage to be 40+. I don't usually touch the machines from the 70's though.

Foufy shops like me, $30 is usually my limit. I'm looking for fixer uppers though, not ready to go machines.
amcatanzaro is offline  
Old 05-02-2014, 07:37 PM
  #10  
Super Member
 
manicmike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 1,851
Default

Originally Posted by amcatanzaro View Post
I consider antique to be 100+ years old and vintage to be 40+. I don't usually touch the machines from the 70's though.
Anastasia, antiques are 100+ years, because it's a fact. Well, it was a fact: I was taught it and so were some older people I asked but now Wikipedia has a weaker version "It is common practice to define "antique" as applying to objects at least 100 years old.". This doesn't stop eBayers listing anything from the '40s or '50s (even '60s) as antique (grr!).
Vintage is a different story, and there are a lot of people who consider 30 or even 20 years to be vintage! If you list something on Etsy, they list anything more than 20 years old as vintage
Only machine I touched from the 1970s was a Bernina 830 record. Fantastic machine, but not really any better than my 1950s 530-2 record. The older one has no plastic at all so it was much easier to fall for, not to mention that it was free.
manicmike is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Boston1954
Main
37
02-05-2018 02:06 PM
Silver Needle
Main
12
02-06-2014 12:43 PM
beatys9
Main
24
10-26-2012 06:50 PM
Nolee
Main
3
07-01-2011 09:06 AM
Lacelady
Main
21
09-15-2009 04:39 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.