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This is why I don't like slant shanks

This is why I don't like slant shanks

Old 04-09-2020, 05:50 AM
  #11  
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The original post got me thinking "why do a slant shank at all?" So thanks for the answer and I'll keep it in mind.
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Old 04-09-2020, 11:06 AM
  #12  
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My 401A bought new in 1958 has been my main machine all these years. It has sewn leather, jeans and every kind of very thick fabrics and never had that problem with it. She sews as beautiful today as when she was new.
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Old 04-10-2020, 09:30 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by crafty pat View Post
My 401A bought new in 1958 has been my main machine all these years. It has sewn leather, jeans and every kind of very thick fabrics and never had that problem with it. She sews as beautiful today as when she was new.
My previous post was mostly just musings...and talking to some engineering-types since, I've been convinced that likely a home user wouldn't notice a difference in a slant shank vs straight needle machine. If you need to sew industrial things you're gonna get an industrial machine, but I'm betting most things you can fit into a home machine for sewing would be addressed equally by slant vs. straight.
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Old 04-14-2020, 04:53 PM
  #14  
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I've had the same problem when sewing through thick layers. Here' what I think is causing it. When sewing forward, the needle goes into the fabric, and comes out while the feet start to move the fabric. When going backward, the needle comes down - while the fabric is moving. With thin fabric this doesn't matter. But with thick fabric, the needle is in the fabric as the fabric moves and that movement deflects the needle away from the needle hole. The solution is to use small back stitches.
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:15 PM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by tate_elliott View Post
I've had the same problem when sewing through thick layers. Here' what I think is causing it. When sewing forward, the needle goes into the fabric, and comes out while the feet start to move the fabric. When going backward, the needle comes down - while the fabric is moving. With thin fabric this doesn't matter. But with thick fabric, the needle is in the fabric as the fabric moves and that movement deflects the needle away from the needle hole. The solution is to use small back stitches.
That makes a lot of sense -- and reflects some of my mask-sewing difficulties this past weekend. Thanks!
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Old 04-21-2020, 06:59 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by tate_elliott View Post
I've had the same problem when sewing through thick layers. Here' what I think is causing it. When sewing forward, the needle goes into the fabric, and comes out while the feet start to move the fabric. When going backward, the needle comes down - while the fabric is moving. With thin fabric this doesn't matter. But with thick fabric, the needle is in the fabric as the fabric moves and that movement deflects the needle away from the needle hole. The solution is to use small back stitches.
Thanks for this comment, I too am going to be watching this.
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