Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Amazing explaination of what a person with chronic pain goes through.

  1. #1
    Super Member Quiltforme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Beautiful Washington state!
    Posts
    3,344
    http://www.butyoudontlooksick.com/na...poonTheory.pdf

    Murphy posted this link in another post and wanted to pass it on to those of us who suffer chronic pain and have a hard time with others understanding. I look perfectly healthy talking to me and looking at me you would never know I suffer from excrutiating back pain. This 2 page letter is so perfect I gave it to my mom and will give to my family they know what I live with but don't understand how I can do one activity but not others. Trying to explain how I have to prepare for a trip to the store takes 2 days. If you suffer from a chronic illness print this up and keep it on you it really does help explain to others wha you have to go through!
    Thank you Murphy for posting the link!!

  2. #2
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    15,096
    It's difficult for those that are TABs (temporarily able-bodied) to comprehend what it is like to live like that.

    Thank you for posting that link again.

  3. #3
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    35,335
    Wow!! Like her friend, I never realized how much this can affect your life. I have some pain, so I guess I have lots of spoons, not unlimited but usually enough to let me do most of what I "need" to do.

  4. #4
    Junior Member dutchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    279
    This is very similar to the "energy marbles" explanation that I use to describe my on-going battle with the mind-numbing fatigue my MS creates. Like Christine's spoons, I have only so many energy marbles to play in any given day. When they're gone, they're gone, and I'm fairly useless for the rest of the day.

    I'm going to print it out and post it on the refrigerator to remind my household that while I don't look sick, I'm not 100% and soup and sandwiches will suffice for supper.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,113
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thank you for posting this... it really puts hidden medical and or mental issues in perspective (((HUGS)))

  6. #6
    Super Member CoyoteQuilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,306
    What a great way to explain any type of illness. It is even easy enough for children to understand.

  7. #7
    Junior Member pamdux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Glen St Mary, Florida, USA
    Posts
    178
    I love how she explains being disabled. It is the best explanation I have ever seen. Thank you for posting this.

  8. #8
    Super Member Murphy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    8,906
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks for passing this on. It definitely bears repeating ;-)

  9. #9
    Senior Member craftyone27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    856
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks so mucj for posting this!! I also suffer from the "But you don't look sick - act sick" syndrome. I am only 44 and justslightly overweight and always put a good face on before I go out in public. But I have had 5 back surgeries and am in chronic pain. I also have a teenaged daughter with a developmental disability. Some days I spend with her doing her Special Olympics activities cost me 2 days worth of "spoons" at the other end. It is really difficult dealing with the odd lookks from acquaintances and strangers when I climb out of my car in the handicapped spot, or tell someone that I am on permanent disability at such a young age. Trust me - you can't always judge a book by it's cover - so try not to judge if you don't know the whole story.
    Thanks for listening.

  10. #10
    Super Member earlylace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Northwest, NJ
    Posts
    1,556
    thank you very much for sharing this link, it helped me understand how to tell others how I feel, even my family sometimes don't understand because I don't look sick either, I have chronic pain.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.