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Thread: new to canning

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by donnaree59
    Quote Originally Posted by cjsparks
    I recommend that you go to your county extension service. It should be in Reed City on West Upton Avenue. They should have publications that they can give you on canning. They might also know someone that might be willing to be a mentor. Don't forget that your tax dollars pays for the MSU Extension Service. It's just like libraries...we need to use these services. The extension services are not utilized near enough and are staff with great people.
    I agree. They have a wealth of information, recipes, directions, cautions, everything for the asking! Here in Georgia, they will also check your pressure gauges each year to make sure they are registering correctly.
    Good advice.

  2. #12
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    [quote=Peckish]I've never canned anything more complicated than jam, but my understanding is with meat you HAVE to use a pressure canner.
    ---------------------------------------
    I don't know about that, seems to me I remember having to sit with a wind up clock to watch for an hour, or maybe far longer for the water to boil over the jars, then go get Grandma when time was up. She fried the meat first, not cooked but browned it so it would taste good after being opened.

    Looking around on the Internet, I've found folks who say to water bath boil it for from...get this...from 3 hours to 5 hours!!!

    I do believe that pressure cookers is the way to go, except that I'm scared of them.

  3. #13
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    [quote=Peckish]I've never canned anything more complicated than jam, but my understanding is with meat you HAVE to use a pressure canner.
    ---------------------------------------
    I don't know about that, seems to me I remember having to sit with a wind up clock to watch for an hour, or maybe far longer for the water to boil over the jars, then go get Grandma when time was up. She fried the meat first, not cooked but browned it so it would taste good after being opened.

    Looking around on the Internet, I've found folks who say to water bath boil it for from...get this...from 3 hours to 5 hours!!!

    I do believe that pressure cookers is the way to go, except that I'm scared of them.

  4. #14
    Senior Member angiecub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seahorsesanna
    I have decided to try and learn how to can and am wondering what you think the best book would be for a beginner? I plan on using a pressure canner and will be canning fruits, veggies and meats like venison. Any ideas would be appreciated ~ thanks ladies ;-)
    You should get the
    Ball Blue Book. You will need both a hot water canner and pressure cooker, depending on what you want to can. Foods with a low acid content such as corn and beans require the pressure cooker. Those with high acid content such as tomatoes can use the hot water bath. Just follow the directions in the book, and you will be fine. have fun!

  5. #15
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    Definitely get the Ball Canning book. And if you google Home Canning you will get more info than you ever wanted. There is nothing difficult about a pressure canner, especially the newer ones with gauges, etc. You can boil meat in a hot water bath for as many hours a you want and the meat will never get hot enough to kill the botulism. Our mothers and grandmothers were lucky with their canning. And they did have things spoil. I remember as a kid dumping many jars of stinky spoiled vegies. Canning meat is not a necessity but it tastes better than anything out of a freezer.

  6. #16
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I use both the water bath method and a 22 quart pressure
    canner. Pressure cookers work great and shouldn't be scary, just follow the directions and keep an eye on your pressure gauge.
    I've been canning since 1997 and have put up carrots,beets
    ,green beans,tomatoes and salsa. My Dh grows a big garden every year and its so nice to have fresh produce.

  7. #17
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I'd really like to can my beef stew, but I want a pressure canner to ensure it's done properly. I DO NOT want my family getting sick!

  8. #18
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    #1 My mom.
    #2 Ball canning book

  9. #19
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    I always use a water canner

  10. #20
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    I can everything I make my own apple pie mix tomatoe soup and even the small potatoes but you will need both a water canner and a pressure cooker as you use the water canner for peaches, pears etc. if you have questions you may pm me

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