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Thread: Canning bean with bacon soup

  1. #1

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    I've done all my research for canning bean with bacon soup, but has anyone here done it? Ball Blue Book, the University of Florida, and my favorite BwB soup stove-top recipe are my sources. I'm hoping to adapt my recipe to pressure canning. Attached is my preliminary round in the think-tank.

    Judy Lee :roll:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    You are ambitious. I have canned the beans before and I have froze stock for soup in cubes. Let me know how it comes out :D

  3. #3

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    Hi, Ruth

    Will post here as soon as the jars are cool enough to sample. Need to polish the recipe first, and decide on quarts or pints. Pints, most likely, because the first batch is always experimental. I've been meaning for the past few years to can my own BwB soup. Supermarket prices were bad enough back then, and are higher now. Will buy ingredients after May 1, and keep track of the cost. Thanks for the encouragement.

    Judy Lee

  4. #4
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
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    I have previously canned homemade chili, with beans/beef/spices, etc. It was such an easy meal when the kids were little. I could made a huge batch, then can it into quart jars. They loved it over corn chips/cheese for Sunday evening supper. I used all the hints and suggestions from the ball book. It worked great. Adjust the pressure for the altitude. I was in WY, so I used 14 lb of pressure. You will need less being in CA. I think I processed it for 1 hour, or was it for 90 minutes? Can't remember for sure without getting out my ball book. But it was a time saver.

    I also had a friend that canned DRY pinto beans. She put 2/3 cup of dry washed beans into a hot pint jar. Filled it with 1/2 tsp salt then boiling water to within 1 inch of the top. Process it for 40 minutes at recommended pressure for your altitude (mine was 14-15 lb). It was great to have beans ready to put into a cassarole/dip, etc. Hope you have some great tasting beans!

  5. #5

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    Sara

    This is my first time canning a convenience food, so I am encouraged by your example. If I can get the soup to work, plain pintos and chili are next. I've seen recipes for canning dry beans, but I'm not ready for that yet. I'm off to re-read the Ball book.

    Judy Lee

    :D

  6. #6
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
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    I think you have motivaged me too Judy Lee! It seems next to impossible to make a small batch of so many kinds of beans. But my family is getting smaller and smaller. If I were to make a batch, using the ham bone I kept in the freezer, I could can it, and enjoy it just a bottle at a time. I've canned my spaghetti sauce every summer for years- it's about 1000 times better than boughten!

    Here's something to make you smile. The first year I lived in Utah, just married to a wonderful batchlor with 2 boys. They helped me plant my little garden, enjoyed the tomatoes, then as they came ripe faster than they were being eaten, I decided to get a batch of spagetti sauce going. They watched me simmer, add peppers, onion, etc. They in amazement they declaired "Wow - you made tomatoes into FOOD" But since then, they are spoiled into thinking that I can cook (or mend) anything!

  7. #7

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    And smile I did! Kids have a totally enchanting view of the world. Thank you for that.

    I've looked through the Ball Blue Book again, and it all seems straightforward, so why am I hesitating? Maybe I'm questioning whether to process the bean soup partially cooked, or fully cooked--just make up my normal batch and load the canner. I'm overthinking this, I know, but I've got to get off dead center and DO something!




  8. #8

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    The bean with bacon soup turned out great, even though I used only 1 pound of bacon. Made up the difference with an envelope of Goya brand ham bouillon. The beans boiled for 30 minutes before being loaded into jars and processed. Two days later, the result is almost the same consistency as a commercial can of bwb soup. Recipe yielded 10 pints.

    I went on to can 7 pints of beef stew, but haven't opened any yet.

    DH has been complaining lately that I cook too much (too many leftovers), so this round of canning has satisfied my yen for a while. Just don't have the knack for cooking for two.

    Thanks, everyone, for your encouragement. I feel I have expanded a skill set that benefits everyone around me.

    Bean with bacon soup, home canned pints.
    Name:  Attachment-49672.jpe
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Size:  13.8 KB

  9. #9
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
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    Hi, Judy Lee. Would you mind sharing your recipe and how you did this with just a little more detail? I love bean and bacon soup, but I've never made my own. I'm canning today...Thanks!!

  10. #10

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    Hi Buttercream

    Will find my notes and post them here. Might take a day or two.

    Judy Lee

  11. #11

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    Loretta

    No, I wouldn't trust a waterbath canner with the bean with bacon soup recipe, because of the meat, which (as I understand it) requires higher temperature to be successfully canned. Waterbath canning is generally saved for acidic foods--jams, jellies, tomatoes, and some relishes/salsas. I'm hardly an expert, though, so maybe someone else here or on a canning web site can offer us both some guidance.

    Judy Lee

  12. #12
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judy Lee
    Hi Buttercream

    Will find my notes and post them here. Might take a day or two.

    Judy Lee
    Thank you. Take your time. I still have tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, and peach to work up.

  13. #13
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loretta
    Judy, could I make this and process in a water bath if I processed it a long time? (don't use a pressure cooker here- one exploded on my mother and I won't have them in the house.) But I wondered if I could water bath this for 2-3 hours and it would work?
    My mom had one blow up, too. What was yours cooking in it? Mine was cooking lima beans...
    I used to be afraid of them because of that. Are you sure you wouldn't consider giving one a chance? You just need to make sure your vent is open every time you put the lid on, and follow the directions.

  14. #14
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    Freezing soup works fine. I used to line my square quart containers with plastic freezer bags, and the resulting blocks were easy to stack. If you are fezzing in containers, crumple a little waxed paper on top to submerge the solids so they don't get freezer burn.

  15. #15
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loretta
    Sorry Miranda, I won't use them. Moms had vegetable soup in it and she could have been killed- but was ok after the burns healed. ICK! Maybe I will see if I can make some of this soup and freeze it. Think that would work?
    :( Sorry to hear that.
    Yeah, freezing shouldn't be any problem.

  16. #16
    Super Member Feathers's Avatar
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    I agree....a waterbath doesn't get hot enough to make the low acid foods such as beans and meat SAFE. There's this little bug called botulism that would LOVE to kill the whole family. Be very careful. I was always scared of a pressure canner, too but I have a Presto weighted guage canner that works great and i love it and I always feel confident that the foods cooked in it are going to be perfect.

  17. #17
    Super Member Feathers's Avatar
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    Great tip, Moonpi. I do that, too.

  18. #18
    Super Member Feathers's Avatar
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    Your soup looks wonderful! Having just come back from the County Fair I would say you could take a "Blue" ribbon with your soup. Good job.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Judy Lee
    Hi Buttercream

    Will find my notes and post them here. Might take a day or two.

    Judy Lee

    Haven't forgotten your request--going full bore on binding a queen-sized quilt for my son's birthday on Saturday. BwB soup notes on my list of TTD (things to do).

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