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Thread: new to canning

  1. #26
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    I've been canning for 60 years. Started first with the water bath canner, green beans for 3 hours. Did it this way for years, and my folks finally bought me a pressure canner. So much quicker, and nothing to be afraid of. Now I use it for everything except tomatoes and fruits, jellies, pickles, and jams. These still need the water bath canner. My first pressure canner got warped and I couldn't use it last year so bought a new one. This year when I got out my water bath, there were small holes in the bottom, so I bought a new one of them. I can for myself and a lot of other people. I have won prizes at my local county fair as well as the Indiana State Fair. Those State Fair Rosettes are nice to receive.

  2. #27
    Senior Member merchjag's Avatar
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    be careful -green beans have to be done in a pressure canner-they are low acid and can cause botulism if done in water bath-

  3. #28
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    I do a lot of canning. I would suggest you get a Ball canning book and a pressure cooker. Your water baths are mainly for jams, pickles, fuits and tomatoes. If you've planning on canning any types of eat, you'll need the pressure. Please be sure and read you manual before beginning. Once you turn out that first batch, you'll be wanting to can everything. Good luck!

  4. #29
    Super Member Feathers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donnaree59
    Quote Originally Posted by cjsparks
    I recommend that you go to your county extension service. It should be in Reed City on West Upton Avenue. They should have publications that they can give you on canning. They might also know someone that might be willing to be a mentor. Don't forget that your tax dollars pays for the MSU Extension Service. It's just like libraries...we need to use these services. The extension services are not utilized near enough and are staff with great people.
    I agree. They have a wealth of information, recipes, directions, cautions, everything for the asking! Here in Georgia, they will also check your pressure gauges each year to make sure they are registering correctly.
    s

    Above are the best suggestions on this thread. DO CHECK OUT THE EXTENSION OFFICE. I am a volunteer food preserver with the Ext. Office locally. I teach jam/jelly making, canning, drying, freezing classes for the Ext. Office. PRESSURE CAN ALL MEATS, SEA FOODS, FISH, GAME, BEANS, LOW ACID FOODS AND VEGGIES ALWAYS! We had a family almost die of botulism from eating canned asparagus done in a water bath canner so make sure you follow the BALL Canning book directions. Make sure your Ball canning book is up-to-date. This book can be purchased at any store carrying canning supplies...Walmart, Bi-Mart, Kmart, etc. It costs about $7.99. They put out a new book on occasion because veggy seeds are hybids to get bigger, better, faster growing, etc. produce. Tomatoes USED to be high acid but now they've been hybrid to the point where you must use extra acid in each jar and process the tomatoes longer than you use to have to do. FOLLOW DIRECTIONS WHEN CANNING and you will have wonderful, safe food for your family.

  5. #30
    Senior Member clynns's Avatar
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    Contact your county extension agent. We got a copy of the canning book that they use. Free. I don't know how they can give it away. But they did. (The 'book' was in a 2 inch folder). The Ball Canning book is what I use.

  6. #31
    Super Member rexie's Avatar
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    I try to "can", but I don't use a pressure canner. I water bath anything that needs it. I have bought lots of books, but the best way I have ,learned is to talk to seasoned canners and gardeners. You know, the little older ladies just down the street. Now, I attempt anything...except the pressure canner.

  7. #32
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    Congratulations on your new endeavor - it was always rewarding to me to see the jars all lined up knowing that I could eat the "fruits of my labor" all winter long. My advice is to get the Ball Canning Book, which I believe is still readily available. Also consult your pressure canner instructions, and their recommendations. Some vegetables only need a water bath, and others the pressure canner, so get the Ball book and you will be successful. I don't have a garden now, but when I did I enjoyed the process, as it brought back memories of home and my Mom canning for us. Good luck.

  8. #33
    Senior Member TymeToShine's Avatar
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    definately a pressure canner - esp with meat!

  9. #34
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    Would advise that you take into account the size
    of your stove top "burner". I find the smaller pressure
    canner is not too heavy for my stove and when canning
    I can still lift the full canner. Also use the canner for
    cooking everyday foods, ie: navy beans.etc. Others
    here may be able to give you some considerations as
    to size. I have a electric water bath canner I use a lot.

    Happy canning :thumbup:

  10. #35
    Cassews's Avatar
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    www.ball.com I believe is the Ball canning internet address. I swear by the Ball Blue Book, we used Ball canning jars for tomatoes. You can use any jar that has Ball on the bottom of it for jellie/jams. Dearest Grandmother in law when she was alive god rest her soul and the kids & I would can every summer. Make jams & jellies, senfgerken, tomatoes, relishes and lots of others but we always used the Ball Blue Book. Check to see if you can get one at the local library on loan then maybe copy the recipes you like. All I can say is time & patience, as it takes oodles of time to make things, but come this winter you will be so glad you took the time to do that !

  11. #36
    Super Member katiebear1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish
    I've never canned anything more complicated than jam, but my understanding is with meat you HAVE to use a pressure canner.

    Sorry I don't have any recommendations for books - I always used the chart that came with the pectin.
    Also a lot of veggies too. Tomatoes and pickels have a lot of acid so your can can them with a water bath. When I decided to learn to can I bought a canning kit came with everything you needed to water bath can and the book "Ball Blue Book of Preserving" Really good book. Tells you everything you need to know, has some good recipes and is not too complicated.

  12. #37
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    The ball canning book is the best. I have been canning for years. It is the best easiest to follow book. I use a water bath for some things and pressure canner for others. I don't like meat that has been canned it gets a weird texture. I do can vegetable soup with meat. When I had the 4 kids at home I canned about 400 jars a year. Yard sales are a good source for jars. Check for nicks on the top edge before buying. I got nearly all of my jars at yard sales.

  13. #38
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    I just read the book that came with my pressure cooker. Learned as I went along. Kerr and Ball books are good.

  14. #39
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    I agree. Our county extension office is the repository for all the latest information about safe canning. There's lots of information on the web, just make sure it comes from a reliable source.

  15. #40
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    Nothing to be afraid of with a pressure canner- just follow the directions. Also, I use it as my water bath canner too, just don't seal the top on. Love to can all kinds of things, but have never done meat. I'd like to try chicken this year, my Mom said it was her favorite thing that her Mom canned. So convenient too, for soup or chicken pie- enchiladas, what ever.

  16. #41

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    find a manual and read it carefully...they can blow up.
    My daughter wanted to can after she got married and while talking to her one day she told me about it and thru the conversation she mentioned the water level and then I asked her if she was doing water bath or pressure and she informed me she was pressure and I told her she put in way too much water she had filled it like water bath I informed her she was lucky it didn't "blow" for her. So really read your manual

  17. #42
    Super Member grannypat7925's Avatar
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    The Blue Ball Book of Canning and Preserving.

  18. #43
    Super Member grannypat7925's Avatar
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    Ball Blue Book of Canning

  19. #44
    Super Member Iamquilter's Avatar
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    I use a pressure canner and the Ball canning book. Try the extension office if you have one in your area, they always have information for just about anything pertaining to canning or freezing. As other said be sure your jars have no nicks in them as they will not seal.

  20. #45
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    my grandmother taught me canning. i did not use the pressure cooker because i was scared of it. it boiled water in a pot and put the jars in there to seal them. The Ball cannng book is what I used. good luck and have fun...

  21. #46
    Member JoyMar's Avatar
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    You have to use the pressure cooker with certain foods, but a water bath cooker works with high acid foods. So you would probably use both. I know I do. :-D

  22. #47
    Senior Member nancy59's Avatar
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    I have a Ball canning book but I also another "Home Preserving" book by Judi Kingry and Lauren Devine. It depends on what you are canning but if it is venison you need pressure canner. I use water for the jams/jellies. Word of warning, when you pressure can tomatoes, they will come out like a lot of water and smooched tomatoes at the top. You didn't do anything wrong, they will "settle" back down, you don't have to re-open, dump the liquid and re-can. That year I had real thick tomatoes.

  23. #48
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    I still can beef. Boy, does that taste great and it's a blessing when you need something in a hurry. Used to use the big pressure canner but sold that. Now use a pressure pan. Only 3 pts. at a time, but that is plenty for just one person. I always enjoyed canning and freezing. Felt as though I had really accomplished a great deal.

  24. #49

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    I would buy a Bernardin canning book or check the Bernardin.ca website. I always use the hot water bath canner with good results and I am buy no means an expert.

  25. #50
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    Canning can be so much fun. Too bad it happens primarily in the summer heat. But, you don't really need a book. All the information you need is right here on line. Just google in the information you're looking for. That will bring up a lot of sites from schools and agracultural sites. They are very simple. I had used a sunset book for years (before internet). I found that an easy book to follow. They have their subjects in catagories and charted ie. frozen foods, canning fruits, canning vegetables, meat, etc. very easy to follow and also has recipes. Ball didn't have their's grouped as easily to follow. But these days with internet . . . . . :thumbup:

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