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Thread: Apple Core.........Help Please

  1. #11
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    and like DP's, match the centers and ends/edges. then sew.

  2. #12
    moonangel12's Avatar
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    Thanks for this thread - the apple core is a pattern that I someday want to tackle (added to my list of Lone Star, Wedding Ring and Cathedral Window). I am interested in hearing all the tips and tricks that others might have!

    I do wonder if the added seam allowance might be causing it to pucker?

  3. #13
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    I just learned curves myself , what I did was sew two pieces together then press and clip. I found if I pressed as I went it was helpful in making sure it was laying flat and at that time i could check for ripples and puckering in my seam.

  4. #14
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I didn't clip any curves on mine and I used a rotary cutter on a plastic template. All the pieces fit perfectly together. No rippling. As someone said, it's because your pieces aren't fitting and there's stretching on the bias going on.

  5. #15
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    Can we see the back? That would give some clues?

    I've found it helpful to trace the stitching lines on the fabric.

    I've also found it helpful to mark the "half-way" point on each seam and pin those together.

    I'm thinking that this would be a lot easier to hand sew than machine sew. Then stop at the end of each seam. Then it would be easier to press.

    Also, it it a LOT more manageable with just the 1/4 inch seam allowances.

  6. #16
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I have never done this pattern, but have made curves and have some ideas. The outer curves don't need to be clipped, just the inny curves, but then you have to press towards the inny curves. It will lay nicely. Also, your seam allowances need to be 1/4 inch, but only for consistency of your stitching. Since you need to start and stop 1/4 inch away from the edge, if your seam allowances are all 1/4 inch, they will all fit at the end. If you do them larger, just remember to treat them all the same, measurements wise and again, it will fit nicely. Last, curves always need a little persuasive pressing. Starch will help persuade them to lay the way you want, or a spray bottle. Hope this helps.

  7. #17
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    If you want a really easy way to do this, go to Eleanor Burns website and watch her video:

    http://quiltinaday.com/theater/egg/egg1.html

    It's the video called: Old Maid's Puzzle and Double Axehead. Axehead is another name for Apple Core.

    Video number is 2705. She shows how to make two blocks in this video and the first one is the Old Maid's Puzzler or Drunkards path.

  8. #18
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Okay, I just noticed something. You're going about it all wrong. Do one row at a time. 1 up, 1 across until you get it as long as you want it. Then put the next row together the same way only start 1 across, 1 up until you get the same number of pieces. Then when you get two rows made like this you can sew them together matching your seams. Do you follow me? If not, I'll do a couple and take pictures and show you. Also your seams should start on one side and end on the other.

  9. #19
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  10. #20
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    In your second picture, your seam allowances are not all the same. Some of the corners are off, and this will affect your piecing. Some of your sides will be too short, and that will stretch on your other blocks.

    It doesn't really matter whether you use a 1/4" or a 1/2", but it has to be a consistent 1/4" or 1/2" seam :wink:

    Be very careful, you have bias edges... handle them carefully or they will stretch and distort.

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