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Thread: Apple Core.........Help Please

  1. #1
    Super Member ChubbyBunny's Avatar
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    I am trying to teach myself how to make an apple core quilt. I'm not having much luck so far. :-(

    After I sew the pieces together, they do not lie flat.....they ripple. I'm hoping my photos will give you an idea of what I am doing so you can help me figure out what I am doing wrong. Should I be sewing the apple core blocks in rows? Should I be clipping & turning all four sides of the block?

    Would one or more of you lovely people please help me figure out what the problem is? Thank you in advance!

    Lots of rippling =(
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    freezer paper template on the fabric
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    This shows what I am clipping & turning.
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  2. #2
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    You need to clip wherever you have a curve, so, in this case, that would be all sides. Also, when sewing on the curves, it's very, very important not to stretch at all. I'm sure there are others that have more helpful advice also.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    I am confused, if that square is 1", your seam allowance looks larger than 1/4". It is kind of hard for me to tell. I am really not sure as I have never made one, it just looks larger than 1/4". I really don't starch much, but I wonder if this is one of those patterns where it would really help.
    Good luck, I am off to bed. There will be lots of ladies on in several hours and they will be able to help you.

  4. #4
    Super Member ChubbyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfkitty
    You need to clip wherever you have a curve, so, in this case, that would be all sides. Also, when sewing on the curves, it's very, very important not to stretch at all. I'm sure there are others that have more helpful advice also.
    Thanks, wolfkitty! I had a feeling I was supposed to be clipping all four curves.

  5. #5
    Super Member ChubbyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    I am confused, if that square is 1", your seam allowance looks larger than 1/4". It is kind of hard for me to tell. I am really not sure as I have never made one, it just looks larger than 1/4". I really don't starch much, but I wonder if this is one of those patterns where it would really help.
    Good luck, I am off to bed. There will be lots of ladies on in several hours and they will be able to help you.
    You are correct, Sadiemae. My seam allowance was larger than 1/4". I was cutting them with a 1/2" seam allowance because I didn't think it would matter if it was being turned under. Guess it does. LOL!

  6. #6
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    oh yes it does matter. only 1/4" seam allowance otherwise they won't fit together. Remember.....1/4" seam allowance unless otherwise indicated which is almost never.

  7. #7
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
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    Clip little V's on curves, it helps, no stretching, and make sure you match centers to start your pinning.

  8. #8
    Super Member sewmuchmore's Avatar
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    I would really starch it, to help to prevent it from stretching. :thumbup:

  9. #9
    Super Member grammyp's Avatar
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    Are you English Paper Piecing them? Mine did that, but when I took the paper out, they flattened nicely.

  10. #10
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Are you piecing on the machine or by hand? This pattern is really made for hand piecing. Everything goes together much nicer by doing it by hand. You just start at the end and gradually work your way around easing it together as you go. Be sure to keep that near perfect 1/4 inch seam allowance. That is the key to making everything match up right. I have done two of these and helped a couple of friends on theirs. They are great looking. The ones with a few bright colors really pop. Good luck. I wish I had a video camera. I'd just show you how to do it. With hand piecing you don't have to clip curves. Good luck! Keep us updated.

  11. #11
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    and like DP's, match the centers and ends/edges. then sew.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for this thread - the apple core is a pattern that I someday want to tackle (added to my list of Lone Star, Wedding Ring and Cathedral Window). I am interested in hearing all the tips and tricks that others might have!

    I do wonder if the added seam allowance might be causing it to pucker?

  13. #13
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    I just learned curves myself , what I did was sew two pieces together then press and clip. I found if I pressed as I went it was helpful in making sure it was laying flat and at that time i could check for ripples and puckering in my seam.

  14. #14
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I didn't clip any curves on mine and I used a rotary cutter on a plastic template. All the pieces fit perfectly together. No rippling. As someone said, it's because your pieces aren't fitting and there's stretching on the bias going on.

  15. #15
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    Can we see the back? That would give some clues?

    I've found it helpful to trace the stitching lines on the fabric.

    I've also found it helpful to mark the "half-way" point on each seam and pin those together.

    I'm thinking that this would be a lot easier to hand sew than machine sew. Then stop at the end of each seam. Then it would be easier to press.

    Also, it it a LOT more manageable with just the 1/4 inch seam allowances.

  16. #16
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I have never done this pattern, but have made curves and have some ideas. The outer curves don't need to be clipped, just the inny curves, but then you have to press towards the inny curves. It will lay nicely. Also, your seam allowances need to be 1/4 inch, but only for consistency of your stitching. Since you need to start and stop 1/4 inch away from the edge, if your seam allowances are all 1/4 inch, they will all fit at the end. If you do them larger, just remember to treat them all the same, measurements wise and again, it will fit nicely. Last, curves always need a little persuasive pressing. Starch will help persuade them to lay the way you want, or a spray bottle. Hope this helps.

  17. #17
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    If you want a really easy way to do this, go to Eleanor Burns website and watch her video:

    http://quiltinaday.com/theater/egg/egg1.html

    It's the video called: Old Maid's Puzzle and Double Axehead. Axehead is another name for Apple Core.

    Video number is 2705. She shows how to make two blocks in this video and the first one is the Old Maid's Puzzler or Drunkards path.

  18. #18
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Okay, I just noticed something. You're going about it all wrong. Do one row at a time. 1 up, 1 across until you get it as long as you want it. Then put the next row together the same way only start 1 across, 1 up until you get the same number of pieces. Then when you get two rows made like this you can sew them together matching your seams. Do you follow me? If not, I'll do a couple and take pictures and show you. Also your seams should start on one side and end on the other.

  19. #19
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  20. #20
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    In your second picture, your seam allowances are not all the same. Some of the corners are off, and this will affect your piecing. Some of your sides will be too short, and that will stretch on your other blocks.

    It doesn't really matter whether you use a 1/4" or a 1/2", but it has to be a consistent 1/4" or 1/2" seam :wink:

    Be very careful, you have bias edges... handle them carefully or they will stretch and distort.

  21. #21
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by #1piecemaker
    Okay, I just noticed something. You're going about it all wrong. Do one row at a time. 1 up, 1 across until you get it as long as you want it. Then put the next row together the same way only start 1 across, 1 up until you get the same number of pieces. Then when you get two rows made like this you can sew them together matching your seams. Do you follow me? If not, I'll do a couple and take pictures and show you. Also your seams should start on one side and end on the other.
    a picture says a thousand words. So, I put these together to explain what I was trying to say.

    Don't mind my toes, but see how the pieces fit together. Then you just keep going making rows according to how big you want it.
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    Place right sides together and begin a running stitch from the edge.
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    See how nicely the pieces work around.
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    Begin first row with one across, the second row begins with one down
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    See how your seams match up when sewing the two strips together
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  22. #22
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    use lots of steam to shrink it down

  23. #23
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    I seen you have received a lot of very good help. I am so glad we have good friends here to help us. I certainly can't off any advice but I did take note as to what was said as I hope to make one someday, I already have my homespuns and plaids ready to start.

  24. #24
    Super Member ChubbyBunny's Avatar
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    I am machine piecing and I'm pretty sure they are being stretched in the process. I'm not very good at hand piecing. Maybe I should work on it? I want to thank all of you for your advice and help! I really appreciate it. I'll try out the different suggestions and let you know what happens.:-)

  25. #25
    Super Member ChubbyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by #1piecemaker
    Okay, I just noticed something. You're going about it all wrong. Do one row at a time. 1 up, 1 across until you get it as long as you want it. Then put the next row together the same way only start 1 across, 1 up until you get the same number of pieces. Then when you get two rows made like this you can sew them together matching your seams. Do you follow me? If not, I'll do a couple and take pictures and show you. Also your seams should start on one side and end on the other.
    Thank you so much for taking the time to explain that and post photos!!! You have been very helpful! :thumbup:

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