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Thread: Does the cost ever hold you back?

  1. #1
    Super Member Naturalmama's Avatar
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    I haven't even completed my first top yet, but I've been buying fabric here and there, collecting for my next two quilts... I don't even want to know how much I've already spent on fabric, charms, batting, thread, and quilting tools (not to mention sewing machine repair!) But that isn't even the killer for me - what I'm really terrified of is the quilting cost. I haven't called around yet here, but I know it isn't cheap. Is this really a hobby I should pursue? (I have no patience for hand quilting, and tying I'd only like for a certain look - not as a rule) How do you do it when you live on relatively low income?

  2. #2
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    Take a class and learn how to quilt it yourself! It takes practice and you need to be less of a perfectionist, but your quilts can still look great! I have done most of mine with stitch in a ditch or decorative stitching. I took a free-motion quilting class months ago and am now just getting brave enough to do it on quilts that are gifts. I expect I'll get better with each quilt. The fabrics can cost you a bundle, but if you shop around, you can find some great deals on quality fabric online. That helps alot, especially with the backing fabric.

  3. #3
    MelissaK's Avatar
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    Quilt yourself, or stay away from big quilts and do little projects instead. I won't make a quilt bigger than 60 x 60 b/c I can't fit it in my machine.

  4. #4
    Super Member Naturalmama's Avatar
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    I have this thing in my head that if I'm going to go through all the trouble of making a quilt, it needs to be big enough to be practical - big enough to use. Which for me means basically queen-sized. I don't suppose I could quilt that with a regular sewing machine?

  5. #5
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Oh yes, you could!! My second quilt was a queen size (barely) and I quilted it stitch in the ditch on a $80 Brother sewing machine. I had to move it to my dining room table and use the whole table to support the quilt, and roll it up tight to fit the small opening of my machine, but I did it.

  6. #6
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    It can be done, but you'd have to use thin batting. The teacher of the class I took quilted a king size on a regular machine. The trick is to focus on a small section at a time. Or you could make several sections, quilt first then assemble the sections. I have a machine w/a larger throat, so I can fit a larger one in mine.

  7. #7
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    Hi Tina---the cost of quilting can be a deterrent. It can be a very expensive hobby!! But, as you get more into it, you will accumulate tools and supplies and then the cost diminishes some. I am a good online shopper--find fabric on sale, order from shops where you can get free shipping, etc. Connecting Threads is an awesome-check them out.

    The cost to have a quilt quilted can be costly. To machine stipple at a long arm quilter is about .018 cents/per square inch here. If you are having a quilt custom quilted, it costs even more. Have you thought about doing it yourself? If you do not already have a walking foot, it would be a good investment for you---would pay for itself with your first quilt. You can start off by quilting in the ditch, doing grid quilting, etc. When you are feeling more comfortable with your quilting, you may want to branch out and buy a foot for your machine that will allow you to do free motion quilting. There are MANY people on this board who do all their own quilting with a regular sewing machine--and turn out awesome quilts!!!

    If quilting is a hobby you have a passion for-and it sounds like it may be since you are already planning your next 2 quilts-then you will find a way to make it work for you.

  8. #8
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naturalmama
    I have this thing in my head that if I'm going to go through all the trouble of making a quilt, it needs to be big enough to be practical - big enough to use. Which for me means basically queen-sized. I don't suppose I could quilt that with a regular sewing machine?
    I prefer to make large throws---the men in my family are all over 6 feet--so we like 'em long! Most of my quilts are 60X80", give or take a few inches. This is easily manageable on your machine. A throw quilt is about as practical as it gets--they get used the most of any quilt I make.

  9. #9
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I'm sure cost is a consideration for nearly everyone, but it doesn't mean you can't enjoy quilting. Throws are awesome. If you make enough throws for everyone you can turn the heat way down. Voila! Money saved on heat equals money you can spend on quilting!!

    There are dozens of people on this board quilting beautiful quilts on machines that cost less than $100. It can be done. Patience and creativity will take you far.

  10. #10
    Power Poster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcia
    Quote Originally Posted by Naturalmama
    I have this thing in my head that if I'm going to go through all the trouble of making a quilt, it needs to be big enough to be practical - big enough to use. Which for me means basically queen-sized. I don't suppose I could quilt that with a regular sewing machine?
    I prefer to make large throws---the men in my family are all over 6 feet--so we like 'em long! Most of my quilts are 60X80", give or take a few inches. This is easily manageable on your machine. A throw quilt is about as practical as it gets--they get used the most of any quilt I make.
    This is about the size I like - I call them "couch quilts" - big enough to cover most people (all over) - and small enough to be able to get through the machine. Also, fairly manageable to wash and dry.

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