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Thread: Dryer Sheets

  1. #1
    Super Member Sweeterthanwine's Avatar
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    Dryer Sheets

    Somewhere a time ago I read on this board that you should not use dryer sheets in string quilts because of the fragrance and chemicals in them. How about the fragrance free ones? I know they probably still have some chemicals in them, but at least there is no fragrance to bother allergies. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I thought it was USED dryer sheets that worked for foundation piecing but could be wrong. Some of the chemicals and scent would have washed away but don't know if all is gone.

  3. #3
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    The recent post said not to use either washed or unwashed dryer sheets as the used one's still had chemicals in them.

  4. #4
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I wouldn't use the dryer sheets for a baby quilts. I guess you could add fusible to the same list. The adhesive is full of chemicals and doesn't wash out. The hospital usually has the chemical or allergic sensitive patients in a control environment so no donated items are in their room anyway.
    Got fabric?

  5. #5
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    I believe that over a very short period of time, the stuff washes out of the dryer sheets. It's not much after being used the first time, and I hand wash them and dry them again in the dryer before using them. They work so perfect for applique pieces, I don't want to quit using them. A few people are sensitive to products like that, so if making a quilt for a specific person who has that sensitivity, then I wouldn't use them. But for most people I don't believe the scent issue is an issue at all. Use common sense in all these things. It's like baseball stadiums saying they're going to stop selling peanuts because someone in the stands "might" be allergic to peanuts. All these extreme measures are just getting to be too much!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member qbquilts's Avatar
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    If you want to use them, maybe include a content message on your label? Like "Made with recycled dryer sheets and scraps of new (or recycled) fabric using (whatever kind of batting you use) batting and 100% cotton backing." That way you can use them and any recipients will be aware of them.

  7. #7
    Super Member babyboomerquilter's Avatar
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    I like them to use for applique. The chemicals and scent does not bother me because I only give my items to family or friends that I knowI agree they should not be put in babies items.
    Bonnie

  8. #8
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    I started the thread about dryer sheets. I do not recommend using them- used or not- out of consideration for others because of chemicals- not just fragrances. There's no reason to use them because I can use inexpensive interfacing to achieve the EXACT same result for applique. Dryer sheets are just spun polyester mesh or scrim interfacing that is impregnated with chemicals. Interfacing is very cheap. I'm not going crazy and saying don't wash the fabrics and quilts in detergents that might be a problem for someone. They can rewash if needed. I'm just saying don't hide chemicals INSIDE the quilt. It's NOT just about the scent and whether or not you can smell it, and it's hardly an extreme measure. If someone has a chronic headache, eye watering, breathing problem, or itchy skin or rash- who would think it was a reaction to something INSIDE the quilt? Seems like an unnecessary and avoidable risk if you are gifting a quilt meant to make someone feel good. I'm a retired Nurse Practitioner, and have heard agreement from many folks here on the Board. Common sense says go ahead and reuse the dryer sheets for a second load, dusting, maybe wall hanging, etc., not inside a quilt or quilted clothing.

  9. #9
    QM
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    Someone I know had discoloration to her quilt from the (used) dryer sheets. I did not hear what brand, if it matters. I can't use any scented sheets anyway, so that does not apply to me. Our pricey new couch came wrapped in about 15 yards of poly scrim I plan to use that for foundations. Something I have used previously is well used and well washed elderly bedsheets.

  10. #10
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    If they work for you use them. It's really no one's business but yours.

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