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Thread: Dryer Sheets

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    They belong in the garbage.
    I have a stack in my sewing room and when I get some gunk on the iron, I run the hot iron over the used dryer sheet(s). It generally cleans all the gunk and makes the iron shiny again. Then they go in the garbage.

  2. #27
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    I have never seen the need for using dryer sheets at all, not even to dry clothes. Started out from the days when I was too poor to afford much of anything much less dryer sheets! Now I don't see the need for them at all - just adding chemicals to my clothes and more garbage for the landfill.


    Try using gift wrap for a foundation. When I needed 15" squares this worked great. Paper tears off easily. Next year after Christmas buy a cheap roll or two and keep for quilting!

  3. #28
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewmary View Post
    Try using gift wrap for a foundation. When I needed 15" squares this worked great. Paper tears off easily. Next year after Christmas buy a cheap roll or two and keep for quilting!
    Why buy it?
    Why not recycle the used paper?
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  4. #29
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    I say use what you have and what you like and what you can afford. If you want them extra clean I bet a wash in original dawn dish soap would remove most of the residue.

  5. #30
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    I have read on here that they are flammable. That would keep me from using them!

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by carolynjo View Post
    I have read on here that they are flammable. That would keep me from using them!
    But isn't fabric flammable????????????????????

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbridges22 View Post
    But isn't fabric flammable????????????????????
    I do not think either the cotton or the dryer sheets would survive a fire. The funny thing is I do use the lint out of the dryer and used dryer sheets to start my garbage fire. Both are a sure fire way to get a fire going.

  8. #33
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    I have fragrance allergies - especially to perfumes that have any musk as a base. I see so many physicians offices and dental practices that now say they requestt a fragrance free environment and will ask any person with obvious "perfume smells" to reschedule. I don't use fragrance free everything (original scent Tide doesn't effect my allergies). It is a hit and miss process for me, so I avoid them as much as I can. Remember the marketing phrase "better life through chemicals? Well, duh, look what has happened with the rise in cancer and diseases.

    Perfume was solely invented to cover up the smell of unwashed bodies - and now successful marketing makes the insecure person "feel undressed" if they don't spray chemicals all over their body. The chemicals in dryer sheets are very toxic to everyone eventually, why even use them? I remember when fabric companies used formalyhyde in 100% cotton. I used to have breathing difficulties in fabric store.

    Quote Originally Posted by Monroe View Post
    I started the thread about dryer sheets. I do not recommend using them- used or not- out of consideration for others because of chemicals- not just fragrances. There's no reason to use them because I can use inexpensive interfacing to achieve the EXACT same result for applique. Dryer sheets are just spun polyester mesh or scrim interfacing that is impregnated with chemicals. Interfacing is very cheap. I'm not going crazy and saying don't wash the fabrics and quilts in detergents that might be a problem for someone. They can rewash if needed. I'm just saying don't hide chemicals INSIDE the quilt. It's NOT just about the scent and whether or not you can smell it, and it's hardly an extreme measure. If someone has a chronic headache, eye watering, breathing problem, or itchy skin or rash- who would think it was a reaction to something INSIDE the quilt? Seems like an unnecessary and avoidable risk if you are gifting a quilt meant to make someone feel good. I'm a retired Nurse Practitioner, and have heard agreement from many folks here on the Board. Common sense says go ahead and reuse the dryer sheets for a second load, dusting, maybe wall hanging, etc., not inside a quilt or quilted clothing.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  9. #34
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    Unless you have some terrible allergy, I doubt you are in any danger from dryer sheets. After all, whatever chemicals are in them at the start of the drying cycle are in your clothing, linens, etc., when they come out of the dryer.

    However, if you are really scared of the dyer sheets, try using paper stabilizer. That can include old phone book paper if you are an avid recycler. You can also use new paper towels, which tear away very easily. You might also go to your local newspaper and buy an end roll--the roll that's too short to use on the presses. You will have to cut it to size, but it is great for string quilts--no print on it and no chemicals except what's in paper to start with. Or buy the cheapest copy paper you can find. froggyintexas
    Quote Originally Posted by Sweeterthanwine View Post
    Somewhere a time ago I read on this board that you should not use dryer sheets in string quilts because of the fragrance and chemicals in them. How about the fragrance free ones? I know they probably still have some chemicals in them, but at least there is no fragrance to bother allergies. Any thoughts?

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