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Thread: English paper piecing question..

  1. #1
    Super Member Ms Grace's Avatar
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    I was looking around and found Instantpiecing.com, where you can download the paper pieces for English paper piecing. I've never attempted this before, but I'm very interested now! :lol:
    My question is: Can you reuse the paper pieces? From what I understand, a lapquilt can take just over 500 paper pieces. :shock:
    If I could reuse them, it would make it easier to be printing all this out.
    Anyone ever done this??

  2. #2
    Super Member gcathie's Avatar
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    I sure don't see how you could reuse the paper piecing method....but hey anything is posible....but I don't know of it.....I'll watch this post to see your responses...

  3. #3
    Izy
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    Super Member Izy's Avatar
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    Yes you can use the papers again, I did alot of my big sampler quilt blocks by this method, when you whip stitch them together, you should be only catching the edge of the two fabrics together and not the papers, and if you tack with minimal stitching, paying more attention to corners etc., you can get them out fairly easily :D

    A little tip, on any piece that will eventually form your outside edge, make sure you leave additional fabric, then you can square up your block once all papers are removed. The internal seam allowances aren't as important as the paper is your actual guide, so stress to cut out the paper as accurately as possible :D

    I LOVE this technique :D

  4. #4
    Izy
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    Now I just visited the website and downloaded the free sample....I think this is a confusing way to do it....

    It shows each piece with a seam allowance and an internal measurement...very confusing!!

    Here's what I did:

    Choose any block pattern that you can reproduce onto squared paper with each square measuring 1/4", then draw out the whole block pattern EXACTLY to finished size NO seam allowances. I colour the block with pencils to remind which fabric to use. Then with a dull rotary blade and ruler, cut this up exactly on the lines, and put into an envelope.


    1. Select a section, centre on fabric ensure enough seam allowance on all sides with extra if it is an external block edge which you don't need to tack to the paper, leave this one unsewn.

    2. Pin in place, then tack paying attention to fold corners and points neatly.

    3. Continue with all pieces, then give them a light iron to form a lovely sharp edge.

    4. Pin adjoining pieces lining up each edge carefully. Start to whip stitch them right sides together, just taking a few threads of each piece, I start about half inch away from an edge, then double back to make it more secure (less chance of it coming undone at the edges...wonder how I know that?)

    5. When you come to intersections be careful not to catch too much of the fabric that you have folded under as this will need to open out to lay flatter when you take the papers out.

    6. I iron each block on the reverse checking all seams are lying the correct way at intersections etc. Leave the papers in at this stage as it stops the blocks from getting creased. A quick squirt of starch on the front helps too.

    7. Join each block to it's neighbour and when it is surrounded you can remove the papers are reuse.

    8. If you are doing hexagons, you can join them in sections like the grandmothers garden, the ajoin them, at which point you can free up the papers.

    Here is a link to a site that gives you free downloadable graph papers which you size yourself then save and print off as many as you like, cheaper than buying them!!



    2" half squared triangles!!

    this is quarter inch graph paper

    hexagons to download

  5. #5
    Izy
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    Oooops the first paper is for another technique like Thangles :D

    Here's the link to the site that you can size each pattern then download in a pdf..


    http://incompetech.com

  6. #6
    PrettyKitty's Avatar
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    I have nice memories of being about 8 years old learning how to hand sew using the paper piecing method to make hexagons. Good luck trying this out, I remember it being very satisfying.

  7. #7
    Senior Member MAXIES2's Avatar
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    I too first got into patchwork by making hexagons with the paper piecing method and making them into pin cushions. Its very relaxing and you can take your work anywhere with you.
    Katherine

  8. #8
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    I have used this method on the machine. I'm great for finding something I like and getting the pattern before I even know what I'm getting into.

    Here's the link to a barn quilt I did using mostly English paper piecing.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/30/11287.page

  9. #9
    Tiffany's Avatar
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    Thank you Izy for the instructions! This is one of those techniques I want to try out and it's on my list, I just haven't gotten that far yet. I've saved your instructions and the website for the grid paper and I may just plan out a little Easter project to try this technique out with. My friends all use the die cut mylar plastic pieces with their English paper piecing projects. There is a hole in the very center which is used to pop the plastic template out with. I wonder if that would be helpful with the actual papers?

    I have some old hexagons that my daughters great-grandmother cut out sometime in the forties or fifties. They are not cut as precisely as I would like and I bet this method would work great for squaring them up. I would love to finish each of these into a couple of quilts, one to give to each of my daughters. ....ugh! Another project! :? :lol:
    Piece ~ Tiffany

  10. #10
    Super Member Ms Grace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mary quite contrary
    I have used this method on the machine. I'm great for finding something I like and getting the pattern before I even know what I'm getting into.

    Here's the link to a barn quilt I did using mostly English paper piecing.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/30/11287.page

    That is beautiful!

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