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Thread: FMQ Book?

  1. #1
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    I seem to recall that someone had recommended a particular book about FMQ...presumably instructions and design ideas. Can anybody suggest one?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Super Member mommamac's Avatar
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    I'm on the side line waiting for an answer too.

  3. #3
    Super Member Quiltforme's Avatar
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    This is the one that I recommended

    Hari Walners : Continuous Line Quilting Designs.
    Why I like it: This book has taken me from the oh my gosh how am I going to do this to start thinking of what block will work with my designs. He shows what batting looks like with what thread very cool! I LOVE the many designs and how they break them down and the pictures they have with them are amazing I feel like there is not one that I cannot do. His main point on FMQ is Practice, Practice and Practice.

  4. #4
    Senior Member newestnana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quiltforme
    This is the one that I recommended

    Hari Walners : Continuous Line Quilting Designs.
    Why I like it: This book has taken me from the oh my gosh how am I going to do this to start thinking of what block will work with my designs. He shows what batting looks like with what thread very cool! I LOVE the many designs and how they break them down and the pictures they have with them are amazing I feel like there is not one that I cannot do. His main point on FMQ is Practice, Practice and Practice.
    Thanks, Jade. One question: are you using a long-arm machine or a domestic machine?

  5. #5
    Super Member Quiltforme's Avatar
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    right now it is domestic but my LA will be here next week.

  6. #6
    Super Member fleurdelisquilts.com's Avatar
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    I FMQ on both my long arm and domestic machine. I started with stipples and then started adding small designs to the stippling. Now I can do any design that I can "see" in my head. Large designs are still hard, so I sometimes use a small white board I bought at the dollar store to practice and figure out ways to make my ideas continuous. It's easy once you get started. Now, I can't do pantographs, or rather I don't do pantographs because they are boring. I'd much rather do custom quilting, which I happen to call playing.

  7. #7
    Super Member Quiltforme's Avatar
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    I have to agree I just started and let the quilt talk to me (ok the quilt was for a 3 yo he has no opinion if I mess up he didn't care :) I allowed myself to make mistakes and just enjoy myself.

  8. #8
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    Try "Free-Motion : Quilting made eade" by Eva A. Larkin It has 186 design from 8 simple shapes. The shapes are like flower, heart, diamond. The patterns are easy yet pretty. You can take the pattern ideas and blow them up to fit you block and then trace,put paper on block or pounce on block to stitch. I got the book from Connecting thread at 40% off $27. I ordered it to bring order up to $50 for free shipping and am very please with the book.

  9. #9
    Kas
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    I am partial to Diane Guadynski's two books. I have them both. The first is more basic and the second follows her own growth and techniques. I look for patterns everywhere and it doesn't have to be a continuous line design. With backtracking and things like that I have turned many a regular stencil into a continuous line. I have one of Hari Walner's books that is helpful.

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