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Thread: Freezer Paper vs. Fusible Web

  1. #11
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyqueen30094
    ok so I have 2 hugh rolls of freezer paper - don't ask long story - any way I was going to iron it to the front of the fabric, trace cut applique then turn applique over spray with adhesive spray, stick to fabric, remove freezer paper, then stitch applique ideas on this?
    I think the only way this will work is if you use a satin stitch on the edges. I would do two rows of satin stitch, the first one narrower and the second one wider to cover the first one. That way there shouldn't be any threads fraying around the edges. The advantage of using fusible for raw edge applique is that the fusible tends to prevent fraying of the edge -- at least for awhile; the disadvantage of using fusible is that it stiffens the fabric.

  2. #12
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    I learned how to do freezer paper applique from Harriet Hargrave's book:
    http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Mach.../dp/157120136X

    I prefer it to fusible applique because the edges are turned under (as in hand applique) and the fabric is not stiffened (fusible stiffens the applique).

    It's not a big deal to remove the freezer paper, at least the way I do it. I wait until the quilt top is finished, then turn it over and cut away the fabric behind the applique, leaving 1/4-inch seam allowance. This is easy to do because the thread shows you the edge of the applique, and the freezer paper keeps your scissors away from accidentally cutting the top fabric.

    I use Elmer's school paste -- the old-fashioned paste that smells like peppermint -- instead of glue stick or starch. I rub it on the fabric edge with my finger and then turn the fabric edge.

    To apply the freezer paper backed applique to the background fabric, I use HH's method that makes an almost invisible machine stitch that resembles hand applique.

  3. #13
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    another nice thing about using freezer paper is you do not have to reverse patterns like you have to for fusable, you can trace your appliques as they are then iron to the right side of fabric and your appliques are correct...makes it nice to not have to copy everything twice. you cut out your piece leaving a 'seam-allowance'- turn under allowance. it is easier to stitch...no stiffness from the fusable. it is just a matter of choice, some people always use fusable, some never, some depends on the project...that's how it is for me, i use fusable for projects with lots of pieces where i can pre-construct the piece before adding it to the block, or quilt. i use freezer paper if i'm going to do any hand-applique work or for simple designs without a lot of pieces.
    my sewing room would probably close if i ran out of freezer paper. i use it every day for something.
    you can reuse a piece of freezer paper over and over (some people say up to 15 times...i've never really counted) so that is a benifit over fusable with its once and it's done. if you are making multiple same pieces of a shape you don't have to use more fusable, one piece of freezer paper does it. cost wise its a great deal compared to fusable; and you can iron it to fabric to run through your printer.

  4. #14
    Senior Member LaurieE's Avatar
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    When I first tried using freezer paper, I used it on the wrong side and ironed the seam allowance around it. That didn't turn out real well and I didn't like it at all.

    Now I'm using it on top and needle turning the seam allowance under. That is so much better. The freezer paper is only there as a guide for how far to turn under the seam allowance.

    Another method I've tried, and the jury is still out on this method,is to sew the piece to be appliqued to tracing fabric. Slit the back of the tracing fabric so that you can turn it right side out. Iron the piece making sure that the tracing fabric does not show. Applique as usual.

    In case you don't know -- Tracing fabric is found by the interfacing in Joann's and has a grid on it for tracing multi-sized clothing patterns. It's lightweight, never stiff, has no glue whatsoever (because it isn't an iron-on).

  5. #15
    Super Member CoriAmD's Avatar
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    I don't have a problem at all with the freezer paper. I just use a dab of temporary fabric glue to tack it in place where I want it. That helps hold it in place until I satin stitch applique it. I have used the "heat and bond" and I guess I over do it with the iron because it doesn't stick well for me. Then I saw on Fon's & Porter show one time about the fabric glue. Now I save money using the freezer paper too! :)

  6. #16
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    wow, interesting thread, thanks!

  7. #17
    shaverg's Avatar
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    I don't have trouble with freezer paper and sometimes I use it on top and sometimes underneath, just depends. I don't like the glues so I just pin it with applique pins. I do sometimes use the fabric fold pen if I am doing needle turn.

    These rings were done with freezer paper underneath and just pinned in place and hand appliqued.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  8. #18
    shaverg's Avatar
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    I do take the freezer paper out either before I take my last stitches or cut the back. I prefer not to cut the back.

    The fabric fold pen helps turn the edge under.

  9. #19
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
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    Why go through all of this trouble with freezer paper. All I do is take a mechancial pencil and trace the shape on the fabric. Then I cut out the shape with an 1/8" seam. Pin shape on fabric and bring your needle up anywhere but a point and turn the seam allowance under and the line will be your guide. Then just stitch down. Pencil mark will wash out. :-D

    Easy peasy!!!! :thumbup:

  10. #20
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    Have you tried the iron resistant plastic such as
    "Perfect Shape" or "Templar". I have found this very good.
    You cut shapes then your fabric with seam allowance and dab starch on edges of the fabric and iron over the plastic. Makes really good clean shapes. I have also use a product called "Stable Magic" which is like a stiff pellon.
    Same method of turning the edges over but use glue instead of starch. I find I get good clean edges with this product as well. I always put bumps in the freezer paper but many like it.

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