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Thread: Freezer Paper vs. Fusible Web

  1. #51
    Super Member kwiltkrazy's Avatar
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    I believe freezer paper is for hand applique to take the place of needle turn. Wonder under is for machine applique.

  2. #52
    Senior Member Lois-nounoe's Avatar
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    I like to use the Freezer Paper ironed onto the wrong side of my fabric. I trim the fabric about 1/4 inch from the edge of the design and pin to my quilt top. I then needle turn under the paper and invisible stitch the applique on. I can then either remove the paper when I am almost done stitching or cut a small slip in the back of the applique and pull out the paper that way. Fusible is fine as long as it is the lighter weight. Otherwise it makes the design stiff.

  3. #53
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    I recently tried to buy freezer paper at the grocery store. It was "new" with plastic on the back of it. How do you iron this??? I believe Reynolds makes it. It even had a picture of an applique piece on the box. Ended up going to a local butcher shop and bought 3 feet from them!

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calif Jane
    The trick with freezer paper is to make it three sheets thick; then it is easy to use starch and press the seam over the paper. Remove the paper and attach the applique to your background fabric. Freezer paper is great because you can trace the pattern onto one thickness, then layer the three sheets and then cut it out on the line. Then iron the freezer paper template to the wrongside of the fabric. You will be ironing the freezer paper to your ironing board, but no problem. You can use your freezer paper template multiple times and it will still stick to your fabric. The template is easily removed from your applique before gluing it to the background.
    Cut right through the whole roll of freezer paper (with a bandsaw)
    cut into 3", 6", 9".(or whatever size you would use the most ) then you do not have to fight the whole roll of
    paper when you need small pieces. saves lots of waste.

  5. #55
    Senior Member Lois-nounoe's Avatar
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    You fuse the plastic side to your fabric then cut around your pattern. Some people lay the paper side down and then iron the seam allance to the plastic side by just folding over and ironing on the fabric to fuse. With the first method just remember to reverse your pattern.

  6. #56
    Member rustqlts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pommielover46514
    Really wow I didn't know that. Where do you purchase this at? Thanks for the information. Norma
    Here ya go:

    C. Jenkins 8.5 X 11 Freezer Paper Sheets

    It really saves me a lot of time....

  7. #57
    Member rustqlts's Avatar
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    same song second verse--here's the link:

    http://www.cjenkinscompany.com/

    rusty

  8. #58
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    thanks for the link

    Quote Originally Posted by rustqlts
    Check this out:

    http://www.allaboutapplique.net/cate...-top-applique/


    I use freezer paper on top of the fabric, in piece o' cake designs, but there are a lot of methods at this web site.

    rusty

  9. #59
    Member Calif Jane's Avatar
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    Layer two sheets of freezer paper and iron them together with the shiny side down on both sheets. Yes, this will stick to your ironing board, but peel it up while it is still warm. It will not mess up your ironing board! Trace your applique pattern onto the dull side of a single sheet of freezer paper. Then lay the this sheet on top of the other two, shiny side down. You will have three layers of freezer paper with your traced pattern on top. Cut out your applique patterns to use as templates. They are sturdy, and can be used over and over again---they will adhere to your fabric many times. Place the templates on the wrong side of the fabric , press with a warm iron, then cut out 1/8th to 1/4th inch from the template.
    Brush a weak solution of starch on the fabric to be turned, and press it to the freezer paper. When complete turn it over and inspect for wrinkles and press again. Remove the freezer paper template and glue the applique piece to your background.

  10. #60
    Senior Member dlf0122quilting's Avatar
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    When you use freezer paper, copy pattern pieces to shiny side of freezer paper with a sharpie pen, press the sheet of patterns down on a mat, remove it, press a second piece down on a mat and remove it. Let cool. Now press the plain sheet back down on the pressing mat, place pattern sheet down on top of the first sheet and press to the first sheet. By pressing the sheets separately, you will not get bubbles in your freezer paper templates. Next, cut out pattern pieces on drawn lines. Press pattern pieces to the back of the fabric, cut around pattern pieces leaving about 1/4" or a little less around each piece. Apply starch to excess fabric and press over templates. Remove freezer paper after ironing and apply to background fabric by machine or by hand.

  11. #61
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Iron freezer paper to the top of your ironing board to protect it from fusibles when ironing them to fabric etc.

  12. #62
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    I do almost the same thing that you do except I trace the shape on the back of the piece that I am appliqueing it to. Then I hand baste the shape to the background sewing from the back side so that you get it basted on exactly the way you want it to be finished. From then on, I do it the same way that you do. I've only done one applique quilt but it worked brilliantly.

  13. #63

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    That's great! It is very addictive, but right now I'm caught up in making baby clothes. Have a great day!

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calif Jane
    You will have three layers of freezer paper with your traced pattern on top. Cut out your applique patterns to use as templates. They are sturdy, and can be used over and over again---they will adhere to your fabric many times. Place the templates on the wrong side of the fabric , press with a warm iron, then cut out 1/8th to 1/4th inch from the template.
    Brush a weak solution of starch on the fabric to be turned, and press it to the freezer paper. When complete turn it over and inspect for wrinkles and press again. Remove the freezer paper template and glue the applique piece to your background.
    So when you press the freezer paper template to the fabric, you have only one thickness of freezer paper and the reason you ironed several sheets together was just so that you could make multiple copies?
    I have made multiple copies in the past by stacking several sheets and stapling them together, rather than ironing them. I usually put a staple inside the drawn image and around it as well. Then just pop the staple and you have multiple templates. Worked well for me.

  15. #65
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    Alex Anderson did a series of short video lessons on different kinds of applique - both machine and hand using fusibles and freezer paper. You can see the lessons at this site; http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/lesso...lasses_id/1010

  16. #66
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    I just did a dresden plate quilt that had the plate appliqued on. I used freezer paper as a stabilizer on the back of the base square and used polyester clear thread top and bottom with the applique stitch. I placed my fingernail on the stitches to stabilize them and ripped the freezer paper off after stitching. Was great and a lot less expensive than tear away stabilizer. I also use it as a pattern--2-3 layers ironed together for smaller pieces, iron it on to the fabric for the applique, cut the fabric a quarter or 3/8 inch away and use liquid starch or a sizing with a paint brush on the edges and press them over the paper. This makes a nice applique. Remove the paper,then use the freezer paper again to stabilize the backing as you machine stitch the different appliques you have just made. I always keep 2-3 rolls on hand.--Love the stuff.

  17. #67
    Super Member Ripped on Scotch's Avatar
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    I have used Steam-a-seam lite, shirt stablizer and the freezer paper method but I know how busy I get so the steam-a-seam lets me get to it when I can. I am going to do the "window method" with it next time so there is steam a seam on it but only about a 1/2 inch around the outside of the applique. I only do the hand applique thing if it's not a large piece.

  18. #68
    Junior Member topazgypsy's Avatar
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    wow beautiful, fabric and pattern

  19. #69
    Junior Member topazgypsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaverg
    I don't have trouble with freezer paper and sometimes I use it on top and sometimes underneath, just depends. I don't like the glues so I just pin it with applique pins. I do sometimes use the fabric fold pen if I am doing needle turn.

    These rings were done with freezer paper underneath and just pinned in place and hand appliqued.
    wow beautiful fabric and pattern

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by weezie
    I've only done one appliqued quilt top so far (needle turn). Used freezer paper and had no problems. I'll enclose a photo so you can see that there are a lot of small pieces. I did this a long time ago, but I remember that I pressed all the edges of each item around the freezer paper template and then removed the paper BEFORE stitching the piece to the quilt, so I did not have to cut into the back of the quilt top to remove pieces of freezer paper.
    that is beautiful. thank you so much for sharing, and God bless. Penny

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by applique
    I use Wonder Under fusible by the bolt on my huge appliques and satin stich each piece down with a very stiff stabilizer behind the piece which is removed after the stitching is done. Every quilt I make then goes through the washer and dryer. Works well for what I do. If it is something that needs handquilting, I use Misty Fuse which is soft and pliable.
    WOW, that is a stunning quilt. Thank you for sharing, and God bless. Penny

  22. #72
    Bernice H in Calif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunflower Girl
    Who uses freezer paper for applique? I've been using heat n bond but people keep telling me they use butcher's/freezer paper. If you use it, does it work as well?
    Freezer paper is generally used for hand applique.
    Heat and bond is generally used for machine applique.

  23. #73

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    I find freezer paper in the section where Aluminum foil, baggies, etc. are. Walmart always has it. I have also found it in other grocery stores.

    I too use both methods for my applique...depends on the project.

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