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Thread: guys in quilt shops

  1. #1
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    I was reading through your comments about my quilt police experiences and Eddie mentioned an experience in a lqs...and i was wondering, on a regular basis just how are you 'guys' treated when you enter a quilt shop? welcomed or snubbed?
    where i am there are 2 in different direction that i frequent...one of them (the biggest/oldest one) which i even worked at for awhile treated my hubby very poorly when he went in planning to buy stocking stuffers for me. He went in the owner was working that day (she is not much of a 'people' person) and pretty much made him feel like he had no business walking through the door...he left without buying anything and said he will never go back there....the other one, he loves going to! the ladies take him under their wings and shop with him, show him things, tell him about things they think i really should have...last christmas he spent about $100 at that one getting me great little things i would not usually buy myself but wonder how i got along without...
    so #1 shop really hurt her business, could have had a returning customer...#2 shop, get's his $$ when ever he's over that way...they make him feel like he's not out of place even though he is out of his element :thumbup:

  2. #2
    Rob
    Rob is offline

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    I have only been in two places.

    A chain fabric store in Denver gave off a bad vibe to me as if to say "you don't belong here." I will never go back after a couple of repeats...if I can avoid it.

    The other is the Fancy Tiger in Denver. It is a small general craft type shop with yarns and fabric but the fabric is mostly trendy (it is a small place). It is owned by a younger couple and in a more youthful area. But I will always support them when I can. They make me feel welcomed.

    Other than that, I now buy online.

  3. #3
    Senior Member justme's Avatar
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    Just wondering where these shops are? I am in MI and hubby and I are on rides all the time.. ,,, mmmm a destination.
    Thanks in advance.

  4. #4
    Power Poster dkabasketlady's Avatar
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    I'm not a guy, but I'm amazed at the number of men that are in the quilt shops when I'm shopping. At one of the best shops in FL.(my opinion), Rainbow's End in Dunedin FL., they even have a guy working there. He stocks, cuts fabric and is a quilter. He's very knowledgeable about the industry. I think it's fantastic that we have men that want to quilt and they're every bit as good as a woman, some are Better. I'm not gender biased in any way and firmly believe to each his own in everything. I don't think that I would have been welcome with my opinions in earlier years.

  5. #5
    stpatmom's Avatar
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    My husband went into our LQS to buy me thread that I had run out of. He said when he got there, they could tell he didn't belong there or know what he was doing (if you knew my husband, you'd understand). He told them what he needed, they joked with him and helped him find it. He actually enjoyed the experience and now I feel comfortable sending him back if I need to. Of course, the owner and all of the staff at the quilt shop are the best this side of the equator!

  6. #6
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    if it floats your boat then go with it. that is what i say most of the time. quilting is like anything else, a guy can do it and I think that all guys should lean basic sewing and women should learn basics in hunting, from guns to arrows. parents do their kids a disservice by not allowing a kids to learn as many skills as they have time fore. I went to a middle school and high school that taught archery and shooting to the boys but the girls were not allowed. It was during gym. can't remember but think that we had to learn dancing at that time. was mad because wanted to do the archery and shooting. more fun for me. not very coordinated when it comes to dancing. I look like I am having a seizure. So all you dads out there teach your sons to sew at least a hole in their cloths. it will do them a world of good later. my hubby can't iron or sew a button on to save his life. he has learned to vacuum since meeting me. hehe.

  7. #7
    Power Poster dkabasketlady's Avatar
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    Hey sahm4605, I haven't run a vacuum for the last 25 yrs., that's my DH's chore,lol!! When I had to have a hysterectomy, the dr. told him that using a vacuum was one of the hardest things for a woman and he has done it ever since and never complains. I also have bad issues now so he helps me whenever he can. He's definitely a keeper in my eyes!!!

  8. #8
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    I'm definitely not a guy but have a fun story. Last month I decided to do a mini shop hop myself to check out shops within an hours drive of me.
    When I walked into the last shop it was pretty busy with a preponderence of men in there. My "gaydar" pegged at maximum. I have had tons of gay friends so don't think I'm a homophobe or anything. These guys were a riot and a load of fun. Outgoing and friendly and more then willing to start up a conversation. One in particular asked me what I was working on as I was picking out batiks for the block swap here. We chatted about all kinds of stuff and he was very forthcoming in amiably speaking about my choices. In fact I had one blue in particular picked out I wasn't exactly crazy about and it turns out he wasn't either but it was the only shade of blue they had that I thought would go with one of my batiks at home. They were so much fun. Another was picking out fabrics for a round robin and I started teasing him that he should try a mitered border and expand his horizons. The others loved it and chimed right in. They were all quite animated and vocal but I thoroughly enjoyed the entertainment. Turns out one of the owners was a gay man, hence the preponderance of gay clientelle. After the group left the other owner said she hoped they hadn't offended me in any way. I laughed and said "oh no the girls were a riot". Both people behind the counter at the time (the woman and another guy) lauged and said that was the perfect answer.

  9. #9
    Junior Member katmom54's Avatar
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    sewing was once almost exclusively a male role...I grew up thinking that all men sewed since all I knew were men tailors and mill workers in the big woolen mills...

    think of all those beautiful men's suits - made by men -back in the early/mid century....

    my kids (2B,1G) have grown up with no gender restrictions - I mow the lawn, do house repairs and can use heavy equipment when needed...my boys do the dishes, their own laundry and can cook as good (almost) as me. I don't iron (hate it)...my husband and kids do their own...If you want to do it, go for it...just recently my daughter came home from her BF's mom's..mom wanted to have a lattice put on around her porch, but can't do it herself...the BF didn't have a clue, so my DD got out a hammer and saw and got it done...they laughed a little, then the mom asked if she knew how to put together the new swingset too,,,well, of course!!

    the guys in the hardware stores always turn to my husband when we go in...he says, nope - she is the one to talk to...

  10. #10
    Senior Member momymom's Avatar
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    I taught my son to take care of himself. To include learning to use a sewing machine and sew buttons back on. In Boy Scouts he was required to sew his own patches on his uniforn and sash. For 6 years, I didn't sew anything for him. He also washes dishes, does his own laundry and can clean just about anything in the house. We do our kids a disservice by not making them do chores. Should my son ask to learn to quilt (not very likly though) I would happily teach him. My girls also know how to change the oil in a car, check the fluids, air pressure, etc. One of my DD's has taken auto tech in school. I'm still hoping one of them will learn to quilt.

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