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Thread: Hand quilting workshop

  1. #1
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    I'm planning to offer one-day hand quilting workshops here in northern Germany. Just in case you would like to attend a workshop like this - what are the most important things you expect to learn or to talk about besides the quilting method?
    Thank you in advance for all you ideas and answers!

  2. #2
    Gal
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    Super Member Gal's Avatar
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    I love to hand quilt but am only a beginner, I would like to learn about what fabrics are better than others especially for hand quilting, (makes and labels) which batting gives what kind of look/feel when finished and lastly what all the differnt quilting cottons do, which is best etc. I have read all the theory but to actually compare samples that you can feel with your own hands would be very helpful for me anyway.

    Gal

  3. #3
    thismomquilts's Avatar
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    The size of the needle makes a difference, I think. Also, the use of (or not) of a thimble. Using a tool to help pull the needle through - I use the things a secretary uses to shuffle through papers. What about the fact that the size of the stitches are not as important as the spacing... the smaller stitches come with practice. Ways to mark the fabric for quilting....

  4. #4
    Super Member ginnie6's Avatar
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    oooh this sounds fun! I wish it was closer cause i would definitely go to it. All the basics would be good to know.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
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    That sounds like fun!

    If I took a class, I would expect to learn how to do the stitch, how to baste, how to set up the quilt in the hoop if you use one. You could also talk about needles, thimbles and thread and which ones are your favorite and why.

    Marking the quilt top is always a question that comes up, too. Oh, and battings that you like to use for handquilting.

    Let us know how it goes!

    Janet

  6. #6
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginnie6
    oooh this sounds fun! I wish it was closer cause i would definitely go to it. All the basics would be good to know.
    wish I could go too

  7. #7
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    the best ways to mark their tops. there are so many different methods out there today. Also, where they can find stencils to purchase.
    different types of quilting, straight line. cross hatching , echo quilting, or beautiful designs like feathers and flowers.
    Maybe even about how to make stencils from plastic
    also, they can use things around the house, saucers or cups can be used to do shell quilting. Let them know their imagination can find all types of things around their home for free that will work for patterns. Good luck with your class. As a hand quilter, I am so glad that this is still being taught :-D

  8. #8
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    I would like to have learned about the importance of the supplies being used. For years I just used quilting needles that I could buy at Joanns or Walmart. After a day or 2 of quilting, it was almost like I was quilting with a curved needle. Needless to say, I was going through needles like there was no tomorrow! I recently visited my LQS and bought some John James of England needles--like quilting through butter, what a difference and they haven't bent on me either! I would also talk about the different types of thimbles. I personally like the smooth underthimble that sticks to your finger tips so the needle slides off the thimble without sticking into the finger. Being a diabetic I stick my fingers enough without the added extra. :) On my upper hand I use the Ultra Thimble (has little grooves in it) to help push the needle through the fabric or the leather pads that stick on the end of your finger. The important thing is to try different types of thimbles to see which one is more comfortable for you. Also I cut the fingers off latex exam gloves and use them on my fingers to help pull the needle through the fabric. It all boils down to personal preference and trial and error. For me, I like to feel where the needle is and with regular thimbles I wasn't able to do that and my stitches were horrible! I also keep reading glasses handy to better keep my stitches on the straight and narrow :D

  9. #9
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    Thank you all for you posts! That really helps me a lot and I think my ideas for that workshops looks suitable.
    There is only one problem: I don't use thimbles at all!

  10. #10
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borntohandquilt
    Thank you all for you posts! That really helps me a lot and I think my ideas for that workshops looks suitable.
    There is only one problem: I don't use thimbles at all!


    I didn't use to either until I developed holes in the tips of my finger! That's why I use the covers on the tips of my finger! :-D

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