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Thread: How to put blocks on point with sashing,

  1. #1
    Member stitchesbyLA's Avatar
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    I have finished putting all of my blocks together. Next step, Sashing, corner stones and borders. Then I saw a quilt with blocks on point. Need to figure out how. Any good tutorials, out there?

  2. #2
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stitchesbyLA
    I have finished putting all of my blocks together. Next step, Sashing, corner stones and borders. Then I saw a quilt with blocks on point. Need to figure out how. Any good tutorials, out there?
    Get some freezer paper out, get a big ruler out and mark one line on a 45 degree diagonal.

    Use that for your guide in laying out blocks

    Easiest way to do sashing might be to put strip on lower right side, then another strip on lower left side of each block. Then lay out blocks. you'll need additional strips after you have all blocks laid out, but you'll be able to see that quite easily.

  3. #3
    MTS
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    Here are two helpful links:
    http://quiltbug.com/Articles/on-point.htm
    http://quiltbug.com/Articles/on-point.htm

    When I did the image in EQ below, you can see the program chops off the outer edges of the sashings (whether you use a separate color for cornerstones or not).

    However, that's not how it has to be. It's just an aesthetic choice.

    If you do want it chopped, then you would use the finished size of the white blocks to determine the size of the setting and corner triangles.

    If you keep them intact, and want your blocks fully framed, then you would take the finished white block size PLUS the finished sashing size to deterime the triangle sizes.

    Whatever that measurement is, you would look it up in the links provided above. You should heavily starch the fabric as you'll be dealing with long bias edges. Try not to manhandle the triangles too much. Take care when laying them out to attach to the rows - make sure they are orientated correctly. You won't be the first to attach one of them backwards or upside down. :roll: Mea Culpa. ;-)

    I always like to cut the triangles oversized by an inch or two as I like my points to float (personal preference).

    When adding the setting triangles, I always sew from the right angle out towards the edge making sure not to stretch the triangle. There will be little dog ears that I clip off before sewing the rows together.

    An on-point setting makes for a much more interesting look than a standard grid pattern. Just take it slow and you'll be thrilled with the outcome.

    Post pictures when you're done!

    And welcome!
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  4. #4
    Member stitchesbyLA's Avatar
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    Grannie Annie, I tried but couldnt figure this method out. Thanks for taking the time.

  5. #5
    Member stitchesbyLA's Avatar
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    MTS,
    Thank you Thank you Thank you. I origianally had it set up as a grid pattern 4 columns with 5 rows. So I need to figure out that conversion to set on point. Then I can use your formulas in the link to make all the setting triangles.

  6. #6
    Member stitchesbyLA's Avatar
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    Question. If the blocks are gonna have sashing and a corner stone. Do I only use have of that measurement as the finished block size to figure the setting triangles. Since the blocks actually share half of the sashing etc. Does this make sense?

  7. #7
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Slightly off-topic but still relevant - I have a technique for sashing that I really like. Sometimes it's hard to get the blocks lined up straight on the sashing, so I prefer to add sashing to each block. Instead of sewing long strips between each row, sew a border of sashing to each block. Here's a picture showing what I mean:

    http://www.seamstobeyouandme.com/wor...06/Lynette.jpg

  8. #8
    Super Member feffertim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    Here are two helpful links:
    http://quiltbug.com/Articles/on-point.htm
    http://quiltbug.com/Articles/on-point.htm

    When I did the image in EQ below, you can see the program chops off the outer edges of the sashings (whether you use a separate color for cornerstones or not).

    However, that's not how it has to be. It's just an aesthetic choice.


    what a great link. Thank you
    If you do want it chopped, then you would use the finished size of the white blocks to determine the size of the setting and corner triangles.

    If you keep them intact, and want your blocks fully framed, then you would take the finished white block size PLUS the finished sashing size to deterime the triangle sizes.

    Whatever that measurement is, you would look it up in the links provided above. You should heavily starch the fabric as you'll be dealing with long bias edges. Try not to manhandle the triangles too much. Take care when laying them out to attach to the rows - make sure they are orientated correctly. You won't be the first to attach one of them backwards or upside down. :roll: Mea Culpa. ;-)

    I always like to cut the triangles oversized by an inch or two as I like my points to float (personal preference).

    When adding the setting triangles, I always sew from the right angle out towards the edge making sure not to stretch the triangle. There will be little dog ears that I clip off before sewing the rows together.

    An on-point setting makes for a much more interesting look than a standard grid pattern. Just take it slow and you'll be thrilled with the outcome.

    Post pictures when you're done!

    And welcome!

  9. #9
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by stitchesbyLA
    Question. If the blocks are gonna have sashing and a corner stone. Do I only use have of that measurement as the finished block size to figure the setting triangles. Since the blocks actually share half of the sashing etc. Does this make sense?
    Quote Originally Posted by MTS
    If you keep them intact, and want your blocks fully framed, then you would take the finished white block size PLUS the finished sashing size to deterime the triangle sizes.
    I did include that in the previous post. ;-)

    Again,

    If you have no sashing, then it's just the finished measurement of the white block.
    If you have sashing, but are chopping off the end pieces, like EQ is doing, then it's just the measurement of the finished white block.
    You can see in the diagram below how the pink cornerstones/sashing would be part of the outer edge, so it need not be included in the setting triangle.

    btw I don't particularly like that look because I prefer the full framing effect around the whole quilt - the whole zig-zag efffect. And the more I look at it now, the more I think it's just not worth the hassle of dealing with it chopped off. So, ixnay on that. ;-)

    Now..if you have the full cornerstone/sashing, then you need to add the finished white block PLUS the finished width of the sashing. That total is the number you use to look up in those charts for cutting the starting squares for the setting triangles.

    Yell if you need anything else.

    eta:
    One thing I wanted to add - if you're trying to figure the size of a quilt with blocks on point, the number you need to remember is 1.414 (but 1.4 will do fine :mrgreen: ). That multiplied by the finished size of the block with give you the measurement of the diagonal.

    So if you have five 10" blocks that would create a 50" top across if put in a straight grid, those same blocks on point would be about 71" across.
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  10. #10
    MTS
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    Duh! And way better written than my ramblings. :mrgreen:
    http://quiltville.com/onpointmath.shtml

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